594

I am creating a dictionary in a C# file with the following code:

private readonly Dictionary<string, XlFileFormat> FILE_TYPE_DICT
        = new Dictionary<string, XlFileFormat>
        {
            {"csv", XlFileFormat.xlCSV},
            {"html", XlFileFormat.xlHtml}
        };

There is a red line under new with the error:

Feature 'collection initilializer' cannot be used because it is not part of the ISO-2 C# language specification

Can anyone explain what is going on here?

I am using .NET version 2.

2
962

I can't reproduce this issue in a simple .NET 4.0 console application:

static class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var myDict = new Dictionary<string, string>
        {
            { "key1", "value1" },
            { "key2", "value2" }
        };

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

Can you try to reproduce it in a simple Console application and go from there? It seems likely that you're targeting .NET 2.0 (which doesn't support it) or client profile framework, rather than a version of .NET that supports initialization syntax.

6
  • 16
    The issue is the version of C# the OP is using, object/collection initializers weren't introduced until C# 3.0. The detail as to why it didn't work before has already been answered. – James Jun 11 '13 at 15:20
  • @James - Edited to indicate as such. – Haney Jun 11 '13 at 15:22
  • How do I check what version of C# I'm using or change it? – azrosen92 Jun 11 '13 at 15:33
  • 3
    The project's properties will indicate the target version of the framework. – Haney Jun 11 '13 at 15:35
  • 2
    @James - Not reliably, however, as this person may be picking up some legacy work in a solution that was targeting 2.0 and isn't aware of it, for example. – Haney Jun 11 '13 at 15:46
250
+250

With C# 6.0, you can create a dictionary in following way:

var dict = new Dictionary<string, int>
{
    ["one"] = 1,
    ["two"] = 2,
    ["three"] = 3
};

It even works with custom types.

3
  • 12
    For people more interested in this new syntax here is good blog post: marcin-chwedczuk.github.io/… – csharpfolk Jun 13 '16 at 9:00
  • 1
    This is perfect for inline declaration. – Tiramonium Sep 19 '17 at 12:20
  • I like your way betther, but take notes that it uses the exact same number of "boilerplate" characters per line (4) as the accepted answer with { "key2", "value2" }, – Maxter Sep 12 '18 at 15:50
39

You can initialize a Dictionary (and other collections) inline. Each member is contained with braces:

Dictionary<int, StudentName> students = new Dictionary<int, StudentName>
{
    { 111, new StudentName { FirstName = "Sachin", LastName = "Karnik", ID = 211 } },
    { 112, new StudentName { FirstName = "Dina", LastName = "Salimzianova", ID = 317 } },
    { 113, new StudentName { FirstName = "Andy", LastName = "Ruth", ID = 198 } }
};

See Microsoft Docs for details.

29

Suppose we have a dictionary like this

Dictionary<int,string> dict = new Dictionary<int, string>();
dict.Add(1, "Mohan");
dict.Add(2, "Kishor");
dict.Add(3, "Pankaj");
dict.Add(4, "Jeetu");

We can initialize it as follow.

Dictionary<int, string> dict = new Dictionary<int, string>  
{
    { 1, "Mohan" },
    { 2, "Kishor" },
    { 3, "Pankaj" },
    { 4, "Jeetu" }
};
1
  • The ReSharper answer. – Antony Booth May 22 '19 at 19:16
12

Object initializers were introduced in C# 3.0, check which framework version you are targeting.

Overview of C# 3.0

1

With С# 6.0

var myDict = new Dictionary<string, string>
{
    ["Key1"] = "Value1",
    ["Key2"] = "Value2"
};
1
  • 1
    Your answer (before it was edited by Turbcool) was an exact copy of the accepted answer by Haney. Please ensure future answers provide new solutions to questions. – TylerH Dec 8 '20 at 22:23
0

Code looks fine. Just try to change the. Net framework to v2.0+

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