5

This seems like something that I should have thought about before now, but it itn't. It also seems like there should be an existing way to do this.

The problem: Say I have a class with a couple of constructors

public class ModuleAction
{
    public ModuleAction(string url, string caption)
    { ... }

    public ModuleAction(string url, ModuleAction action)
    { ... }
}

And then elsewhere, I make a call to one of those constructors, but the second argument is null, it does not know which constructor to use

ModuleAction action = new ModuleAction("http://google.co.uk", null);

Is there any way of doing this? My current solution is to add an unused argument to one of the constructors, but that doesn't seem right.

My solution: (not pretty)

public class ModuleAction
{
    public ModuleAction(string url, string caption, bool unused)
    { ... }

    public ModuleAction(string url, ModuleAction action)
    { ... }
}
7
  • 2
    If you pass null then it shouldn't matter which constructor gets called, because you're only passing the url.
    – NoPyGod
    Commented Jun 14, 2013 at 11:21
  • 2
    You can cast the null to be the appropriate type. Commented Jun 14, 2013 at 11:21
  • 1
    well, I would simply use an empty string instead of null
    – Najzero
    Commented Jun 14, 2013 at 11:23
  • @NoPyGod: absolutely not true!! The first overload might use an empty caption instead of a default; the second might use no action instead of a default. You could code so that what you say is true, but you absolutely can't assume it!
    – Dan Puzey
    Commented Jun 14, 2013 at 11:25
  • @TheWaxMann: can you create a new constructor overload with only one parameter?
    – Dan Puzey
    Commented Jun 14, 2013 at 11:26

6 Answers 6

12

There are several options here.

The simple, direct solution is to cast the null to they type of the argument in the overload you wish to use:

ModuleAction action = new ModuleAction("http://google.co.uk", (string)null);

A better option would be to use a new constructor that has a single parameter and to chain it, using defaults:

public ModuleAction(string url) : this(url, "")
8
  • This answer is the essence of the first three comments ;) Commented Jun 14, 2013 at 11:25
  • 2
    @TimSchmelter - Good thing it predates two of those ;)
    – Oded
    Commented Jun 14, 2013 at 11:26
  • @Oded Thanks, I didn't know you could cast a null value. I have used chaining before, but didn't know you could use the format you have used for it. What version of .net did that come in?
    – Andrew
    Commented Jun 14, 2013 at 11:37
  • Just had a further thought about this, when I call this(url, null) it still will not know which one I am trying to use, so do I still need to cast the null ie this(url, (ModuleAction)null)
    – Andrew
    Commented Jun 14, 2013 at 11:43
  • @TheWaxMann - but with an overload, you just use this(url).
    – Oded
    Commented Jun 14, 2013 at 11:47
6

You can cast null to expected parameter type.

new ModuleAction(url, (string) null);

new ModuleAction(url, (ModuleAction) null);
4

You can use casting for this:

new ModuleAction("http://google.co.uk", (ModuleAction)null);
3

You have three options:

  1. You can cast the null to be the appropriate type.
  2. You can provide a constructor that only takes one argument and use that instead of passing null.
  3. You can use named parameters.
2

Create a Constructor which will not have the second argument.

public ModuleAction(string url) 
{ ... }

Then it's clear which one will be used if 2nd argument cannot be supplied.

2

How about

new ModuleAction("uu", (string)null);
new ModuleAction("uu", (ModuleAction)null);

?

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