4

Why DateTimeToMilliseconds in DateUtils.pas is marked as internal? Can I use it?

{ Internal, converts a date-time to milliseconds }
function DateTimeToMilliseconds(const ADateTime: TDateTime): Int64;
var
  LTimeStamp: TTimeStamp;
begin
  LTimeStamp := DateTimeToTimeStamp(ADateTime);
  Result := LTimeStamp.Date;
  Result := (Result * MSecsPerDay) + LTimeStamp.Time;
end;

[Delphi XE]


I have found this on About.com:

Experience shows that creating two TDateTime values using the function and EncodeDateTime that are distant from each other only a millisecond, the function returns a MillisecondsBetween not return as was expected, proving that it is not accurate.

So, if I don't care about few milisecs, I should use it.

3
  • 2
    What version of Delphi are you using? The DateUtils unit had a major overhaul in XE that made these functions all extremely accurate down to the millisecond. – Nick Hodges Jun 14 '13 at 14:20
  • I have Delphi XE Professional – Z80 Jun 14 '13 at 14:22
  • That About.com article refers to an old version of Delphi - I couldn't see a date, but probably Delphi 7. If you follow the links in it you eventually end up in a QC report showing the exact code you're quoting as a fix! It has subsequently been added to Delphi, as noted by @NickHodges above and me below. – David Jun 14 '13 at 14:56
7

The TDateTime is a floating point double. To minimize rounding errors when working with TDateTime values, most calculations in DateUtils converts the TDateTime to milliseconds.

Later when calculations are ready the Int64 value is converted back to a TDateTime value again.

The internal marking is to emphasize that this function is an implementation detail, not to be utilized outside the library. That is, when working with TDateTime values, use the public functions/procedures.

This is a little test of the function MilliSecondsBetween:

program TestMSecBetween;
{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses 
  System.SysUtils,System.DateUtils;

var
  d1,d2 : TDateTime;
  i,iSec,iMin,iHour,iMSec;
  isb : Int64;
begin
  d1 := EncodeDateTime(2013,6,14,0,0,0,0);
  for i := 0 to 1000*60*60*24-1 do
  begin
    iHour := (i div (1000*60*60)) mod 24;
    iMin := (i div (1000*60)) mod 60;
    iSec := (i div 1000) mod 60;
    iMSec := i mod 1000;
    d2 := EncodeDateTime(2013,6,14,iHour,iMin,iSec,iMSec);
    isb := MilliSecondsBetween(d2,d1);
    if (isb <> i) then
      WriteLn(i:10,iHour:3,iMin:3,iSec:3,iMSec:4,isb:3);
  end;
  ReadLn;
end.

You can expand the test for more than one day to see if there are some anomalies.

5
  • 3
    For more information see this Delphi.about.com article where it mentions the source of this method, a proposal by John Herbster for improving the accuracy of the date/time methods. If you want to use this method yourself, make a local copy. Don't edit the original DateUtils.pas for something as minor as this. – David Jun 14 '13 at 14:05
  • > Experience shows that creating two TDateTime values using the function and EncodeDateTime that are distant from each other only a millisecond, the function returns a MillisecondsBetween not return as was expected, proving that it is not accurate. --------------------------------------- so if I don't care about few milisec I can use it? – Z80 Jun 14 '13 at 14:15
  • You can copy the function and use it, yes. But first make sure that it is really necessary. Most practical ways to work with TDateTime values should be covered by SysUtils and DateUtils. – LU RD Jun 14 '13 at 14:22
  • 1
    Please note that since Delphi-2009 (I think) the accuracy of DateUtils calculations was improved (much by the work of John Herbster). – LU RD Jun 14 '13 at 14:28
  • 1
    @NickHodges is correct, Delphi-XE has the improved DateUtils library. It can also be found here, DateUtils.pas. – LU RD Jun 14 '13 at 17:42
1

There's no reason you could not use it, it is not deprecated and used internally.

It's just marked as 'internal' because the function header is not in the interface section. If you copy the header there it should work.

What we always do if we 'patch' a third-party unit like this, is copying it to a directory in our own search path (named PatchLibs) before modifying. That way you can't 'damage' the original file and you don't have to worry about how to rebuild the original units.

1
  • Don't edit the VCL / RTL source for something as minor as this! You should be very cautious editing the VCL source - you miss out on updates and patches and can cause compatibility issues. Do it only for major, important bug fixes that cannot be solved any other way. For something like this, just make a copy of the method somewhere else. – David Jun 14 '13 at 14:07

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.