1

I need the user to enter a file and for as long as the user enters files that exist the file will loop. The program will break when the user enters a file that does not exist.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    string currentfile;
    int i = 0;
    do {
        cout << "Please enter a file name \n";
        cin >> currentfile;
        cout << currentfile << "\n";
        ifstream myfile(currentfile);
        if (myfile.good())
        {
            // display thenumber of characters, words, and lines in that file
            myfile.close();
        }
        else {
            cout << "break";
            break;
        }
        i++;
    } while(true);
    // repeat while user enters valid file name
}

when i enter a file that exists, myfile.good() returns good then if i try a file that does not exist the like myfile.good() returns true again. If i start the program and i try first a file that does not exist then myfile.good() returns false.

I do not know why after i enter a valid file myfile.good() will continue to return true.

2

What you want to check is this :

ifstream myfile(currentfile);
if (myfile) // myfile.is_open() is fine too...
{
    // display thenumber of characters, words, and lines in that file
    myfile.close();

}
else {
    cout << "break";
    break;
}

good() :

checks whether the stream is ready for input/output operations, other member functions exist to check for specific states of a stream (all of them return a bool value)

It checks state flags.

To test if a file was successfully opened, you would use :

myfile.is_open()

And then, if it was, you would perform checks like : eof(), ..., or good().

Example :

ifstream myfile(currentfile);
if (myfile.is_open())
{
    while ( myfile.good() ) // while ( !myfile.eof() ), ...
    {
        getline (myfile,line);
        cout << line << endl;
    }
    myfile.close();
}

This for more details.

  • This is mainly what my question is about and the problem i cant figure out. – user1082764 Jun 12 '13 at 0:23
  • 1
    Chances are, if you started with a valid file then changed to an invalid file, the stream is still ready for I/O. Which I would consider a bug, but hey, C++. – 2rs2ts Jun 12 '13 at 0:34
  • 1
    Yep, it's exactly that. good() only returns false when any of the following return true: bad(), fail(), and eof(). fail() is a superset of bad(), and returns true if a r/w operation fails or a format error happens - which will happen with an invalid file, but apparently the flag does not get re-set. Use clear() to reset the flags. – 2rs2ts Jun 12 '13 at 0:38

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.