1

I want use +new Date to compute a DOM manipulation time cost in javascript, like insert 240,000 DOM nodes

var t1 = +new Date();

var tbody = document.getElementsByTagName("tbody")[0];
for (var i = 0; i < 20000; i++) {
    var tr = document.createElement("tr");
    for (var t = 0; t < 6; t++) {
        var td = document.createElement("td");
        td.appendChild(document.createTextNode(i + "," + t));
        tr.appendChild(td);
    }
    tbody.appendChild(tr);
}

var t2 = +new Date();
console.log(t2 - t1);

when I run this code, the log show only about 1 second, but it actually cost more than 1 second, even more than 5 seconds

Why this happened? How can I compute this correct cost time?

  • If you're trying to test performance check out jsperf.com – elclanrs Jun 13 '13 at 6:41
  • @elclanrs: No, I just want to know why my code doesn't work, and how can I let it work – hh54188 Jun 13 '13 at 6:42
  • 5
    You're measuring the time that code took correctly. The other four seconds must be either before it, or after it (the browser rendering the result). Side note: If your goal is speed, you're probably better off building the structure outside the DOM (in a DocumentFragment or just a disconnected table) and then appending it all at once when you're done. For instance, this is dramatically faster than this in terms of the table actually appearing. – T.J. Crowder Jun 13 '13 at 6:43
  • 5
    You're measuring the time it takes to execute the code. In this extreme scenario the bottleneck is for the browser to carry out the task of showing the massive chunk of DOM nodes. You're accurately measuring the time it took to dispatch those thousands of appends. – David Hedlund Jun 13 '13 at 6:45
  • DOM changes can be delayed by the browser until the end of a function. Try to log the times before calling the dom insertions function and after the function call has been returned. – SHANK Jun 13 '13 at 6:52
2

You are correctly measuring the time it takes for that snippet of Javascript to run, however the browser has to do a lot of work to render the result.

If you set a timeout, you can let the browser render before completing the measurement:

var t1 = new Date();

var tbody = document.getElementsByTagName("tbody")[0];
for (var i = 0; i < 20000; i++) {
    var tr = document.createElement("tr");
    for (var t = 0; t < 6; t++) {
        var td = document.createElement("td");
        td.appendChild(document.createTextNode(i + "," + t));
        tr.appendChild(td);
    }
    tbody.appendChild(tr);
}

console.log("Script finished: ", new Date() - t1);
setTimeout(function() {
    console.log("Render complete: ", new Date() - t1);
});
  • Why add a timeout could work ? – hh54188 Jun 14 '13 at 2:15
  • The browser event loop lets currently running scripts execute before redrawing the page. The setTimeout effectively schedules a new code block to run after the pending paint changes. Also, if it works or this was helpful, please upvote/accept the answer. – Hamish Jun 16 '13 at 21:47
  • So setTimeout without a value, provides the browser enough time to complete its render and then display the time taken? – mike james Oct 10 '13 at 15:45
  • saying "enough time" is misleading. Javascript blocks rendering while it's executing. The 'setTimeout' effectively creates a script that will execute after the re-render, whenever that may be. It's not a matter of 'enough time', but of what is in the queue to be executed. – Hamish Oct 10 '13 at 21:48

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