3

Please consider this silly example:

if (1..3) { "true" }

The above produces the output true.

My question: How does the if statement handle a case like this where multiple values are output by the conditional? Is the "true" output the result of the "3" (the last case)? Or is some other logic at work? Thanks.

  • 3
    I don't see why this was downvoted. I think this is a valid question pointing to something that is not well documented in powershell. – Davor Josipovic Jun 13 '13 at 10:17
  • +1 @davor Thank you for the support. – Sabuncu Jun 13 '13 at 10:57
2

The above produces the output true, as expected.

Why do you expect it to output "true"?

How does the if statement handle a case like this where multiple values are output by the conditional?

The conditional does not "output" any values. It always evaluates to "true" or "false". The question remaining is, why does it evaluate to true (or false).

The code

   if (1..3) { "true" }

is equal to

   if (@(1,2,3)) { "true" }

is equal to

   $array = @(1,2,3)
   if ($array) { "true" }

behaves as

   if ($array.Length -gt 0) { "true" }

So not individual elements are tested, but rather if the array contains any elements.

For example, the following will not print "true":

   if (@()) { "true" }

Update If the array contains only one value, it looks (I coudn't find any normative documentation on that), as if the array is treated as a scalar value using the one element inside.

So

   if (@(0)) 
   if (@(0.0)) 
   if (@(1)) 
   if (@(-1)) 
   if (,$null)) 
   if (,"false")) 

is treated as

   if (0)  --> false
   if (0.0)  --> false
   if (1)  --> true
   if (-1)  --> true
   if ($null)  --> false
   if ("false") --> true
  • 1
    Not true... @(0).length = 1 but try if (@(0)) { "true" } and see what you get. – Davor Josipovic Jun 13 '13 at 10:34
  • 1
    Well not completely false also. It looks like a corner case. See my update. – Christian.K Jun 13 '13 at 10:48
  • +1 Thank you Christian.K for your explanation. It seems @(0) is treates as a special case (or corner case as you put it). – Sabuncu Jun 13 '13 at 11:00
  • What does the comma prefix do in the last two case? – Sabuncu Jun 13 '13 at 11:01
  • 1
    It is just a different way of creating an array. See here. – Christian.K Jun 13 '13 at 11:19
4

The observed behavior is explained (to some extent) in this blog post. Basically, if an expression evaluates to 0 it's interpreted as false, otherwise as true. Examples:

0      => False
1      => True
"0"    => True (because it's a string of length 1)
""     => False (because it's a string of length 0)
@()    => False
@(0)   => False (this one's a little surprising)
@(0,1) => True
@("0") => True
  • +1 Ansgar, thank you for your explanation. – Sabuncu Jun 13 '13 at 11:06
  • You say: "if an expression evaluates to 0" -> how is the "evaluation" accomplished? – Sabuncu Jun 13 '13 at 11:14
  • +1 interesting link. – Christian.K Jun 13 '13 at 11:22
  • 1
    @Sabuncu I'm not familiar with PowerShell's inner workings, so I can't explain how exactly PowerShell evaluates particular expressions. That is a question you need to ask the developers. – Ansgar Wiechers Jun 13 '13 at 11:36
  • +1 OK, thank you again. – Sabuncu Jun 13 '13 at 11:41
1

1..3 results in an array with 3 items

PS> (1..3).GetType()

IsPublic IsSerial Name                                     BaseType
-------- -------- ----                                     --------
True     True     Object[]                                 System.Array

PS> (1..3).Length
3

If there is at least one item in the array the if considers it true

PS> if (@()) { "true" } else { "false" }
false

PS> if (@(1)) { "true" } else { "false" }
true

PS> if (@(1,2)) { "true" } else { "false" }
true
  • 1
    Not true... @(0).length = 1 but try if (@(0)) { "true" } and see what you get. – Davor Josipovic Jun 13 '13 at 10:34
  • +1 Lars, thank you for your explanation. – Sabuncu Jun 13 '13 at 10:59
  • @davor: You are correct, that is something I cannot explain – Lars Truijens Jun 13 '13 at 17:50

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