I want to learn the advantages of using JavaScript prototype. Object prototype usage is increasing performance. I want to see this by usage of memory.

Case-1

    var Foo1 = function (name) {
        this.name = name;
        getFirstName = function() { return "name1"; };
        getLastName = function() { return "name2"; };
    };
    for (var i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
        var foo1 = new Foo1();
    }

Case-2

    var Foo2 = function (name) {
        this.name = name;
    };

    Foo2.prototype = {
        getFirstName: function () { return "name1"; },
        getLastName: function () { return "name2"; },
    };

    for (var i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
        var foo2 = new Foo2();
    }
  1. which case is using memory more than another?

  2. Can I learn memory usage of cases?

  3. What is the difference about memory usage of cases?

marked as duplicate by Felix Kling, Stewie, flavian, Nick Andriopoulos, Robert Jun 11 '13 at 11:23

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • This question has a few duplicates for sure. You can build your own tests here jsperf.com – elclanrs Jun 11 '13 at 7:14
  • 5
    Performance !== memory usage. – Fabrício Matté Jun 11 '13 at 7:15
  • 2
    Your first case will create global functions and not object properties! – Sirko Jun 11 '13 at 7:16

If you define a function or an object to belong to the prototype then it's shared by all instances and creating an object with new does not create it's own instance of the function/object. In this sense defining something to belong to the prototype uses less memory. The precise difference would be that case 1 (look at comments below because your definition is not proper) would create 1000 instances of each function. Case 2 (again look at the comments below) would create only 1 instance of each function.

However case 2 is not defining in the prototype. You're essentially redefining the prototype there. The correct usage would be:

function Foo2 (name) {
    this.name = name;
};

Foo2.prototype.getFirstName = function () { return "name1"; };
Foo2.prototype.getLastName = function () { return "name2"; };

Your case 1 is also not correctly defined in terms of what you're trying to achieve because getFirstName and getLastName are not defined through this (the instance).

The second case is more memory-efficient and performant. When you define methods in the constructor then the same functions or methods are allocated for each object so the object consumes more memory. So define methods in the prototype-object then all objects share the same methods only once.

So my advice is that you define attributes (number,string...) in the constructor and methods or functions in the prototype-object like you did it in the second case.

By the way when you define an object this way:

var Foo1 = function (name) {
    this.name = name;
    getFirstName = function() { return "name1"; };
    getLastName = function() { return "name2"; };
};

The method getFirstName and getLastName are properties of window, because you actually write this:

var Foo1 = function (name) {
    this.name = name;
    window.getFirstName = function() { return "name1"; };
    window.getLastName = function() { return "name2"; };
};

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