151

I have a table ("lms_attendance") of users' check-in and out times that looks like this:

id  user    time    io (enum)
1   9   1370931202  out
2   9   1370931664  out
3   6   1370932128  out
4   12  1370932128  out
5   12  1370933037  in

I'm trying to create a view of this table that would output only the most recent record per user id, while giving me the "in" or "out" value, so something like:

id  user    time    io
2   9   1370931664  out
3   6   1370932128  out
5   12  1370933037  in

I'm pretty close so far, but I realized that views won't accept subquerys, which is making it a lot harder. The closest query I got was :

select 
    `lms_attendance`.`id` AS `id`,
    `lms_attendance`.`user` AS `user`,
    max(`lms_attendance`.`time`) AS `time`,
    `lms_attendance`.`io` AS `io` 
from `lms_attendance` 
group by 
    `lms_attendance`.`user`, 
    `lms_attendance`.`io`

But what I get is :

id  user    time    io
3   6   1370932128  out
1   9   1370931664  out
5   12  1370933037  in
4   12  1370932128  out

Which is close, but not perfect. I know that last group by shouldn't be there, but without it, it returns the most recent time, but not with it's relative IO value.

Any ideas? Thanks!

7
  • possible duplicate of How to select the most recent set of dated records from a mysql table
    – Barmar
    Jun 11, 2013 at 7:01
  • Go back to the manual. You'll see that it offers solutions to this problem both with and without (correlated and uncorelated) subqueries.
    – Strawberry
    Jun 11, 2013 at 7:13
  • @Barmar, technically, as I pointed out in my answer, this is a duplicate of all 700 questions with the greatest-n-per-group tag.
    – Tomas
    Jun 11, 2013 at 7:51
  • @Prodikl, what is 'io (enum)'? May 9, 2017 at 19:25
  • I had a column called "IO" which stands for "in or out", it was an enum type with possible values "in" or "out". This was used to keep track of when people checked in and out of a class.
    – Keith
    May 10, 2017 at 2:04

13 Answers 13

239

Query:

SQLFIDDLEExample

SELECT t1.*
FROM lms_attendance t1
WHERE t1.time = (SELECT MAX(t2.time)
                 FROM lms_attendance t2
                 WHERE t2.user = t1.user)

Result:

| ID | USER |       TIME |  IO |
--------------------------------
|  2 |    9 | 1370931664 | out |
|  3 |    6 | 1370932128 | out |
|  5 |   12 | 1370933037 |  in |

Note that if a user has multiple records with the same "maximum" time, the query above will return more than one record. If you only want 1 record per user, use the query below:

SQLFIDDLEExample

SELECT t1.*
FROM lms_attendance t1
WHERE t1.id = (SELECT t2.id
                 FROM lms_attendance t2
                 WHERE t2.user = t1.user            
                 ORDER BY t2.id DESC
                 LIMIT 1)
14
  • 2
    wow! not only did this work, i was allowed to create a view with this query even though it contains subqueries. before, when i tried to create a view containing subqueries, it didn't let me. are there rules as to why this is allowed but another one isn't?
    – Keith
    Jun 11, 2013 at 7:24
  • very weird. thanks a ton! maybe it was because my subquery was a pseudo table that i was selecting FROM, where in this example its used in the WHERE clause.
    – Keith
    Jun 11, 2013 at 7:27
  • 4
    No need for subqueries! Moreover, this solution doesn't work if there are two records with exactly the same time. There is no need to try reinvent the wheel every time, as this is common problem - instead, go for already tested and optimized solutions - @Prodikl see my answer.
    – Tomas
    Jun 11, 2013 at 7:42
  • ah, thanks for the insight! i'll try the new code when i'm in the office tomorrow.
    – Keith
    Jun 11, 2013 at 11:46
  • 4
    @TMS This solution does work if the records have the exact same time, since the query is locating the record with the greatest id. This implies that the time in the table is the insertion time, which may not be a good assumption. Your solution instead compares timestamps and, when two timestamps are identical, you return the row with the greatest id as well. Hence, your solution also assumes that the timestamp in this table is related to the order of insertion, which is the largest flaw with both of your queries. Jun 8, 2016 at 19:42
89

No need to trying reinvent the wheel, as this is common greatest-n-per-group problem. Very nice solution is presented.

I prefer the most simplistic solution (see SQLFiddle, updated Justin's) without subqueries (thus easy to use in views):

SELECT t1.*
FROM lms_attendance AS t1
LEFT OUTER JOIN lms_attendance AS t2
  ON t1.user = t2.user 
        AND (t1.time < t2.time 
         OR (t1.time = t2.time AND t1.Id < t2.Id))
WHERE t2.user IS NULL

This also works in a case where there are two different records with the same greatest value within the same group - thanks to the trick with (t1.time = t2.time AND t1.Id < t2.Id). All I am doing here is to assure that in case when two records of the same user have same time only one is chosen. Doesn't actually matter if the criteria is Id or something else - basically any criteria that is guaranteed to be unique would make the job here.

10
  • 1
    The max uses t1.time < t2.time and the min would be t1.time > t2.time which is the opposite of my initial intuition.
    – None
    May 12, 2015 at 0:44
  • 1
    @J.Money because there is implicit negation hidden: you select all records from t1 which don't have corresponding record from t2 where the t1.time < t2.time condition applies :-)
    – Tomas
    May 12, 2015 at 14:37
  • 4
    WHERE t2.user IS NULL is a bit strange. What role does this line play? Nov 16, 2015 at 7:41
  • 1
    The accepted answer, posted by Justin, may be more optimal. The accepted answer uses a backward index scan on the primary key of the table, followed by a limit, followed by a sequence scan of the table. Therefore, the accepted answer can be greatly optimized with an additional index. This query could be optimized by an index as well, as it performs two sequence scans, yet also includes a hash and a "hash-anti-join" of the results of the sequence scan and the hash of the other sequence scan. I would be interested in an explanation of which approach is truly more optimal. Jun 8, 2016 at 19:52
  • @TMS could you please clarify OR (t1.time = t2.time AND t1.Id < t2.Id)) section?
    – Oleg Kuts
    Nov 14, 2016 at 19:36
6

Based in @TMS answer, I like it because there's no need for subqueries but I think ommiting the 'OR' part will be sufficient and much simpler to understand and read.

SELECT t1.*
FROM lms_attendance AS t1
LEFT JOIN lms_attendance AS t2
  ON t1.user = t2.user 
        AND t1.time < t2.time
WHERE t2.user IS NULL

if you are not interested in rows with null times you can filter them in the WHERE clause:

SELECT t1.*
FROM lms_attendance AS t1
LEFT JOIN lms_attendance AS t2
  ON t1.user = t2.user 
        AND t1.time < t2.time
WHERE t2.user IS NULL and t1.time IS NOT NULL
2
  • 1
    Omitting the OR part is a really bad idea if two records can have same time.
    – Tomas
    Nov 15, 2016 at 11:39
  • I would avoid this solution for performance sake. As @OlegKuts mentioned, this gets very slow on mid-to-large data sets. Mar 13, 2018 at 10:02
5

Already solved, but just for the record, another approach would be to create two views...

CREATE TABLE lms_attendance
(id int, user int, time int, io varchar(3));

CREATE VIEW latest_all AS
SELECT la.user, max(la.time) time
FROM lms_attendance la 
GROUP BY la.user;

CREATE VIEW latest_io AS
SELECT la.* 
FROM lms_attendance la
JOIN latest_all lall 
    ON lall.user = la.user
    AND lall.time = la.time;

INSERT INTO lms_attendance 
VALUES
(1, 9, 1370931202, 'out'),
(2, 9, 1370931664, 'out'),
(3, 6, 1370932128, 'out'),
(4, 12, 1370932128, 'out'),
(5, 12, 1370933037, 'in');

SELECT * FROM latest_io;

Click here to see it in action at SQL Fiddle

1
  • 1
    thanks for the follow up! yeah, i was going to create multiple views if there wasn't an easier way. thanks again
    – Keith
    Jun 11, 2013 at 7:32
5

If your on MySQL 8.0 or higher you can use Window functions:

Query:

DBFiddleExample

SELECT DISTINCT
FIRST_VALUE(ID) OVER (PARTITION BY lms_attendance.USER ORDER BY lms_attendance.TIME DESC) AS ID,
FIRST_VALUE(USER) OVER (PARTITION BY lms_attendance.USER ORDER BY lms_attendance.TIME DESC) AS USER,
FIRST_VALUE(TIME) OVER (PARTITION BY lms_attendance.USER ORDER BY lms_attendance.TIME DESC) AS TIME,
FIRST_VALUE(IO) OVER (PARTITION BY lms_attendance.USER ORDER BY lms_attendance.TIME DESC) AS IO
FROM lms_attendance;

Result:

| ID | USER |       TIME |  IO |
--------------------------------
|  2 |    9 | 1370931664 | out |
|  3 |    6 | 1370932128 | out |
|  5 |   12 | 1370933037 |  in |

The advantage I see over using the solution proposed by Justin is that it enables you to select the row with the most recent data per user (or per id, or per whatever) even from subqueries without the need for an intermediate view or table.

And in case your running a HANA it is also ~7 times faster :D

4
  • Would you need to add FIRST_VALUE() to every field you want to pull?
    – Stevoisiak
    Dec 2, 2021 at 20:32
  • Since OP asked about getting the value with the most recent date per user, this requires to order by date and take the first value. If your not reducing the result set per window function down to 1 row somehow, there is no point using it I guess
    – whme
    Dec 3, 2021 at 6:23
  • I more so meant, is there a way to avoid the repeated FIRST_VALUE() and PARTITION BY <x> ORDER BY <y> DESC on every value you want to pull?
    – Stevoisiak
    Dec 3, 2021 at 18:19
  • I think so.. but I am not sure. Maybe this would make a good SO question?
    – whme
    Dec 6, 2021 at 9:32
1

Ok, this might be either a hack or error-prone, but somehow this is working as well-

SELECT id, MAX(user) as user, MAX(time) as time, MAX(io) as io FROM lms_attendance GROUP BY id;
0
select b.* from 

    (select 
        `lms_attendance`.`user` AS `user`,
        max(`lms_attendance`.`time`) AS `time`
    from `lms_attendance` 
    group by 
        `lms_attendance`.`user`) a

join

    (select * 
    from `lms_attendance` ) b

on a.user = b.user
and a.time = b.time
2
  • thanks. i know i can do it using a subquery, but i was hoping to turn this into a view, and it won't allow subqueries in views AFAIK. would i have to turn each sub query into a view, etc.?
    – Keith
    Jun 11, 2013 at 7:20
  • join (select * from lms_attendance ) b = join lms_attendance b
    – azerafati
    Nov 12, 2016 at 15:14
0

I have tried one solution which works for me

    SELECT user, MAX(TIME) as time
      FROM lms_attendance
      GROUP by user
      HAVING MAX(time)
-1
 select result from (
     select vorsteuerid as result, count(*) as anzahl from kreditorenrechnung where kundeid = 7148
     group by vorsteuerid
 ) a order by anzahl desc limit 0,1
-1

I have done same thing like below

SELECT t1.* FROM lms_attendance t1 WHERE t1.id in (SELECT max(t2.id) as id FROM lms_attendance t2 group BY t2.user)

This will also reduce memory utilization.

Thanks.

-3

Possibly you can do group by user and then order by time desc. Something like as below

  SELECT * FROM lms_attendance group by user order by time desc;
-3

Try this query:

  select id,user, max(time), io 
  FROM lms_attendance group by user;
2
  • Try making a SQLFiddle of this. You will likely find that id and io are nonaggregated columns, which cannot be used in a group by. Aug 13, 2018 at 15:52
  • 1
    there is no guarantee id will be the id with max(time), it could be any of the ids within the group. this is the problem I came here to resolve, still looking
    – robisrob
    Oct 5, 2018 at 15:48
-3

This worked for me:

SELECT user, time FROM 
(
    SELECT user, time FROM lms_attendance --where clause
) AS T 
WHERE (SELECT COUNT(0) FROM table WHERE user = T.user AND time > T.time) = 0
ORDER BY user ASC, time DESC

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