4

I'm very new to Go and I've read (from the FAQ) that Go is both OO and not. I'd like to create data structures using Structs and find myself trying to think of Structs as simple objects. My canonical proof of concept is building a Car. I understand that a car is a real world object so it lends itself to OOP, which might be weird in Go. But I imagine that a User class would be equally convenient so this will be a useful learning exercise and reference for me.

This example compiles but does not function properly. It uses multiple source files so you'll have to manipulate your GOPATH and create a project folder for this.

It should look like this:

$GOPATH/src/car/car.go
$GOPATH/src/car/parts/engine.go

Or another way to look at it:

$ cd /tmp/go/src
$ tree 
.
└── car
    ├── car.go
    └── parts
        └── engine.go

Main asks the car instance to .Start() below. When it comes back to main, car is not started.

/* car/car.go */
package main

import (
    "car/parts"
    "fmt"
)

type Car struct {
    sMake  string
    model  string
    engine parts.Engine
}

func init() { // optional init of package
    // note that we can't use this as a constructor?
}

func main() {
    car := Car{
        sMake: "AMC",
        model: "Gremlin",
    }
    fmt.Printf("I'm going to work now in my %s %s\n", car.sMake, car.model)

    fmt.Println("I guess I should start my car.")
    car.Start()
    fmt.Println("Engine started?", car.engine.IsStarted())
    // fail -- engine started is false  :(
}

func (car Car) Start() {
    fmt.Println("starting engine ...")
    car.engine.Start()
    fmt.Println("you'd think it would be started here ...", car.engine)
    // but it's not
}

Splitting up the source files is convenient. All of this works

/* car/parts/engine.go */
package parts

import (
    "fmt"
)

type Engine struct {
    cylinders int
    started   bool
}

func (engine Engine) Start() {
    fmt.Println("Inside the Start() func, started starts off", engine.started)
    engine.started = true
    fmt.Println("Inside the Start() func, then turns to", engine.started)
    // this is a sanity check
}

func (engine Engine) IsStarted() bool {
    return engine.started
}

Running this outputs:

$ go run car.go
I'm going to work now in my AMC Gremlin
I guess I should start my car.
starting engine ...
Inside the Start() func, started starts off false
Inside the Start() func, then turns to true
you'd think it would be started here ... {0 true}
Engine started? false

Calling functions on the structs makes sense but I wonder if I'm trying to manipulate internal state in the wrong way? Or maybe I don't understand scopes. If someone could help me through this, I'd value it greatly for reference.

Also if someone has a preferred or idiomatic method for initializers. For example, the engine might default to 4 cylinders.

2
5

Methods

Pointers vs. Values

The rule about pointers vs. values for receivers is that value methods can be invoked on pointers and values, but pointer methods can only be invoked on pointers. This is because pointer methods can modify the receiver; invoking them on a copy of the value would cause those modifications to be discarded.

Therefore, for your Engine Start method to work, use a pointer receiver, since the method modifies the receiver. For example,

package main

import (
    "fmt"
)

type Engine struct {
    cylinders int
    started   bool
}

func (engine *Engine) Start() {
    fmt.Println("Inside the Start() func, started starts off", engine.started)
    engine.started = true
    fmt.Println("Inside the Start() func, then turns to", engine.started)
    // this is a sanity check
}

func (engine *Engine) IsStarted() bool {
    return engine.started
}

func main() {
    var engine Engine
    fmt.Println(engine.IsStarted())
    engine.Start()
    fmt.Println(engine.IsStarted())
}

Output:

false
Inside the Start() func, started starts off false
Inside the Start() func, then turns to true
true
2

You're passing the receiver by value. Pass by pointer instead:

func (engine *Engine) Start() {
             ^
}
8
  • 1
    @Matt: Doesn’t “by value” explain it?
    – Ry-
    Jun 15 '13 at 16:23
  • 5
    Maybe not to a Go newbie. It's just an idea to make the answer better. and maybe even for my own benefit. I only started Go a few weeks ago myself, and being able to call methods on a struct but not modify it was throwing me off for a while.
    – Matt
    Jun 15 '13 at 16:24
  • 2
    I'd consider "pass by value" and "pass by pointer" to be basic programming concepts - Go's ability to pass the receiver/this/self by value is the surprising thing.
    – JoeG
    Jun 15 '13 at 16:26
  • 2
    @Matt also see this answer.
    – thwd
    Jun 15 '13 at 23:04
  • 1
    @minitech - As a moderator, I'm surprised by your aren't-you-smart-enough-to-get-this tone. The SO about page says it's for professional and enthusiast programmers. I wouldn't assume all enthusiasts (or even some professionals) understand "by value". A helpful explanation would be nice, though. Jun 19 '13 at 17:51

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