34

I've been trying to work out how to create a FluentValidation rule that checks if the instance of an object it's validating is not null, prior to validating it's properties.

I'd rather encapsulate this null validation in the Validator rather then doing it in the calling code.

See example code below with comments where the required logic is needed:

namespace MyNamespace
{
    using FluentValidation;

    public class Customer
    {
        public string Surname { get; set; }
    }

    public class CustomerValidator: AbstractValidator<Customer> 
    {
        public CustomerValidator() 
        {
            // Rule to check the customer instance is not null.

            // Don't continue validating.

            RuleFor(c => c.Surname).NotEmpty();
        }
    }

    public class MyClass
    {
        public void DoCustomerWork(int id)
        {
            var customer = GetCustomer(id);
            var validator = new CustomerValidator();

            var results = validator.Validate(customer);

            var validationSucceeded = results.IsValid;
        }

        public Customer GetCustomer(int id)
        {
            return null;
        }
    }
}

So my question is how do I check in the CustomerValidator() constructor that the current instance of customer is not null and abort further rule processing if it is null?

Thanks in advance.

  • 2
    Override the Validate method? – Matthew Jun 13 '13 at 19:53
  • So have an extension method that checks if it's null first before calling the base Validate() method? – Bern Jun 13 '13 at 19:56
  • No, see my answer below. You would call it as you would any other validator. – Matthew Jun 13 '13 at 20:00
  • The latest answer to this is to override the PreValidate() method. Code example below. – camainc Oct 12 '18 at 17:25
28

You should be able to override the Validate method in your CustomerValidator class.

public class CustomerValidator: AbstractValidator<Customer> 
{
    // constructor...

    public override ValidationResult Validate(Customer instance)
    {
        return instance == null 
            ? new ValidationResult(new [] { new ValidationFailure("Customer", "Customer cannot be null") }) 
            : base.Validate(instance);
    }
}
  • You could even cut it down to this: return instance == null ? new ValidationResult(new [] { new ValidationFailure("Customer", "Customer cannot be null") }) : base.Validate(instance); – Bern Jun 13 '13 at 20:03
  • 3
    I'm using the latest version of FluentValidation and the Validate() doesn't even fire for me. This doesn't appear to be possible anymore. – Sergey Akopov Mar 19 '15 at 21:58
  • @SergeyAkopov I don't understand how Validate doesn't fire since you would be the one calling the validate method. – Matthew Mar 20 '15 at 13:17
  • This didn't work for me on 6.2.0 as I am calling ValidateAndThrow extension method. It blows up before even getting to my overridden Validate method.. – Lee Campbell May 9 '16 at 7:04
  • 1
    As of 8.1.3 (link), it looks like you can override the PreValidate() method if you want to implement custom logic to handle null models that are passed to the validator. – Mass Dot Net Feb 6 at 21:05
16

I can't really test that right now, but you can either try to override Validate, or include the rules in the When block:

public CustomerValidator()
{
     When(x => x != null, () => {
         RuleFor(x => x.Surname).NotEmpty();
         //etc.
     });
}
  • Nice, but is there a way I can apply a validation message to it, i.e. .WithMessage("Customer does not exist."); ? – Bern Jun 13 '13 at 19:58
  • 1
    @Bern Maybe you could do RuleFor(x => x).NotNull().WithMessage("Customer does not exist");, but outside the When block? – Patryk Ćwiek Jun 13 '13 at 20:00
  • Thanks mate, yeah I tried that and it threw an exception. I think @Matthew managed to nail it above. – Bern Jun 13 '13 at 20:01
  • 1
    Alright, I guess then that overriding Validate is the best way to go here – Patryk Ćwiek Jun 13 '13 at 20:01
  • Thanks for your time mate. – Bern Jun 13 '13 at 20:04
6

For those using version >6.2.1 you need to override this signature instead, in order to achieve the same as @chrispr:

public override ValidationResult Validate(ValidationContext<T> context)
{
    return (context.InstanceToValidate == null) 
        ? new ValidationResult(new[] { new ValidationFailure("Property", "Error Message") })
        : base.Validate(context);       
}
  • 3
    This method neither not fired for WebApi. – Maybe Aug 7 '16 at 1:38
2

I inherited from the fluent AbstractValidator and created a NullReferenceAbstractValidator class instead:

public class NullReferenceAbstractValidator<T> : AbstractValidator<T>
{
    public override ValidationResult Validate(T instance)
    {
        return instance == null
            ? new ValidationResult(new[] { new ValidationFailure(instance.ToString(), "response cannot be null","Error") })
            : base.Validate(instance);
    }
}

and then inherited from that class with each validator that needed a null reference check:

public class UserValidator : NullReferenceAbstractValidator<User>
  • 13
    why are you doing instance.ToString() when instance is null? – pomber May 23 '15 at 17:34
2

As the above solutions didn't work for me (FluentValidation, Version=6.2.1.0 for Net45), I am posting what I did. This is just a simple replacement/wrapper for ValidateAndThrow extension method.

public static class ValidatorExtensions
{
    public static void ValidateAndThrowNotNull<T>(this IValidator<T> validator, T instance)
    {
        if (instance == null)
        {
            var validationResult = new ValidationResult(new[] { new ValidationFailure("", "Instance cannot be null") });
            throw new ValidationException(validationResult.Errors);
        }
        validator.ValidateAndThrow(instance);
    }
}
2

This is an older post, but want to update the answers to include the following from the FluentValidation documentation:

Using PreValidate

If you need to run specific code every time a validator is invoked, you can do this by overriding the PreValidate method. This method takes a ValidationContext as well as a ValidationResult, which you can use to customise the validation process.

public class MyValidator : AbstractValidator<Person> {
  public MyValidator() {
    RuleFor(x => x.Name).NotNull();
  }

  protected override bool PreValidate(ValidationContext<Person> context, ValidationResult result) {
    if (context.InstanceToValidate == null) {
      result.Errors.Add(new ValidationFailure("", "Please ensure a model was supplied."));
      return false;
    }
    return true;
  }
}

https://fluentvalidation.net/start#using-prevalidate

1

Use the Cascade mode.

Here is the example from the documentation.

RuleFor(x => x.Surname).Cascade(CascadeMode.StopOnFirstFailure).NotNull().NotEqual("foo");

Also from the documentation:

If the NotNull validator fails then the NotEqual validator will not be executed. This is particularly useful if you have a complex chain where each validator depends on the previous validator to succeed.

1

Override EnsureInstanceNotNull as below

protected override void EnsureInstanceNotNull(object instanceToValidate)
{
    if(instanceToValidate==null)
      throw new ValidationException("Customer can not be null");
}
1

By means of Custom(). It can be also very helpful when validation of another field is based on validation of your current field.

ruleBuilder.Custom((obj, context) =>
        {
            if (obj != null)
            {
                var propertyName = <field where should be validation>;
                context.AddFailure(propertyName, "'Your field name' Your validation message.");
            }
        });

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