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I have multiple threads updating a single array in tight loops. (10 threads on a dual-core processor @ roughly 100000 updates per second). Each time the array is updated under the protection of a mutex (WaitForSingleObject / ReleaseMutex). I have noticed that no thread ever does two consecutive updates to the array which means there must be some sort of yield relating to the synchronization. This means there are about 100000 context switches happening every second which seems sub-optimal. Why does this happen ?

  • what is the priority of each thread? – Kevin MOLCARD Jun 14 '13 at 9:53
  • All threads are identical priority – Funky Oordvork Jun 14 '13 at 9:56
  • how are you calling WaitForSingleObject exactly? Specially, what time-out are you giving to it? If you are using INFINITE, I guess this will be the expected behavior – Kevin MOLCARD Jun 14 '13 at 10:00
  • I am using infinite but I would expect each thread to use up its timeslice (many consecutive updates before context switch) – Funky Oordvork Jun 14 '13 at 10:09
  • Maybe this is because of the multi processor. When the first thread (running on the first processor) release the mutex, the second thread (on the second processor) got it, then when the first thread try to get the mutex, it can not. When the mutex is finally released by the second thread, it is taken by the third thread (on the first processor). – Kevin MOLCARD Jun 14 '13 at 10:14
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The problem here is that there is an order of all waiting threads.

Each thread blocked in a WaitForSingleObject goes into a queue and is then suspended by the scheduler so that it does not eat up execution time anymore. When the mutex is freed, one of the waiting threads is resumed by the scheduler. It is unspecified what the exact order is in which threads are wakened from the queue, but in many cases it will be a simple first-in, first-out.

What happens now is that if the same thread releases the mutex and then does another WaitForSingleObject on the same mutex, he is going to be re-inserted into the queue and it is quite unlikely that he will be inserted at the front of the queue if there are already other threads waiting. This makes sense, as allowing him to skip to the front of the queue could lead to other threads starving. So the scheduler will probably just suspend him and wake the the thread that is at the front of the queue instead.

  • Are you saying that the scheduler runs every time a call to ReleaseMutex is made ? – Funky Oordvork Jun 14 '13 at 10:31
  • Not necessarily. But your thread will have to wait for the scheduler whenever he calls a WaitForSingleObject and there are already other threads waiting for the same mutex. – ComicSansMS Jun 14 '13 at 10:33
  • But it will only have to wait for the scheduler if the mutex is taken by another thread ? – Funky Oordvork Jun 14 '13 at 10:36
  • That depends on the implementation. The syscall triggered by WaitForSingleObject would be allowed to return early in this case, but that is just an optimization. However, if he did return early if there are threads waiting that would cause unfair scheduling. The first case is a matter of efficiency, the latter is one of correctness. – ComicSansMS Jun 14 '13 at 10:42
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I guess this is because of the multi processor.

When the first thread (running on the first processor) release the mutex, the second thread (on the second processor) got it, then when the first thread try to get the mutex, it can not. When the mutex is finally released by the second thread, it is taken by the third thread (on the first processor).

  • A waiting thread should not get scheduled at all on modern operating systems. The scheduler knows that the thread cannot continue as long as the mutex is locked, so he won't assign any timeslice to it. Try it yourself: Spinning on a this_thread::yield() in C++ will always waste a full CPU core, while calling lock() on a mutex or wait() on a condition_variable will not. – ComicSansMS Jun 14 '13 at 10:38
  • @ComicSansMS: I have read your answer and that's what I expected but was not sure. All the WaitForSingleObject are in a queue so a thread will be after all the other thread after he calls ReleaseMutex. That's also why I asked @FunkyOordvork if he has access to single core machine. – Kevin MOLCARD Jun 14 '13 at 10:43
  • @ComicSansMS you are right, a waiting thread is not running, so the scheduler must be running every time there is a release, which does seem sub-optimal, but that might just be down to my lack of knowledge ! – Funky Oordvork Jun 14 '13 at 10:49
  • It would indeed be interesting to check whether the behavior is the same when using only one core. A few calls to SetThreadAffinityMask should do the trick. – ComicSansMS Jun 14 '13 at 10:50
  • @FunkyOordvork An operating systems engineer might argue that your use of mutexes is sub-optimal instead ;) Why release the mutex in the first place if you have to re-lock it right away? You can probably get around the whole issue by restructuring your code in a way that this situation no longer occurs. – ComicSansMS Jun 14 '13 at 10:57

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