78

This question already has an answer here:

I'm trying to draw with the mouse over a HTML5 canvas, but the only way that it seems to work well is if the canvas is in the position 0,0 (upper left corner) if I change the canvas position, for some reason it doesn't draw like it should. Here is my code.

 function createImageOnCanvas(imageId){
    document.getElementById("imgCanvas").style.display = "block";
    document.getElementById("images").style.overflowY= "hidden";
    var canvas = document.getElementById("imgCanvas");
    var context = canvas.getContext("2d");
    var img = new Image(300,300);
    img.src = document.getElementById(imageId).src;
    context.drawImage(img, (0),(0));
}

function draw(e){
    var canvas = document.getElementById("imgCanvas");
    var context = canvas.getContext("2d");
    posx = e.clientX;
    posy = e.clientY;
    context.fillStyle = "#000000";
    context.fillRect (posx, posy, 4, 4);
}

The HTML part

 <body>
 <div id="images">
 </div>
 <canvas onmousemove="draw(event)" style="margin:0;padding:0;" id="imgCanvas"
          class="canvasView" width="250" height="250"></canvas> 

I have read there's a way of creating a simple function in JavaScript to get the right position, but I have no idea about how to do it.

marked as duplicate by gman javascript May 19 at 5:49

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

172

The Simple 1:1 Scenario

For situations where the canvas element is 1:1 compared to the bitmap size, you can get the mouse positions by using this snippet:

function getMousePos(canvas, evt) {
    var rect = canvas.getBoundingClientRect();
    return {
      x: evt.clientX - rect.left,
      y: evt.clientY - rect.top
    };
}

Just call it from your event with the event and canvas as arguments. It returns an object with x and y for the mouse positions.

As the mouse position you are getting is relative to the client window you'll have to subtract the position of the canvas element to convert it relative to the element itself.

Example of integration in your code:

//put this outside the event loop..
var canvas = document.getElementById("imgCanvas");
var context = canvas.getContext("2d");

function draw(evt) {
    var pos = getMousePos(canvas, evt);

    context.fillStyle = "#000000";
    context.fillRect (pos.x, pos.y, 4, 4);
}

Fiddle with modifications

Note: borders and padding will affect position if applied directly to the canvas element so these needs to be considered via getComputedStyle() - or apply those styles to a parent div instead.

When Element and Bitmap are of different sizes

When there is the situation of having the element at a different size than the bitmap itself, for example, the element is scaled using CSS or there is pixel-aspect ratio etc. you will have to address this.

Example:

function  getMousePos(canvas, evt) {
  var rect = canvas.getBoundingClientRect(), // abs. size of element
      scaleX = canvas.width / rect.width,    // relationship bitmap vs. element for X
      scaleY = canvas.height / rect.height;  // relationship bitmap vs. element for Y

  return {
    x: (evt.clientX - rect.left) * scaleX,   // scale mouse coordinates after they have
    y: (evt.clientY - rect.top) * scaleY     // been adjusted to be relative to element
  }
}

Fiddle using scale

With transformations applied to context (scale, rotation etc.)

Then there is the more complicated case where you have applied transformation to the context such as rotation, skew/shear, scale, translate etc. To deal with this you can calculate the inverse matrix of the current matrix.

Newer browsers let you read the current matrix via the currentTransform property and Firefox (current alpha) even provide a inverted matrix through the mozCurrentTransformInverted. Firefox however, via mozCurrentTransform, will return an Array and not DOMMatrix as it should. Neither Chrome, when enabled via experimental flags, will return a DOMMatrix but a SVGMatrix.

In most cases however you will have to implement a custom matrix solution of your own (such as my own solution here - free/MIT project) until this get full support.

When you eventually have obtained the matrix regardless of path you take to obtain one, you'll need to invert it and apply it to your mouse coordinates. The coordinates are then passed to the canvas which will use its matrix to convert it to back wherever it is at the moment.

This way the point will be in the correct position relative to the mouse. Also here you need to adjust the coordinates (before applying the inverse matrix to them) to be relative to the element.

An example just showing the matrix steps

function draw(evt) {
    var pos = getMousePos(canvas, evt);        // get adjusted coordinates as above
    var imatrix = matrix.inverse();            // get inverted matrix somehow
    pos = imatrix.applyToPoint(pos.x, pos.y);  // apply to adjusted coordinate

    context.fillStyle = "#000000";
    context.fillRect(pos.x-1, pos.y-1, 2, 2);
}

Example using the solution linked above (replace with native browser solution when more widely supported).

An example of using currentTransform when implemented would be:

    var pos = getMousePos(canvas, e);          // get adjusted coordinates as above
    var matrix = ctx.currentTransform;         // W3C (future)
    var imatrix = matrix.invertSelf();         // invert

    // apply to point:
    var x = pos.x * imatrix.a + pos.y * imatrix.c + imatrix.e;
    var y = pos.x * imatrix.b + pos.y * imatrix.d + imatrix.f;

Update I made a free solution (MIT) to embed all these steps into a single easy-to-use object that can be found here and also takes care of a few other nitty-gritty things most ignore.

  • 1
    Perfect! it worked like a charm! actually, im totally new to html5 and the canvas element, so it took me a while to get a nice understanding of this. Thanks!!! – Solar Confinement Jun 16 '13 at 16:13
  • 1
    getBoundingRectangle() gives more exact co-ordinates than canvas.getOffset(); – poorva Jan 30 '14 at 6:49
  • Um, these coordinates aren't perfect. I get wrong values on the mobile phone. Does someone know a fix or where to look? – Bitterblue Jul 1 '15 at 10:09
  • 1
    I updated answer to address scaling problems. – user1693593 Jun 15 '16 at 20:51
  • 1
    I love you :-) Worked very well – trixo Jun 6 '18 at 12:56
26

You can get the mouse positions by using this snippet:

function getMousePos(canvas, evt) {
    var rect = canvas.getBoundingClientRect();
    return {
        x: (evt.clientX - rect.left) / (rect.right - rect.left) * canvas.width,
        y: (evt.clientY - rect.top) / (rect.bottom - rect.top) * canvas.height
    };
}

This code takes into account both changing coordinates to canvas space (evt.clientX - rect.left) and scaling when canvas logical size differs from its style size (/ (rect.right - rect.left) * canvas.width see: Canvas width and height in HTML5).

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/sierawski/4xezb7nL/

Source: jerryj comment on http://www.html5canvastutorials.com/advanced/html5-canvas-mouse-coordinates/

  • I had to use this version, since my canvas size changed while scaling and/or resizing the window. I had already solved the problem by scaling with the computed width & height using getComputedStyle(), but this solution is more elegant. I would recommend this answer to those who want a more general solution. – osolmaz Dec 21 '16 at 8:57
  • 1
    It assumes there's no border on the canvas (if there is it's a PITA so best not to put borders on canvases) – gman Apr 11 '17 at 14:22
  • @Rafal S : I use var bRect = theCanvas.getBoundingClientRect(); mouseX = (evt.clientX - bRect.left)*(theCanvas.width/bRect.width); mouseY = (evt.clientY - bRect.top)*(theCanvas.height/bRect.height); In browser chrome, IE in PC , safari in iOS is ok, but in chrome web android is wrong mouseY so much. Can I fix it by your code? – Adam Aug 10 '17 at 1:54
  • Thanks I have been looking for this solution for days. – Sagi Nov 20 '18 at 6:46
6

You need to get the mouse position relative to the canvas

To do that you need to know the X/Y position of the canvas on the page.

This is called the canvas’s “offset”, and here’s how to get the offset. (I’m using jQuery in order to simplify cross-browser compatibility, but if you want to use raw javascript a quick Google will get that too).

    var canvasOffset=$("#canvas").offset();
    var offsetX=canvasOffset.left;
    var offsetY=canvasOffset.top;

Then in your mouse handler, you can get the mouse X/Y like this:

  function handleMouseDown(e){
      mouseX=parseInt(e.clientX-offsetX);
      mouseY=parseInt(e.clientY-offsetY);
}

Here is an illustrating code and fiddle that shows how to successfully track mouse events on the canvas:

http://jsfiddle.net/m1erickson/WB7Zu/

<!doctype html>
<html>
<head>
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" media="all" href="css/reset.css" /> <!-- reset css -->
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery.min.js"></script>

<style>
    body{ background-color: ivory; }
    canvas{border:1px solid red;}
</style>

<script>
$(function(){

    var canvas=document.getElementById("canvas");
    var ctx=canvas.getContext("2d");

    var canvasOffset=$("#canvas").offset();
    var offsetX=canvasOffset.left;
    var offsetY=canvasOffset.top;

    function handleMouseDown(e){
      mouseX=parseInt(e.clientX-offsetX);
      mouseY=parseInt(e.clientY-offsetY);
      $("#downlog").html("Down: "+ mouseX + " / " + mouseY);

      // Put your mousedown stuff here

    }

    function handleMouseUp(e){
      mouseX=parseInt(e.clientX-offsetX);
      mouseY=parseInt(e.clientY-offsetY);
      $("#uplog").html("Up: "+ mouseX + " / " + mouseY);

      // Put your mouseup stuff here
    }

    function handleMouseOut(e){
      mouseX=parseInt(e.clientX-offsetX);
      mouseY=parseInt(e.clientY-offsetY);
      $("#outlog").html("Out: "+ mouseX + " / " + mouseY);

      // Put your mouseOut stuff here
    }

    function handleMouseMove(e){
      mouseX=parseInt(e.clientX-offsetX);
      mouseY=parseInt(e.clientY-offsetY);
      $("#movelog").html("Move: "+ mouseX + " / " + mouseY);

      // Put your mousemove stuff here

    }

    $("#canvas").mousedown(function(e){handleMouseDown(e);});
    $("#canvas").mousemove(function(e){handleMouseMove(e);});
    $("#canvas").mouseup(function(e){handleMouseUp(e);});
    $("#canvas").mouseout(function(e){handleMouseOut(e);});

}); // end $(function(){});
</script>

</head>

<body>
    <p>Move, press and release the mouse</p>
    <p id="downlog">Down</p>
    <p id="movelog">Move</p>
    <p id="uplog">Up</p>
    <p id="outlog">Out</p>
    <canvas id="canvas" width=300 height=300></canvas>

</body>
</html>
  • Instead of $("#canvas").offset(); and then taking left and top i was using $("#canvas").offsetLeft , so the relative position was not right ! – poorva Jan 28 '14 at 10:57
3

Refer this question: The mouseEvent.offsetX I am getting is much larger than actual canvas size .I have given a function there which will exactly suit in your situation

3

The easiest way to compute the correct mouse click or mouse move position on a canvas event is to use this little equation:

canvas.addEventListener('click', event =>
{
    let bound = canvas.getBoundingClientRect();

    let x = event.clientX - bound.left - canvas.clientLeft;
    let y = event.clientY - bound.top - canvas.clientTop;

    context.fillRect(x, y, 16, 16);
});

If the canvas has padding-left or padding-top, subtract x and y via:

x -= parseFloat(style['padding-left'].replace('px'));
y -= parseFloat(style['padding-top'].replace('px'));

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