0

In the following program, suppose a is stored at address 1000 and an int takes up 4bytes of storage. Now, c will point to the base address ie, 1000 and incrementing it by 3 will make it point to address 1003. Now, printing the character pointed to by c must give me the character corresponding to ascii 65. But it prints nothing!

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

int main(){
    int a = 65;
    char *c = &a;
    printf("%c\n", *(c+3));
}

What is wrong in my reasoning?

7

You didn't take endianness into account. On a little-endian system, the 'a' (or if the encoding isn't ASCII compatible, whatever 65 is) will be in the first byte, and the other bytes are 0. Passing a 0 byte to printf("%c\n",_); prints out nothing but the newline.

3

printing the character pointed to by c must give me the character corresponding to ascii 65

It should and if your machine is little-endian, it will, indeed. However, you're printing the 4th byte of your int using *(c + 3), that's still 0. Perhaps you meant *c instead?


The best would be not aliasing stuff through pointers, however. Integers have the nice property that they can be operated on by bitwise operators.

uint32_t i = 0x12345678;
uint8_t b0 = (i >>  0) & 0xff;
uint8_t b1 = (i >>  8) & 0xff;
uint8_t b2 = (i >> 16) & 0xff;
uint8_t b3 = (i >> 24) & 0xff;

This will give you access to the bytes correctly regardless to the endianness of sour architecture.

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