12

What's the best way to create a non-NULL constraint in MySQL such that fieldA and fieldB can't both be NULL. I don't care if either one is NULL by itself, just as long as the other field has a non-NULL value. And if they both have non-NULL values, then it's even better.

6 Answers 6

8

This isn't an answer directly to your question, but some additional information.

When dealing with multiple columns and checking if all are null or one is not null, I typically use COALESCE() - it's brief, readable and easily maintainable if the list grows:

COALESCE(a, b, c, d) IS NULL -- True if all are NULL

COALESCE(a, b, c, d) IS NOT NULL -- True if any one is not null

This can be used in your trigger.

7

@Sklivvz: Testing with MySQL 5.0.51a, I find it parses a CHECK constraint, but does not enforce it. I can insert (NULL, NULL) with no error. Tested both MyISAM and InnoDB. Subsequently using SHOW CREATE TABLE shows that a CHECK constraint is not in the table definition, even though no error was given when I defined the table.

This matches the MySQL manual which says: "The CHECK clause is parsed but ignored by all storage engines."

So for MySQL, you would have to use a trigger to enforce this rule. The only problem is that MySQL triggers have no way of raising an error or aborting an INSERT operation. One thing you can do in the trigger to cause an error is to set a NOT NULL column to NULL.

CREATE TABLE foo (
  FieldA INT,
  FieldB INT,
  FieldA_or_FieldB TINYINT NOT NULL;
);

DELIMITER //
CREATE TRIGGER FieldABNotNull BEFORE INSERT ON foo
FOR EACH ROW BEGIN
  IF (NEW.FieldA IS NULL AND NEW.FieldB IS NULL) THEN
    SET NEW.FieldA_or_FieldB = NULL;
  ELSE
    SET NEW.FieldA_or_FieldB = 1;
  END IF;
END//

INSERT INTO foo (FieldA, FieldB) VALUES (NULL, 10); -- OK
INSERT INTO foo (FieldA, FieldB) VALUES (10, NULL); -- OK
INSERT INTO foo (FieldA, FieldB) VALUES (NULL, NULL); -- gives error

You also need a similar trigger BEFORE UPDATE.

5
  • Instead of using a NOT NULL column to force an error, you can do something like SET NEW.FieldA = 1/0 which will throw a division-by-zero error. Not a very useful error message, but at least you don't have to add special columns. I really wish MySQL supported proper CHECK constraints, or at least had a better way to throw errors from triggers. :(
    – friedo
    Dec 15, 2009 at 5:45
  • @friedo: Since the OP's question was about enforcing some special not-null conditions, I thought a null violation error message would be appropriate. Another trick you can do in a MySQL trigger is declare an integer variable in the trigger and try to assign a string to it. It raises an error message that includes the string you use. :) Dec 15, 2009 at 14:43
  • 2
    As of MySQL 5.5, you can raise errors. I added an answer accordingly: stackoverflow.com/a/28775560/2651243 Feb 27, 2015 at 22:43
  • @MichaelPlatings, thanks I gave you +1. FWIW, MySQL 5.5 wasn't in GA at the time I wrote my answer above in 2008. Feb 27, 2015 at 23:03
  • This was my originally accepted answer until MySQL 5.5 and @MichaelPlatings new answer. Just updating for posterity.
    – mpeters
    Apr 16, 2015 at 22:02
5

MySQL 5.5 introduced SIGNAL, so we don't need the extra column in Bill Karwin's answer any more. Bill pointed out you also need a trigger for update so I've included that too.

CREATE TABLE foo (
  FieldA INT,
  FieldB INT
);

DELIMITER //
CREATE TRIGGER InsertFieldABNotNull BEFORE INSERT ON foo
FOR EACH ROW BEGIN
  IF (NEW.FieldA IS NULL AND NEW.FieldB IS NULL) THEN
    SIGNAL SQLSTATE '45000'
    SET MESSAGE_TEXT = '\'FieldA\' and \'FieldB\' cannot both be null';
  END IF;
END//
CREATE TRIGGER UpdateFieldABNotNull BEFORE UPDATE ON foo
FOR EACH ROW BEGIN
  IF (NEW.FieldA IS NULL AND NEW.FieldB IS NULL) THEN
    SIGNAL SQLSTATE '45000'
    SET MESSAGE_TEXT = '\'FieldA\' and \'FieldB\' cannot both be null';
  END IF;
END//
DELIMITER ;

INSERT INTO foo (FieldA, FieldB) VALUES (NULL, 10); -- OK
INSERT INTO foo (FieldA, FieldB) VALUES (10, NULL); -- OK
INSERT INTO foo (FieldA, FieldB) VALUES (NULL, NULL); -- gives error
UPDATE foo SET FieldA = NULL; -- gives error
4

This is the standard syntax for such a constraint, but MySQL blissfully ignores the constraint afterwards

ALTER TABLE `generic` 
ADD CONSTRAINT myConstraint 
CHECK (
  `FieldA` IS NOT NULL OR 
  `FieldB` IS NOT NULL
) 
6
  • Since this is the standard SQL syntax, this should work with other SQL-based databases also. (It definitely works for PostgreSQL.)
    – Neall
    Oct 4, 2008 at 17:06
  • The MySQL manual says: "The CHECK clause is parsed but ignored by all storage engines." I tried it and it's true. Oct 4, 2008 at 17:23
  • It's even ignored for InnoDB tables? That sucks.
    – Neall
    Oct 4, 2008 at 19:14
  • Edited correspondingly. Please remove the downvote if you think the answer is now useful. Thanks,
    – Sklivvz
    Oct 4, 2008 at 19:37
  • I would have removed the downvote, but SO now tells me "this vote is too old to be undone or changed." Besides, although your answer is now truthful, it's not useful inasmuch as it doesn't solve the question asked by mpeters. :-) Oct 5, 2008 at 18:20
2

I've done something similar in SQL Server, I'm not sure if it will work directly in MySQL, but:

ALTER TABLE tableName ADD CONSTRAINT constraintName CHECK ( (fieldA IS NOT NULL) OR (fieldB IS NOT NULL) );

At least I believe that's the syntax.

However, keep in mind that you cannot create check constraints across tables, you can only check the columns within one table.

0

I accomplished this using a GENERATED ALWAYS column with COALESCE ... NOT NULL:

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `error`;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `error` (
    id BIGINT UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
    left_id BIGINT UNSIGNED NULL,
    right_id BIGINT UNSIGNED NULL,
    left_or_right_id BIGINT UNSIGNED GENERATED ALWAYS AS (COALESCE(left_id, right_id)) NOT NULL,
    when_occurred TIMESTAMP DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
    message_text LONGTEXT NOT NULL,
    INDEX id_index (id),
    INDEX when_occurred_index (when_occurred),
    INDEX left_id_index (left_id),
    INDEX right_id_index (right_id)
);

INSERT INTO `error` (left_id, right_id, message_text) VALUES (1, 1, 'Some random text.');  -- Ok.
INSERT INTO `error` (left_id, right_id, message_text) VALUES (null, 1, 'Some random text.'); -- Ok.
INSERT INTO `error` (left_id, right_id, message_text) VALUES (1, null, 'Some random text.'); -- Ok.
INSERT INTO `error` (left_id, right_id, message_text) VALUES (null, null, 'Some random text.'); -- ER_BAD_NULL_ERROR: Column 'left_or_right_id' cannot be null

on MySQL version 8.0.22

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