38

Consider

try:
   import someProprietaryModule
except ImportError:
   raise ImportError('It appears that <someProprietaryModule> is not installed...')

When run, if someProprietaryModule is not installed, one sees:

(traceback data)
ImportError: unknown module: someProprietaryModule

During handling of the above exception, another exception occurred:

(traceback data)
ImportError: It appears that <someProprietaryModule> is not installed...

Perhaps I don't want the "During handling of the above exception..." line (and the lines above it) to appear. I could do this:

_moduleInstalled = True
try:
   import someProprietaryModule
except ImportError:
   _moduleInstalled = False
if not _moduleInstalled: 
   raise ImportError('It appears that <someProprietaryModule> is not installed...')

But that feels like a bit of a hack. What else might I do?

1

3 Answers 3

69

In Python 3.3 and later raise ... from None may be used in this situation.

try:
   import someProprietaryModule
except ImportError:
   raise ImportError('It appears that <someProprietaryModule> is not installed...') from None

This has the desired results.

2
  • Was just about to post the same thing. See also PEP3134.
    – Aya
    Commented Jun 13, 2013 at 16:16
  • 5
    PEP 409 is what added the from None syntax. Commented Jun 25, 2014 at 21:31
3

This can be done like this in Python 2.7 and Python 3:

try:
    import someProprietaryModule
except ImportError as e:
    raised_error = e

if isinstance(raised_error, ImportError):
    raise ImportError('It appears that <someProprietaryModule> is not installed...')
1
  • What if there was no ImportError? In that case, raised_error wouldn't be defined so you will get a NameError.
    – TheLizzard
    Commented Jun 12 at 15:11
-1

You can try logging module as well

Original Answer: Perhaps I don't want the "During handling of the above exception..." line (and the lines above it) to appear.

import logging

try:
    import someProprietaryModule
    
except Exception as e:
    
    if hasattr(e, 'message'):
        logging.warning('python2')
        logging.error(e.message)
        
    else:
        
        logging.warning('python3')
        logging.error('It appears that <someProprietaryModule> is not installed...')

gives

WARNING:root:python3
ERROR:root:It appears that <someProprietaryModule> is not installed...

[Program finished]

Edit:

import logging

class MyExceptionType(Exception):
    """Base class for other exceptions"""
    pass

try:
    from someProprietaryModule import *
except Exception as e:
        logging.warning('python3')
        logging.exception("Failed to import <someProprietaryModule>. Is it installed?", exc_info=False)
        raise MyExceptionType from e

logging.exception will emit the stacktrace alongside the localized error message, which makes it quite useful.

Casting an exception to a string to print it removes 90% of the useful information.

Silently suppressing exceptions is almost always an error and is most commonly a footgun.

Edit 2:

import logging

class MyExceptionType(Exception):
    """Base class for other exceptions"""
    pass

try:
    import someProprietaryModule
    
except Exception as e:
    error_message = "Failed to import <someProprietaryModule>. Is it installed?"
    logging.warning('python3')
    logging.error(error_message, exc_info=True)  # Log the stacktrace along with the message
    raise MyExceptionType(error_message) from e

The exc_info parameter in the logging.error call is set to True, allowing the logging module to include the exception information, including the traceback, in the log output. The localized error message is stored in a variable error_message, which makes the code more readable and allows for easy changes if needed.

10
  • An error message is not the same thing as an exception. The main difference is that execution continues. So in your script, if you put, say, print('got here') after that code, the output will contain got here. Or, more on-topic, if you put someProprietaryModule.do_a_thing(), you'll get NameError: name 'someProprietaryModule' is not defined.
    – wjandrea
    Commented May 9, 2022 at 22:44
  • I thought the objective is to intercept the import error and raise a different error. This code only handles exceptions when importing. If you catch an exception but don't reraise it, it is suppressed.
    – Subham
    Commented May 10, 2022 at 4:28
  • "intercept the import error and raise a different error." -- Yes, the problem is that your code doesn't raise anything. (At least not before your edit.) "This code only handles exceptions when importing." -- It doesn't really handle them, it only logs them. "If you catch an exception but don't reraise it, it is suppressed." -- Which is exactly the problem I'm pointing out, although at least at least you're logging it.
    – wjandrea
    Commented May 10, 2022 at 4:36
  • is it OK now, or requires more work?
    – Subham
    Commented May 10, 2022 at 7:28
  • Well the first snippet still doesn't raise anything...
    – wjandrea
    Commented May 10, 2022 at 16:05

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