10

I was reading C++ Primer and I noticed that there's a statement says:

Because references are not objects, they don't have addresses. Hence, we may not define a pointer to a reference.

But I just wrote an example code and shows that it's possible to create a pointer to a reference (the d variable).

The code is posted below:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main(){
   int a = 1024;

   int &b = a; // a reference to int
   int &c = b; // a reference to another reference
   int *d = &b; // a pointer to a reference
   int *(&e) = d; // a reference to a pointer 

   a = 100;
   cout << b << endl;
   cout << c << endl;
   cout << *d << endl;
   cout << *e << endl;
}

So, anything wrong with my test? Or the statement in C++ Primer is wrong?

I'm reading C++ Primerfifth edition. The statement is in page 52, 2.3.2.

  • @taocp oops, edited :-) – yegle Jun 13 '13 at 21:43
  • 2
    Switch e to int &(*e) = d; and you get error: cannot declare pointer to ‘int&’ from GCC. That makes it pretty clear that d is not a pointer to a reference. – chris Jun 13 '13 at 21:51
  • Think of a reference as an alias to the original object. References don't alloc, dealloc memory. As has been pointed out you can point to the object referenced by the alias name, but there's nothing in memory to represent the alias itself (it's only in code). By contrast a pointer allocates memory and stores a value (even if the value is NULL). – Seth Hays Jun 13 '13 at 22:06
  • included pointers and reference tag to this question. – keelar Jun 13 '13 at 22:06
10

The quote is right, since you're making a pointer pointing to the original object, not its reference. The code below shows this fact:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main() {
  int a = 0;
  // two references referring to same object
  int& ref1_a = a;
  int& ref2_a = a;
  // creating a different pointer for each reference
  int* ptr_to_ref1 = &ref1_a;
  int* ptr_to_ref2 = &ref2_a;

  printf("org: %p 1: %p 2: %p\n", &a, ptr_to_ref1, ptr_to_ref2);

  return 0;
}

output:

org: 0x7fff083c917c 1: 0x7fff083c917c 2: 0x7fff083c917c

If you said you're able to make a pointer for reference, then the above output should be different.

  • 1
    Change the printf to printf("0: %X 1: %X 2: %X\n", &a, ptr_to_ref1, ptr_to_ref2); would make it more obvious :-) – yegle Jun 13 '13 at 21:54
  • 2
    Joining the usual stackoverflow nitpicking, the printf should have %p placeholders, not %x (64-bit pointers vs. 32-bit ints, yada yada). +1 anyway for a good explanation. – Yamodax Jun 13 '13 at 21:56
  • @yegle: Nice point. I have included this in my sample code. Thank you! – keelar Jun 13 '13 at 21:56
  • @Shimodax: thank you for pointing that out! I didn't know the %p argument before. Thank you! – keelar Jun 13 '13 at 21:59
7

What the book says is correct. Your pointer is pointing to a, not to the reference itself (b) because the reference itself (b) does not exist in memory as such and has thus no address.

  • 3
    The reference might have memory, for example if it's passed into a function - the compiler may implement it as a pointer internally. That implementation is not exposed to you though. – Mark Ransom Jun 13 '13 at 21:47
5

No, you can't make a pointer to a reference. If you use the address-of operator & on it you get the address of the object you're referencing, not the reference itself.

0

Think of a reference as an alias to the original object. References don't alloc, dealloc memory. As has been pointed out you can point to the object referenced by the alias name, but there's nothing in memory to represent the alias itself (it's only in code). By contrast a pointer allocates memory and stores a value (even if the value is NULL).

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