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consider my file

Test.mxml

output file

Test.swf

Each time i make some changes in Test.mxml corresoping swf file is generated.

But this is causing some problem in proxy server.

When i change the version of swf file generated its working fine(im able to see new changes as proxy server will load the new renamed file)(i tried versioning)

I cant see my changed swf file, its giving me cached swf file because of which the changes are not reflected.

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2 Answers 2

A few approaches to handle this:

  1. It may be possible to tell your proxy not to cache this file if you have any control over it.
  2. Sometimes people use the "Random number" technique to prevent files from being cached. that is, in your HTML page that wraps your SWF; add a random number to the SWF location. Conceptually like this myswf.swf?someRandomNumber .
  3. Every time you deploy a new build you could change the filename.
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You can also try having your browser send the no-cache headers, which causes the (WebSphere Edge) proxy server to dump its cached copy too. In Firefox, at least, Shift-Reload does this. I think that's true in IE and maybe Chrome too.

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Do you mean that the server should set the no-cache header? It doesn't seam practical to have to modify every client to not cache the file. –  JeffryHouser Jun 17 '13 at 14:48
    
No. Just one time (each time you change the file) send a client request that has the request header set to tell any proxies not to give you a cached copy. Once you do that, you'll force the proxy server to get a fresh copy this time. Long term, the person who asked this probably want a different solution like the ones you suggested, I'm just saying that this is a very easy approach if he/she is just wanting to quickly see changes during testing right now. –  dbreaux Jun 17 '13 at 17:34
    
Or, I suppose, even if changes to the file are very infrequent and can be handled manually when they occur. Just manually forcing the proxy to know there is a new copy to begin serving. Rather than using more complicated schemes or never caching. –  dbreaux Jun 17 '13 at 17:35

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