4

I'm wondering if there is an elegant way in Ruby to come up with all permutations (with repetitions) of some integers with the requirements that 1) Integers introduced must be in ascending order from left to right 2) Zero is exempt from this rule.

Below, I have a subset of the output for three digits and the integers 0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9. This is only a subset of the total answer, and specifically it is the subset which starts with 5. I've included notes on a couple of them

500  - Zero is used twice
505  - 5 is used twice.  Note that 504 is not included because 5 was introduced on the left  and 4 < 5
506
507
508
509
550
555
556
557
558
559
560
565 - Though 5 < 6, 5 can be used twice because 5 was introduced to the left of 6.
566
567
568
569
570
575
577
578 
579
580
585
588
589
590
595
599

I need to be able to do it for arbitrarily long output lengths (not just 3, like this example), and I need to be able to do it for specific sets of integers. However, zero will always be the integer to which the ordering rule does not apply.

  • Hm one interesting property is that any valid "permutation" of length n has a valid "permutation" of length n-1. Basically, you can't make a "bad" permutation into a "good" by adding another digit (this is true by contradiction). So an easy solution (not elegant yet) is to first deal with permutations with 0. Then separately compute all n-1 permutations recursively. Filling in the last digit is easy, but not performant... it's a start. – rliu Jun 15 '13 at 6:26
  • Thanks roliu. Sawa, good to know - I may have gotten the terminology wrong. – crdzoba Jun 15 '13 at 6:32
  • @sawa Mm actually the distinguishing quality of combinations is that they don't care about order. Regardless, I don't think either term is right. I would just call them sequences with special properties. – rliu Jun 15 '13 at 6:34
  • Reading the question again, it looks more complicated than I initially thought. – sawa Jun 15 '13 at 6:34
  • Yeah I was just referring to them as "orderings" personally but used permutation in the question. – crdzoba Jun 15 '13 at 6:35
1

This would work:

class Foo
  include Comparable
  attr :digits

  def initialize(digits)
    @digits = digits.dup
  end

  def increment(i)
    if i == -1                     # [9,9] => [1,0,0]
      @digits.unshift 1
    else
      succ = @digits[i] + 1
      if succ == 10                # [8,9] => [9,0]
        @digits[i] = 0
        increment(i-1)
      else
        @digits[i] = @digits[0,i].sort.detect { |e| e >= succ } || succ
      end
    end
    self
  end

  def succ
    Foo.new(@digits).increment(@digits.length-1)
  end

  def <=>(other)
    @digits <=> other.digits
  end

  def to_s
    digits.join
  end

  def inspect
    to_s
  end

end

range = Foo.new([5,0,0])..Foo.new([5,9,9])
range.to_a
#=> [500, 505, 506, 507, 508, 509, 550, 555, 556, 557, 558, 559, 560, 565, 566, 567, 568, 569, 570, 575, 577, 578, 579, 580, 585, 588, 589, 590, 595, 599]

The main rule for incrementing a digit is:

@digits[i] = @digits[0,i].sort.detect { |e| e >= succ } || succ

This sorts the digits left to the current digit (the ones "introduced to the left") and detects the first element that's equal or larger than the successor. If none if found, the successor itself is used.

1

In case you need this as an executable:

#!/usr/bin/env ruby -w

def output(start, stop)
  (start..stop).select do |num|
    digits = num.to_s.split('').to_a
    digits.map! { |d| d.to_i }
    checks = []
    while digit = digits.shift
      next          if digit == 0
      next          if checks.find { |d| break true if digit == d }
      break false   if checks.find { |d| break true if digit <  d }
      checks << digit
    end != false
  end
end

p output(*$*[0..1].map { |a| a.to_i })

$ ./test.rb 560 570
[560, 565, 566, 567, 568, 569, 570]
0

This is some C#/pseudocode. It definitely won't compile. The implementation is not linear, but I note where you can add a simple optimization to make it more efficient. The algorithm is quite simple, but it seems to be pretty reasonably performant (it's linear with respect to the output. I'm guessing the output grows exponentially... so this algorithm is also exponential. But with a tight constant).

// Note: I've never used BigInteger before. I don't even know what the
// APIs are. Basically you can use strings but hopefully the arbitrary
// precision arithmetic class/struct would be more efficient. You
// mentioned that you intend to add more than just 10 digits. In
// that case you pretty much have to use a string without rolling out
// your own special class. Perhaps C# has an arbitrary precision arithmetic
// which handles arbitrary base as well?
// Note: We assume that possibleDigits is sorted in increasing order. But you 
// could easily sort. Also we assume that it doesn't contain 0. Again easy fix.
public List<BigInteger> GenSequences(int numDigits, List<int> possibleDigits)
{
    // We have special cases to get rid of things like 000050000...
    // hard to explain, but should be obvious if you look at it
    // carefully
    if (numDigits <= 0) 
    { 
        return new List<BigInteger>(); 
    }

    // Starts with all of the valid 1 digit (except 0)
    var sequences = new Queue<BigInteger>(possibleDigits);

    // Special case if numDigits == 1
    if (numDigits == 1) 
    { 
        sequences.Enqueue(new BigInteger(0)); 
        return sequences; 
    }

    // Now the general case. We have all valid sequences of length 1
    // (except 0 because no valid sequence of length greater than 1
    // will start with 0)
    for (int length = 1; length <= numDigits; length++) 
    {
        // Naming is a bit weird. A 'sequence' is just a BigInteger
        var sequence = sequences.Dequeue(); 
        while (sequence.Length == length) 
        {
            // 0 always works
            var temp = sequence * 10; 
            sequences.Enqueue(temp);

            // Now do all of the other possible last digits
            var largestDigitIndex = FindLargestDigitIndex(sequence, possibleDigits); 
            for (int lastDigitIndex = largestDigitIndex; 
                lastDigitIndex < possibleDigits.Length; 
                lastDigitIndex++)
            {
                    temp = sequence * 10 + possibleDigits[lastDigitIndex]; 
                    sequences.Enqueue(temp);
            }

            sequence = sequences.Dequeue(); 
        } 
    } 
}

// TODO: This is the slow part of the algorithm. Instead, keep track of
// the max digit of a given sequence Meaning 5705 => 7. Keep a 1-to-1
// mapping from sequences to largestDigitsInSequences. That's linear
// overhead in memory and reduces time complexity to linear _with respect to the
// output_. So if the output is like `O(k^n)` where `k` is the number of possible
// digits and `n` is the number of digits in the output sequences, then it's
// exponential
private int FindLargestDigitIndex(BigInteger number, 
    List<int> possibleDigits) 
{
    // Just iterate over the digits of number and find the maximum
    // digit. Then return the index of that digit in the
    // possibleDigits list
}

I prove why the algorithm works in the comments above (mostly, at least). It's an inductive argument. For general n > 1 you can take any possible sequence. The first n-1 digits (starting from left) must form a sequence that is also valid (by contradiction). Using induction and then checking the logic in the innermost loop we can see that our desired sequence will be output. This specific implementation you'd also need some proofs around termination and such. For example, the point of the Queue is that we want to process the sequences of length n while we are adding the sequences of length n+1 to the same Queue. The ordering of the Queue allows that innermost while loop to terminate (because we'll go through all sequences of length n before we get to the n+1 sequences).

  • @Narfanator Wut. I don't know anything about template metaprogramming. I skimmed the wiki article... not sure what you mean by "all the way". Are you implying that template metaprogramming is necessary to write really fast code? – rliu Jun 15 '13 at 9:48
  • Nice, thanks for posting this! I am going to have to check it out later today but it looks interesting so far :) – crdzoba Jun 15 '13 at 15:33
  • codegolf.stackexchange.com/a/11887/8369 - This, done in TMP. Oh, the insanity! – Narfanator Jun 18 '13 at 21:41
0

Note: Three solutions are shown; look for the splits.

Describe a valid number, then (1..INFINITE).select{|n| valid(n)}.take(1)

So what's valid? Well, let's take some advantage here:

class Fixnum
 def to_a
   to_s.split('').collect{|d| d.to_i}
 end
end
123.to_a == [1,2,3]

Alright, so, now: Each digit can be a digit already present or zero, or a digit greater than the prior value, and the first digit is always valid.

PS - I use i not i-1 because the loop's index is one less than set's, since I lopped the first element off.

def valid num
  #Ignore zeros:
  set = num.to_a.select{|d| d != 0 }

  #First digit is always valid:
  set[1..-1].each_with_index{ |d, i|

    if d > set[i]
      # puts "Increasing digit"

    elsif set[0..i].include? d
      # puts "Repeat digit"

    else
      # puts "Digit does not pass"
      return false
    end
  }
  return true
end

so then, hurrah for lazy:

  (1..Float::INFINITY).lazy.select{|n| valid n}.take(100).force
  #=> [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 22, 23, 24,
  # 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 55,
  # 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 77, 78, 79, 80, 88, 89, 90, 99, 100, 101, 102, 
  # 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 
  # 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 133, 134, 135, 136]

Now that we have it, let's make it succinct:

def valid2 num
  set = num.to_a.select{|d| d != 0 }
  set[1..-1].each_with_index{ |d, i|
      return false unless (d > set[i]) || (set[0..(i)].include? d)
  }
  return true
end

check:

(1..Float::INFINITY).lazy.select{|n| valid n}.take(100).force - (1..Float::INFINITY).lazy.select{|n| valid2 n}.take(100).force
#=> []

all together now:

def valid num
  set = num.to_s.split('').collect{|d| d.to_i}.select{|d| d != 0 }
  set[1..-1].each_with_index{ |d, i|
      return false unless (d > set[i]) || (set[0..(i)].include? d)
  }
  return true
end

Edit: If you want a particular subset of the set, just change the range. Your original would be:

(500..1000).select{|n| valid n}

Edit2: To generate the range for a given number of digits n:

((Array.new(n-1, 0).unshift(1).join('').to_i)..(Array.new(n, 0).unshift(1).join('').to_i))

Edit3: Interesting alternative method - recursively remove digits as they become valid.

def _rvalid set
  return true if set.size < 2
  return false if set[1] < set[0]
  return _rvalid set.select{|d| d != set[0]}
end

def rvalid num
  return _rvalid num.to_s.split('').collect{|d| d.to_i}.select{|d| d != 0 }
end

(1..Float::INFINITY).lazy.select{|n| rvalid n}.take(100).force

Edit 4: Positive generation method

def _rgen set, target
  return set if set.size == target
  ((set.max..9).to_a + set.uniq).collect{ |d| 
    _rgen((set + [d]), target)
  }
end

def rgen target
  sets = (0..9).collect{|d|
    _rgen [d], target
  }

  # This method has an array problem that I'm not going to figure out right now
  while sets.first.is_a? Array
    sets = sets.flatten
  end
  sets.each_slice(target).to_a.collect{|set| set.join('').to_i}
end
  • ruby syntax is actually surprisingly strange to me. Looks like you are brute forcing every single number though... I hope those string operations are fast? – rliu Jun 15 '13 at 8:18
  • They're not and I think I am. Ruby's not meant for optimized speed and memory, but damn, that is succinct. – Narfanator Jun 15 '13 at 8:20
  • The optimized way is probably to define the set of digits you're still allowed to use and build it that way. Alas, I need to sleep. – Narfanator Jun 15 '13 at 8:21
  • 1
    I'll give you that it's short and sweet. But on the other hand, you could use that pattern for pretty much any problem. Pick an arbitrary problem. Order the possible solutions. Now iterate over the solutions, if it works then output it. I'm writing some pseudocode/C# for a reasonable solution (at first glance it's linear in time and space) even though OP doesn't seem to want it :P. Perhaps you'll enjoy it. – rliu Jun 15 '13 at 8:22
0

This doesn't seem too complex. Write a refinement of a base N increment, with the change that when a digit is incremented from zero it goes straight to the largest of the digits to its left.

Update I misread the spec and my initial take on this didn't quite perform. Depending on the actual dataset the uniq.sort may be too costly, but it is fine when the items in the sequence have only a few digits. The right way would be to maintain a second, sorted copy of the digits, but I'm leaving it like this until I know it's too inefficient.

Note that the values of 0..N here are intended to be used as indices into a sorted list of the actual values each digit can take. A call to map will generate the real elements of the sequence.

This program dumps the same section of the sequence as you have shown yourself (everything beginning with five).

def inc!(seq, limit)

  (seq.length-1).downto(0) do |i|

    if seq[i] == limit
      seq[i] = 0
    else
      valid = seq.first(i).uniq.sort
      valid += ((valid.last || 0).next .. limit).to_a
      seq[i] = valid.find { |v| v > seq[i] }
      break
    end
  end

end

seq = Array.new(3,0)

loop do
  puts seq.join if seq[0] == 5
  inc!(seq, 9)
  break if seq == [0,0,0]
end

output

500
505
506
507
508
509
550
555
556
557
558
559
560
565
566
567
568
569
570
575
577
578
579
580
585
588
589
590
595
599
  • @Denis: Fixed. Thanks – Borodin Jun 16 '13 at 2:42

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