9

Here is the C code:

struct node{
    void *value;
    struct node *next;
};

void g(void *p){
    /*...*/
}

void f(struct node *head, const int ok){
    struct node *p=head;

    while (p){
        /* ...
           code 1 
           ...
         */
        if (ok!=0){
            g(p->value);
        }
        p=p->next;
    }
}

I used gcc to compile this code. If I compiled with -O, would it optimize function f like this:

void f(struct node *head, const int ok){
    struct node *p=head;

    if (ok!=0){
        while (p){
            /* ...
               code 1 
               ...
             */
            g(p->value);
            p=p->next;
        }
    }
    else{
        while (p){
            /* ...
               code 1 
               ...
             */
            p=p->next;
        }
    }
}
  • It could hoist it out of the loop. Why not check? – Hasturkun Jun 13 '13 at 9:36
  • 1
    You can instruct most compilers to show you the assembly code. So you can check that yourself fairly easily. – Joey Jun 13 '13 at 9:39
  • 1
    "Would compiler optimize XYZ" - well, what did you deduce from the generated asembly (which you have checked before asking, right?) – user529758 Jun 13 '13 at 9:40
  • Also, this smells very well like premature optimization. – user529758 Jun 13 '13 at 9:40
  • 1
    @alk, haha, yes. Although even though the man page says that, I'm not sure if it would do it in all cases. There's probably a heuristic that decides if it's worth the waste of space or not. – Shahbaz Jun 13 '13 at 9:48
16

That would greatly depend on how big /* code 1 */ is. If it is very small, it might. But if it is anything above a few lines, it most probably won't. Duplicating a large amount of code for every single if would have terrible effects on the performance. In fact, that may happen with very aggressive optimization and certainly not just with -O. From the man page of gcc (emphasis mine):

-O
-O1 ...

With -O, the compiler tries to reduce code size and execution time, without performing any optimizations that take a great deal of compilation time.

So reducing code is also part of optimization.

-O2 Optimize even more. GCC performs nearly all supported optimizations that do not involve a space-speed tradeoff. As compared to -O, this option increases both compilation time and the performance of the generated code.

So -O2 wouldn't do what you want either.

-O3 Optimize yet more. -O3 turns on all optimizations specified by -O2 and also turns on the -finline-functions, -funswitch-loops, -fpredictive-commoning, -fgcse-after-reload, -ftree-vectorize and -fipa-cp-clone options.

Now we have to look at these options to see if any of them might do what you want:

-funswitch-loops
Move branches with loop invariant conditions out of the loop, with duplicates of the loop on both branches (modified according to result of the condition).

Voila! With -O3 you get the optimization you want.

  • +1 for through explanation and referencing the man pages. But I would like to add that if all OP really wants is to unswitch-loops, they can just use -funswitch-loops without -O3. – user2752635 Aug 7 '17 at 19:37
2

Well, that depends on many things.

Since, you are using gcc, you can always check if it did for a particular program by invoking gcc -o -S fileName.c

2

In these kind of situations I find this website http://gcc.godbolt.org/ quite useful

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