18

If I send a Signal from a module function (a django view function as it happens), that is not inside a Class, it's not obvious (to me) what the sender should be - if anything? Is sender=None appropriate in this case?

Alternatively, the function is invoked by an HTTP request, which I currently pass in as a separate argument - should I pass that instead?

Option A:

from django.dispatch import Signal
my_signal = Signal(
    providing_args=['my_arg', 'request']
)    

# this is a view function
def do_something(request):
    # ... do useful stuff
    my_signal.send(
        sender=None,
        my_arg="Hello",
        request=request
    )

Option B:

from django.dispatch import Signal
my_signal = Signal(
    providing_args=['my_arg']
)    

# this is a view function
def do_something(request):
    # ... do useful stuff
    my_signal.send(
        sender=request,
        my_arg="Hello",
    )

[UPDATE]

Option A has it. There's nothing useful that the receiver can do with the sender in this case (i.e. it's not an object), so set it to None.

12

The django.dispatch.Dispatcher source simply says it should be

"...[t]he sender of the signal. Either a specific object or None."

which then ties in with the receiver via connect(), for which the sender's significance is:

"The sender to which the receiver should respond. Must either be
 of type Signal, or None to receive events from any sender"

which, I admit, isn't particularly clear, but in your case, I would say to use sender=None because there's nothing concrete to hook to, as the request is transient.

0

A function is an object in Python, so you can just set the sender to be a reference your function, like this:

def my_func():
    my_signal.send(sender=my_func, my_arg="Hello")

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