41

I want to replace negative values in a pandas DataFrame column with zero.

Is there a more concise way to construct this expression?

df['value'][df['value'] < 0] = 0
2
  • 1
    That looks like how you'd do it in numpy ... I doubt there's a more concise way other than breaking it into 2 statements.
    – mgilson
    Jun 12, 2013 at 14:40
  • Maybe something like df['value'] = max((df['value'], 0))
    – John
    Jun 12, 2013 at 14:52

6 Answers 6

29

You could use the clip method:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
df = pd.DataFrame({'value': np.arange(-5,5)})
df['value'] = df['value'].clip(0, None)
print(df)

yields

   value
0      0
1      0
2      0
3      0
4      0
5      0
6      1
7      2
8      3
9      4
9
  • 2
    On a side note, you don't need the np.inf as the second argument. It defaults to None, which is equivalent, in this case. If you're concerned about readability with leaving the second argument out, you could use df.value.clip_lower(0) instead. Jun 12, 2013 at 14:52
  • For what it's worth, I assumed pandas.DataFrame.clip behaved like numpy as well. I only realized that it didn't (and you didn't need the second argument) about 5 minutes ago! :) Jun 12, 2013 at 14:55
  • @JoeKington: When df is a pandas.DataFrame, df['values'] is a pandas.Series, which is a subclass of ndarray.
    – unutbu
    Jun 12, 2013 at 14:56
  • True, but the clip method is different (has default parameters for lower and upper), and it has additional methods such as clip_lower and clip_upper. Jun 12, 2013 at 14:58
  • @JoeKington: Hm, my pandas appears to be too old then. In version 0.10.0, it inherits from numpy.clip.
    – unutbu
    Jun 12, 2013 at 14:59
24

Another possibility is numpy.maximum(). This is more straight-forward to read in my opinion.

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
df['value'] = np.maximum(df.value, 0)

It's also significantly faster than all other methods.

df_orig = pd.DataFrame({'value': np.arange(-1000000, 1000000)})

df = df_orig.copy()
%timeit df['value'] = np.maximum(df.value, 0)
# 100 loops, best of 3: 8.36 ms per loop

df = df_orig.copy()
%timeit df['value'] = np.where(df.value < 0, 0, df.value)
# 100 loops, best of 3: 10.1 ms per loop

df = df_orig.copy()
%timeit df['value'] = df.value.clip(0, None)
# 100 loops, best of 3: 14.1 ms per loop

df = df_orig.copy()
%timeit df['value'] = df.value.clip_lower(0)
# 100 loops, best of 3: 14.2 ms per loop

df = df_orig.copy()
%timeit df.loc[df.value < 0, 'value'] = 0
# 10 loops, best of 3: 62.7 ms per loop

(notebook)

3
  • i think this is good, the only bad thing is that np.max != np.maximum which makes this bad mnemonically
    – maxymoo
    Oct 30, 2016 at 23:14
  • @maxymoo I agree, they should have gone with the SQL GREATEST name to distinguish.
    – Max Ghenis
    Jul 12, 2018 at 23:11
  • Using np.fmax and np.amax in place of np.maximum and np.max can help avoid the confusion. Feb 8 at 22:36
20

Here is the canonical way of doing it, while not necessarily more concise, is more flexible (in that you can apply this to arbitrary columns)

In [39]: df = DataFrame(randn(5,1),columns=['value'])

In [40]: df
Out[40]: 
      value
0  0.092232
1 -0.472784
2 -1.857964
3 -0.014385
4  0.301531

In [41]: df.loc[df['value']<0,'value'] = 0

In [42]: df
Out[42]: 
      value
0  0.092232
1  0.000000
2  0.000000
3  0.000000
4  0.301531
4
  • Much more flexible (and less obscure). Jun 12, 2013 at 14:53
  • Though in some respects, the np.clip or np.max solutions are more easily read, I think this is the most precise answer to my original question. Jun 12, 2013 at 15:09
  • Would .ix be slightly better than .loc since .ix is the more general form? Or are there arguments in favor of loc over ix? - pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/…
    – A.Wan
    Jun 10, 2014 at 21:28
  • This is the slowest method of any answer here, ~7x slower than np.maximum as suggested in stackoverflow.com/a/33000983/1840471.
    – Max Ghenis
    Jul 12, 2018 at 22:56
2

Or where to check:

>>> import pandas as pd,numpy as np
>>> df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randn(5,1),columns=['value'])
>>> df
      value
0  1.193313
1 -1.011003
2 -0.399778
3 -0.736607
4 -0.629540
>>> df['value']=df['value'].where(df['value']>0,0)
>>> df
      value
0  1.193313
1  0.000000
2  0.000000
3  0.000000
4  0.000000
>>> 
1

For completeness, np.where is also a possibility, which is faster than most answers here. The np.maximum answer is the best approach though, as it's faster and more concise than this.

df['value'] = np.where(df.value < 0, 0, df.value)
0

Let's take only values greater than zero, leaving those which are negative as NaN (works with frames not with series), then impute.

df[df > 0].fillna(0)

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