2

I'm new to perl and i would like to know why the arguments are not correcly passed to the subroutine. Also, are the output values correct?

use strict;

sub crc16 {
     use constant POLY => $_[1];
     my $crc = 0;
     for my $c ( unpack 'C*', $_[0] ) {
         $crc ^= $c;
         for my $b ( 0 .. 7 ) {
             my $carry = $crc & 1;
             $crc >>= 1;
             if( $carry ) {
                 $crc ^= POLY;
             }
         }
     }
     return $crc;
}

my $data = "1234";
my $poly = "0x8005";

printf "crc: %04x\n", crc16( $data, $poly );

Thanks!

  • I get 0000 as a result, so I'm going to assume that is wrong. Why do you think the arguments get unpacked incorrectly ? – Hunter McMillen Jun 15 '13 at 16:54
  • because i am also getting 0000... if you replace $_[1] with the string directly, it works. – Laurent Jun 15 '13 at 16:59
  • That's the kind of useful information that should go in your question. – Hunter McMillen Jun 15 '13 at 17:12
2

An use ... statement is always executed at compile time, and is not subject to normal control flow. During compile time, the @_ array does not contain elements, so $_[1] will be undefined. You should be using regular variables:

sub crc16 {
   my ($string, $poly) = @_;
   my $crc = 0;
   for my $c ( unpack 'C*', $string ) {
      $crc ^= $c;
      for ( 0 .. 7 ) {
         my $carry = $crc & 1;
         $crc >>= 1;
         $crc ^= $poly if $carry;
      }
   }
   return $crc;
}

Oh, and you should be specifying the $poly as an integer, not a string: $poly = 0x8005, without the quotes.


As I pointed out in a comment on a similar question of yours, there already is a Perl module that implements CRC algorithms: Digest::CRC. The important parts are coded in C for performance. The provided functions are highly parameterizable. I urge you to find a way to use that module instead of reinventing the wheel.

| improve this answer | |
  • @Laurent Is that string supposed to be hex data, or are the string characters itself to be hashed? You may need to pack "H*" it first – amon Jun 15 '13 at 17:05
  • Yes, i'd like to turn a hex input to a hex (crc-16) output – Laurent Jun 15 '13 at 17:11
  • do i have to pack("H*",$data) before putting it into the function or in the function itself? – Laurent Jun 15 '13 at 17:13
  • There is a difference between the hex string "1A" and the actual number it represents: 26 (case 1). The string itself however can be represented as 0x31 0x41 (case 2). For the interpretation of case 1, you have to translate the data to the binary representation, via pack "H*". I suggest you do this outside the function, to keep your sub as general as possible. – amon Jun 15 '13 at 17:23

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