78

I have a TcpClient which I use to send data to a listener on a remote computer. The remote computer will sometimes be on and sometimes off. Because of this, the TcpClient will fail to connect often. I want the TcpClient to timeout after one second, so it doesn't take much time when it can't connect to the remote computer. Currently, I use this code for the TcpClient:

try
{
    TcpClient client = new TcpClient("remotehost", this.Port);
    client.SendTimeout = 1000;

    Byte[] data = System.Text.Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(this.Message);
    NetworkStream stream = client.GetStream();
    stream.Write(data, 0, data.Length);
    data = new Byte[512];
    Int32 bytes = stream.Read(data, 0, data.Length);
    this.Response = System.Text.Encoding.Unicode.GetString(data, 0, bytes);

    stream.Close();
    client.Close();    

    FireSentEvent();  //Notifies of success
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    FireFailedEvent(ex); //Notifies of failure
}

This works well enough for handling the task. It sends it if it can, and catches the exception if it can't connect to the remote computer. However, when it can't connect, it takes ten to fifteen seconds to throw the exception. I need it to time out in around one second? How would I change the time out time?

95

You would need to use the async BeginConnect method of TcpClient instead of attempting to connect synchronously, which is what the constructor does. Something like this:

var client = new TcpClient();
var result = client.BeginConnect("remotehost", this.Port, null, null);

var success = result.AsyncWaitHandle.WaitOne(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1));

if (!success)
{
    throw new Exception("Failed to connect.");
}

// we have connected
client.EndConnect(result);
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    what's the point of using asynchronous connect, and "synchronize" it back with Wait? I mean, i currently trying to understand how to implement timeout with asynchronous read, but the solution is not by completely disable the asynchronous design. should use socket timeouts or cancellation token or something like that. otherwise, just use connect/read instead... – RoeeK Nov 24 '14 at 20:27
  • 5
    @RoeeK: The point is what the question says: to programmatically select an arbitrary timeout for the connection attempt. This is not an example on how to do async IO. – Jon Nov 24 '14 at 21:05
  • 7
    @RoeeK: The whole point of this question is that TcpClient does not offer a sync connect function with a configurable timeout, which is one of your proposed solutions. This is a workaround to enable it. I'm not sure what else to say without repeating myself. – Jon Nov 25 '14 at 19:29
  • you're absolutely right. I've probably seen too many "WaitOnes" on async operations where it's really not needed.. – RoeeK Nov 26 '14 at 11:51
  • 2
    @JeroenMostert thanks for pointing this out, but let's keep in mind this is not production-grade code. People, please don't copy paste code that comes with the comment "something like this" in your production system. =) – Jon May 7 '18 at 9:12
81

Starting with .NET 4.5, TcpClient has a cool ConnectAsync method that we can use like this, so it's now pretty easy:

var client = new TcpClient();
if (!client.ConnectAsync("remotehost", remotePort).Wait(1000))
{
    // connection failure
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Additional benefit in ConnectAsync is that Task.Wait can accept a CancellationToken to stop immediately in case of need even before the timeout. – Ilia Barahovski Jun 23 '15 at 7:23
  • 8
    .Wait will synchronously block, removing any benefit of the "Async" portion. stackoverflow.com/a/43237063/613620 is a better fully asynchronous implementation. – Tim P. May 30 '17 at 19:52
  • 8
    @TimP. where have you seen the word "async" in the question? – Simon Mourier May 30 '17 at 19:54
  • I think it is a good answer, I would however return return client.Connected; My test cases shown that waiting alone is not enough for a definitive answer – Walter Vehoeven Apr 28 '18 at 20:37
  • 1
    You just reduced my response time for 10 clients from 28 seconds to 1.5 seconds!!! Awesome! – JeffS Jul 12 '18 at 14:31
16

Another alternative using https://stackoverflow.com/a/25684549/3975786:

var timeOut = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5);     
var cancellationCompletionSource = new TaskCompletionSource<bool>();
try
{
    using (var cts = new CancellationTokenSource(timeOut))
    {
        using (var client = new TcpClient())
        {
            var task = client.ConnectAsync(hostUri, portNumber);

            using (cts.Token.Register(() => cancellationCompletionSource.TrySetResult(true)))
            {
                if (task != await Task.WhenAny(task, cancellationCompletionSource.Task))
                {
                    throw new OperationCanceledException(cts.Token);
                }
            }

            ...

        }
    }
}
catch(OperationCanceledException)
{
    ...
}
| improve this answer | |
  • This is the correct fully asynchronous implementation. – Tim P. May 30 '17 at 19:53
  • 1
    Why is it not possible to use a Task.Delay to create a task that completes after a certain time instead of using the CancellationTokenSource/TaskCompletionSource for providing the delay? (I tried and it locks, but I don't understand why) – Daniel Jul 26 '17 at 17:26
  • When is task canceled? Sure this unblocks the called after the time out but isn't ConnectAsync() still running on the thread pool somewhere? – TheColonel26 Mar 6 '19 at 19:58
  • I'd also like to know the answer to @MondKin 's question too – TheColonel26 Mar 6 '19 at 20:00
8

One thing to take note of is that it is possible for the BeginConnect call to fail before the timeout expires. This may happen if you are attempting a local connection. Here's a modified version of Jon's code...

        var client = new TcpClient();
        var result = client.BeginConnect("remotehost", Port, null, null);

        result.AsyncWaitHandle.WaitOne(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1));
        if (!client.Connected)
        {
            throw new Exception("Failed to connect.");
        }

        // we have connected
        client.EndConnect(result);
| improve this answer | |
7

The answers above don't cover how to cleanly deal with a connection that has timed out. Calling TcpClient.EndConnect, closing a connection that succeeds but after the timeout, and disposing of the TcpClient.

It may be overkill but this works for me.

    private class State
    {
        public TcpClient Client { get; set; }
        public bool Success { get; set; }
    }

    public TcpClient Connect(string hostName, int port, int timeout)
    {
        var client = new TcpClient();

        //when the connection completes before the timeout it will cause a race
        //we want EndConnect to always treat the connection as successful if it wins
        var state = new State { Client = client, Success = true };

        IAsyncResult ar = client.BeginConnect(hostName, port, EndConnect, state);
        state.Success = ar.AsyncWaitHandle.WaitOne(timeout, false);

        if (!state.Success || !client.Connected)
            throw new Exception("Failed to connect.");

        return client;
    }

    void EndConnect(IAsyncResult ar)
    {
        var state = (State)ar.AsyncState;
        TcpClient client = state.Client;

        try
        {
            client.EndConnect(ar);
        }
        catch { }

        if (client.Connected && state.Success)
            return;

        client.Close();
    }
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for the elaborated code. Is it possible to get the SocketException thrown if the connect call fails before timeout? – Macke Feb 24 '15 at 9:06
  • It already should. The WaitOne will release when either the Connect call completes (successfully or otherwise) or the timeout elapses, whichever happens first. The check for !client.Connected will raise the exception if the connect "failed fast". – Adster Feb 25 '15 at 12:24
3

Set ReadTimeout or WriteTimeout property on the NetworkStream for synchronous reads/writes. Updating OP's code:

try
{
    TcpClient client = new TcpClient("remotehost", this.Port);
    Byte[] data = System.Text.Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(this.Message);
    NetworkStream stream = client.GetStream();
    stream.WriteTimeout = 1000; //  <------- 1 second timeout
    stream.ReadTimeout = 1000; //  <------- 1 second timeout
    stream.Write(data, 0, data.Length);
    data = new Byte[512];
    Int32 bytes = stream.Read(data, 0, data.Length);
    this.Response = System.Text.Encoding.Unicode.GetString(data, 0, bytes);

    stream.Close();
    client.Close();    

    FireSentEvent();  //Notifies of success
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    // Throws IOException on stream read/write timeout
    FireFailedEvent(ex); //Notifies of failure
}
| improve this answer | |
1

Here is a code improvement based on mcandal solution. Added exception catching for any exception generated from the client.ConnectAsync task (e.g: SocketException when server is unreachable)

var timeOut = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5);     
var cancellationCompletionSource = new TaskCompletionSource<bool>();

try
{
    using (var cts = new CancellationTokenSource(timeOut))
    {
        using (var client = new TcpClient())
        {
            var task = client.ConnectAsync(hostUri, portNumber);

            using (cts.Token.Register(() => cancellationCompletionSource.TrySetResult(true)))
            {
                if (task != await Task.WhenAny(task, cancellationCompletionSource.Task))
                {
                    throw new OperationCanceledException(cts.Token);
                }

                // throw exception inside 'task' (if any)
                if (task.Exception?.InnerException != null)
                {
                    throw task.Exception.InnerException;
                }
            }

            ...

        }
    }
}
catch (OperationCanceledException operationCanceledEx)
{
    // connection timeout
    ...
}
catch (SocketException socketEx)
{
    ...
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    ...
}
| improve this answer | |
1

If using async & await and desire to use a time out without blocking, then an alternative and simpler approach from the answer provide by mcandal is to execute the connect on a background thread and await the result. For example:

Task<bool> t = Task.Run(() => client.ConnectAsync(ipAddr, port).Wait(1000));
await t;
if (!t.Result)
{
   Console.WriteLine("Connect timed out");
   return; // Set/return an error code or throw here.
}
// Successful Connection - if we get to here.

See the Task.Wait MSDN article for more info and other examples.

| improve this answer | |
1

As Simon Mourier mentioned, it's possible to use ConnectAsync TcpClient's method with Task in addition and stop operation as soon as possible.
For example:

// ...
client = new TcpClient(); // Initialization of TcpClient
CancellationToken ct = new CancellationToken(); // Required for "*.Task()" method
if (client.ConnectAsync(this.ip, this.port).Wait(1000, ct)) // Connect with timeout of 1 second
{

    // ... transfer

    if (client != null) {
        client.Close(); // Close the connection and dispose a TcpClient object
        Console.WriteLine("Success");
        ct.ThrowIfCancellationRequested(); // Stop asynchronous operation after successull connection(...and transfer(in needed))
    }
}
else
{
    Console.WriteLine("Connetion timed out");
}
// ...

Also, I would recommended checking the AsyncTcpClient C# library with some examples provided like Server <> Client.

| improve this answer | |

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