6

I have a quick question regarding the AWK command. I need the command to print until the end of the line on the same line, but then when it gets to the next line I need it to print on another line. The following example will provide better clarity.

Say I have a file:

0 1 2 3 This is line one
0 1 2 3 This is line two 
0 1 2 3 This is line three 
0 1 2 3 This is line four

I have tried the following and gotten the following results

awk '{for(i=5;i<=NF;i++) print $i}' fileName >> resultsExample1

I get the following in resultsExample1

This
is
line
one
This 
is 
line 
two 
And so on....

Example 2:

awk 'BEGIN {" "} {for(i=5;i<=NF;i++) printf $1}' fileName >> resultsExample2

for resultsExample2 I get:

This is line one This is line two this is line three This is line four

I have also tried:

awk 'BEGIN {" "} {for(i=5;i<=NF;i++) printf $1}' fileName >> resultsExample3

But the results were the same as the previous one

In the end I want the following:

This is line one
This is line two 
This is line three
This is line four

I'm grateful for any help! Thanks in advance :)

  • 2
    In the example, all the lines have the same number of columns - is this always the case with your input? – Matt LaFave Jun 13 '13 at 15:53
8

It may be more straight-forward to use cut:

$ cut -d' ' -f5- file
This is line one
This is line two 
This is line three 
This is line four

This says: on space-separated fields, print from the 5th up to the end of the line.

If you happen to have multiple spaces in between fields, you may initially want to squeeze them with tr -s' '.

  • 6
    This will only work if there are is only exactly one space between fields. – Scrutinizer Jun 13 '13 at 16:52
  • 3
    That's true, @Scrutinizer, but in case there were more than one we could firstly pipe | tr -s ' ' to delete multiple spaces. – fedorqui Jun 13 '13 at 19:12
  • How would you handle this if the number of spaces (the delimiter) varied from one record to the next? For example applying this to the output of ls -l? – gone Jun 29 '16 at 13:53
  • @gone I should see this in more detail, but parsing ls is not a good idea. – fedorqui Jun 29 '16 at 14:05
  • @fedorqui, I didn't mean to divert the conversation to the topic of whether parsing ls is a good idea or not. The point is that in some outputs, the delimiter can be elastic. – gone Jun 30 '16 at 20:31
10

I know this question is very old, but another awk example:

awk '{print substr($0,index($0,$5))}' fileName

What it does: find the index where you want to start printing (index of $5 in $0) and print the substring of $0 starting at that index.

  • 1
    It may be late to the party, but it worked great for me. +1 =) – Terrance Apr 3 '16 at 5:32
8

OR with awk

awk '{$1=$2=$3=$4=""; sub(/^  */,"", $0); print }'  awkTest2.txt
This is line one
This is line two
This is line three
This is line four

Also, you're solution is almost there, you just need to force a '\n' to be printed at the end of each processed line, i.e.

awk '{for(i=5;i<=NF;i++) {printf $i " "} ; printf "\n"}' awkTest2.txt
This is line one
This is line two
This is line three
This is line four

Note that your BEGIN { " " } is a no op. And you should use $i instead of $1 to print the current iterations value.

IHTH.

Edit ; Noting sudo_O objection, I added a %s to the data. Here is the output

This is line one
This is line two
This is line three
T%shis is line four

This may be a problem for you, so it that case read about how to pass a format string to printf.

  • 2
    You should not use printf without specifying the format. What do you think will happen if one the fields contains %s for example? – Chris Seymour Jun 13 '13 at 16:08
  • I agree with sudo_O. You should get awk: not enough args in printf(T%shis ) for example.. – Scrutinizer Jun 13 '13 at 16:44
  • 1
    I'm got making up my output. Good luck to all. – shellter Jun 13 '13 at 17:00
  • Thank you for giving me a solution using awk as well! – ola Jun 13 '13 at 17:30
0

awk '{gsub (/[[:digit:]]/,"");{$1=$1}}1' file

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