21

I need to add two columns to a database table in SQL Server 2008 R2:

  • createTS - date and time when row is inserted
  • updateTS - date and time when row is updated

I have a few questions:

  1. What column data type should I employ for each of these?
  2. createTS needs to be set only once, when the row is inserted. When I tried the datetime type for this column and added a Default Value or Binding of getdate(), the column value was appropriately set. Is this the best way to fulfill the purpose of this column? I considered timestamp data type, but that is, in my opinion, nearly a misnomer!
  3. updateTS needs to be set to the date and time of the moment when the row is updated. In SQL Server, there is no ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP (as in MySQL), so it looks like I have to resort to using a trigger. Is this right and how would I go about doing that?

So there is a starting point for anyone who would like to answer this question, here is the create table script:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[names]
(
    [name] [nvarchar](64) NOT NULL,
    [createTS] [datetime] NOT NULL CONSTRAINT [DF_names_createTS]  DEFAULT (getdate()),
    [updateTS] [datetime] NOT NULL,
    CONSTRAINT [PK_names] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
    (
        [name] ASC
    )
    WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [PRIMARY]
  • 3
    Side note: you should not make your clustered key (a) this wide (nvarchar(64) = 128 bytes!!) and it's also (b) not advisable to make it a variable length column (since those have additional overhead). A good clustering key would be narrow, unique, static (doesn't change), and ideally ever-increasing - an INT IDENTITY is almost perfect, anything more than 8-16 bytes is horrendously bad as a clustering key... – marc_s Jun 14 '13 at 20:21
20

try

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Names]
(
    [Name] [nvarchar](64) NOT NULL,
    [CreateTS] [smalldatetime] NOT NULL CONSTRAINT CreateTS_DF DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
    [UpdateTS] [smalldatetime] NOT NULL

)

PS I think a smalldatetime is good enough. You may decide differently.

Can you not do this at the "moment of impact" ?

In Sql Server, this is common:

Update dbo.MyTable 
Set 

ColA = @SomeValue , 
UpdateDS = CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
Where...........

Sql Server has a "timestamp" datatype.

But it may not be what you think.

Here is a reference:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms182776(v=sql.90).aspx

Here is a little RowVersion (synonym for timestamp) example:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Names]
(
    [Name] [nvarchar](64) NOT NULL,
    RowVers rowversion ,
    [CreateTS] [datetime] NOT NULL CONSTRAINT CreateTS_DF DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
    [UpdateTS] [datetime] NOT NULL

)


INSERT INTO dbo.Names (Name,UpdateTS)
select 'John' , CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
UNION ALL select 'Mary' , CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
UNION ALL select 'Paul' , CURRENT_TIMESTAMP

select *  ,  ConvertedRowVers = CONVERT(bigint,RowVers) from [dbo].[Names]

Update dbo.Names Set Name = Name

select *  ,  ConvertedRowVers = CONVERT(bigint,RowVers) from [dbo].[Names]

Maybe a complete working example:

DROP TABLE [dbo].[Names]
GO


CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Names]
(
    [Name] [nvarchar](64) NOT NULL,
    RowVers rowversion ,
    [CreateTS] [datetime] NOT NULL CONSTRAINT CreateTS_DF DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
    [UpdateTS] [datetime] NOT NULL

)

GO

CREATE TRIGGER dbo.trgKeepUpdateDateInSync_ByeByeBye ON dbo.Names
AFTER INSERT, UPDATE
AS

BEGIN

Update dbo.Names Set UpdateTS = CURRENT_TIMESTAMP from dbo.Names myAlias , inserted triggerInsertedTable where 
triggerInsertedTable.Name = myAlias.Name

END


GO






INSERT INTO dbo.Names (Name,UpdateTS)
select 'John' , CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
UNION ALL select 'Mary' , CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
UNION ALL select 'Paul' , CURRENT_TIMESTAMP

select *  ,  ConvertedRowVers = CONVERT(bigint,RowVers) from [dbo].[Names]

Update dbo.Names Set Name = Name , UpdateTS = '03/03/2003' /* notice that even though I set it to 2003, the trigger takes over */

select *  ,  ConvertedRowVers = CONVERT(bigint,RowVers) from [dbo].[Names]

Matching on the "Name" value is probably not wise.

Try this more mainstream example with a SurrogateKey

DROP TABLE [dbo].[Names]
GO


CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Names]
(
    SurrogateKey int not null Primary Key Identity (1001,1),
    [Name] [nvarchar](64) NOT NULL,
    RowVers rowversion ,
    [CreateTS] [datetime] NOT NULL CONSTRAINT CreateTS_DF DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
    [UpdateTS] [datetime] NOT NULL

)

GO

CREATE TRIGGER dbo.trgKeepUpdateDateInSync_ByeByeBye ON dbo.Names
AFTER UPDATE
AS

BEGIN

   UPDATE dbo.Names
    SET UpdateTS = CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
    From  dbo.Names myAlias
    WHERE exists ( select null from inserted triggerInsertedTable where myAlias.SurrogateKey = triggerInsertedTable.SurrogateKey)

END


GO






INSERT INTO dbo.Names (Name,UpdateTS)
select 'John' , CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
UNION ALL select 'Mary' , CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
UNION ALL select 'Paul' , CURRENT_TIMESTAMP

select *  ,  ConvertedRowVers = CONVERT(bigint,RowVers) from [dbo].[Names]

Update dbo.Names Set Name = Name , UpdateTS = '03/03/2003' /* notice that even though I set it to 2003, the trigger takes over */

select *  ,  ConvertedRowVers = CONVERT(bigint,RowVers) from [dbo].[Names]
  • Doing this at the moment of impact is ideal, but from an application perspective, that warrants changes in many places. I would rather handle that at the database level... because it is perceived as a responsibility of the database to keep track of that information. – Web User Jun 14 '13 at 20:33
  • Then you're stuck with a trigger, as you suspect...as far as I know. If you go that route, make sure you write "set based" trigger code, not "row by row" trigger code. – granadaCoder Jun 14 '13 at 20:35
  • Okay... I don't know the distinction between set-based and row by row based trigger code. – Web User Jun 14 '13 at 20:37
  • Look at the accepted answer at this question : stackoverflow.com/questions/662010/… – granadaCoder Jun 14 '13 at 20:39
  • In an nutshell, you see the INSERT I do above with John,Mary,Paul. The trigger is going to run ONCE for that single INSERT (because I'm using 'union all', but all 3 rows will be available to you in the trigger code. When I do the UPDATE "set name = name", the trigger is going to fire ONCE for that statement......as well. – granadaCoder Jun 14 '13 at 20:42
2

As an alternative to using a trigger, you might like to consider creating a stored procedure to handle the INSERTs that takes most of the columns as arguments and gets the CURRENT_TIMESTAMP which it includes in the final INSERT to the database. You could do the same for the CREATE. You may also be able to set things up so that users cannot execute INSERT and CREATE statements other than via the stored procedures.

I have to admit that I haven't actually done this myself so I'm not at all sure of the details.

  • The existing stored procedures are an extension to the application's business logic, so there are many of those that need to be updated. That is why triggers may be a preferable approach, as much as I dislike employing them for this very fundamental use case. – Web User Jun 14 '13 at 21:42

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