95

Is there any method to replace values with None in Pandas in Python?

You can use df.replace('pre', 'post') and can replace a value with another, but this can't be done if you want to replace with None value, which if you try, you get a strange result.

So here's an example:

df = DataFrame(['-',3,2,5,1,-5,-1,'-',9])
df.replace('-', 0)

which returns a successful result.

But,

df.replace('-', None)

which returns a following result:

0
0   - // this isn't replaced
1   3
2   2
3   5
4   1
5  -5
6  -1
7  -1 // this is changed to `-1`...
8   9

Why does such a strange result be returned?

Since I want to pour this data frame into MySQL database, I can't put NaN values into any element in my data frame and instead want to put None. Surely, you can first change '-' to NaN and then convert NaN to None, but I want to know why the dataframe acts in such a terrible way.

Tested on pandas 0.12.0 dev on Python 2.7 and OS X 10.8. Python is a pre-installed version on OS X and I installed pandas by using SciPy Superpack script, for your information.

6
  • Does the write_frame not parse NaNs to nones? Jun 13 '13 at 21:36
  • Yup. You encounter InternalError: (1054, u"Unknown column 'nan' in 'field list'") error. I don't know about any solutions on it other than converting NaN to None before executing write_frame method.
    – Blaszard
    Jun 13 '13 at 21:40
  • What version of pandas are you using? Jun 13 '13 at 21:41
  • Scipy super pack gives out dev? Ok, well I definitely think you should raise this as an issue on github, shouldn't be too hard to fix. Jun 13 '13 at 21:49
  • If you are reading this data from CSV/Excel, you can read these values in as NaN using na_values argument. More information in this answer.
    – cs95
    Apr 29 '19 at 10:11
121

Actually in later versions of pandas this will give a TypeError:

df.replace('-', None)
TypeError: If "to_replace" and "value" are both None then regex must be a mapping

You can do it by passing either a list or a dictionary:

In [11]: df.replace('-', df.replace(['-'], [None]) # or .replace('-', {0: None})
Out[11]:
      0
0  None
1     3
2     2
3     5
4     1
5    -5
6    -1
7  None
8     9

But I recommend using NaNs rather than None:

In [12]: df.replace('-', np.nan)
Out[12]:
     0
0  NaN
1    3
2    2
3    5
4    1
5   -5
6   -1
7  NaN
8    9
10
  • 17
    Or simply a list, e.g. df.replace(['-'], [None]), or df.replace({'-': None}), I think. The use of None as a sentinel precludes using it as a value too..
    – DSM
    Jun 13 '13 at 21:30
  • @user2360798 replace is actually a very feature-rich (read complicated) function, the (dev)docstring is really good though. Jun 13 '13 at 21:40
  • 4
    I don't know if it's obvious, but had to assign df back to itself like: df = df.replace({'?': np.nan}) Sep 26 '16 at 0:22
  • 3
    @AndyHayden df.replace('-', df.replace(['-'], [None]) looks funky, is that a typo?
    – lin_bug
    Mar 17 '17 at 11:11
  • 2
    @lin_bug Though it seems the no longer works in recent pandas versions. df.where(df!='-', None) works Mar 17 '17 at 14:13
27

I prefer the solution using replace with a dict because of its simplicity and elegance:

df.replace({'-': None})

You can also have more replacements:

df.replace({'-': None, 'None': None})

And even for larger replacements, it is always obvious and clear what is replaced by what - which is way harder for long lists, in my opinion.

1
  • 1
    It is worth noting that part of why this technique works is that usage of the dict type in to_replace causes the method parameter to not be evaluated, and thus the method='pad' default to have no ill effects.
    – bsplosion
    Aug 24 '20 at 18:29
17

where is probably what you're looking for. So

data=data.where(data=='-', None) 

From the panda docs:

where [returns] an object of same shape as self and whose corresponding entries are from self where cond is True and otherwise are from other).

1
  • 5
    This is actually inaccurate. data=data.where(data=='-', None) will replace anything that is NOT EQUAL to '-' with None. Pandas version of where keeps the value of the first arg(in this case data=='-'), and replace anything else with the second arg (in this case None). It is a bit confusing as np.where is more explicit in that it asks the conditional in the first arg, then the if true in the second arg, then the if false in the 3rd arg.
    – clg4
    Jul 4 '17 at 23:10
10

Before proceeding with this post, it is important to understand the difference between NaN and None. One is a float type, the other is an object type. Pandas is better suited to working with scalar types as many methods on these types can be vectorised. Pandas does try to handle None and NaN consistently, but NumPy cannot.

My suggestion (and Andy's) is to stick with NaN.

But to answer your question...

pandas >= 0.18: Use na_values=['-'] argument with read_csv

If you loaded this data from CSV/Excel, I have good news for you. You can quash this at the root during data loading instead of having to write a fix with code as a subsequent step.

Most of the pd.read_* functions (such as read_csv and read_excel) accept a na_values attribute.

file.csv

A,B
-,1
3,-
2,-
5,3
1,-2
-5,4
-1,-1
-,0
9,0

Now, to convert the - characters into NaNs, do,

import pandas as pd
df = pd.read_csv('file.csv', na_values=['-'])
df

     A    B
0  NaN  1.0
1  3.0  NaN
2  2.0  NaN
3  5.0  3.0
4  1.0 -2.0
5 -5.0  4.0
6 -1.0 -1.0
7  NaN  0.0
8  9.0  0.0

And similar for other functions/file formats.

P.S.: On v0.24+, you can preserve integer type even if your column has NaNs (yes, talk about having the cake and eating it too). You can specify dtype='Int32'

df = pd.read_csv('file.csv', na_values=['-'], dtype='Int32')
df

     A    B
0  NaN    1
1    3  NaN
2    2  NaN
3    5    3
4    1   -2
5   -5    4
6   -1   -1
7  NaN    0
8    9    0

df.dtypes

A    Int32
B    Int32
dtype: object

The dtype is not a conventional int type... but rather, a Nullable Integer Type. There are other options.


Handling Numeric Data: pd.to_numeric with errors='coerce

If you're dealing with numeric data, a faster solution is to use pd.to_numeric with the errors='coerce' argument, which coerces invalid values (values that cannot be cast to numeric) to NaN.

pd.to_numeric(df['A'], errors='coerce')

0    NaN
1    3.0
2    2.0
3    5.0
4    1.0
5   -5.0
6   -1.0
7    NaN
8    9.0
Name: A, dtype: float64

To retain (nullable) integer dtype, use

pd.to_numeric(df['A'], errors='coerce').astype('Int32')

0    NaN
1      3
2      2
3      5
4      1
5     -5
6     -1
7    NaN
8      9
Name: A, dtype: Int32 

To coerce multiple columns, use apply:

df[['A', 'B']].apply(pd.to_numeric, errors='coerce').astype('Int32')

     A    B
0  NaN    1
1    3  NaN
2    2  NaN
3    5    3
4    1   -2
5   -5    4
6   -1   -1
7  NaN    0
8    9    0

...and assign the result back after.

More information can be found in this answer.

3
df = pd.DataFrame(['-',3,2,5,1,-5,-1,'-',9])
df = df.where(df!='-', None)
2

With Pandas version ≥1.0.0, I would use DataFrame.replace or Series.replace:

df.replace(old_val, pd.NA, inplace=True)

This is better for two reasons:

  1. It uses pd.NA instead of None or np.nan.
  2. It replaces the value in-place which could be more memory efficient.
0

Setting null values can be done with np.nan:

import numpy as np
df.replace('-', np.nan)

Advantage is that df.last_valid_index() recognizes these as invalid.

0

Using replace and assigning a new df:

import pandas as pd
df = pd.DataFrame(['-',3,2,5,1,-5,-1,'-',9])
dfnew = df.replace('-', 0)
print(dfnew)


(venv) D:\assets>py teste2.py
   0
0  0
1  3
2  2
3  5
4  1
5 -5
0
df.replace('-', np.nan).astype("object")

This will ensure that you can use isnull() later on your dataframe

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.