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Do you know a fast and simple way to encode a Javascript Object into a string that I can pass via a GET Request?

No jQuery, no other frameworks - just plain Javascript :)

5
  • Why can't JQuery be a solution if there is an appropriate one for your solution? – eaglei22 Mar 30 '17 at 22:38
  • @eaglei22 because at the time I was working on a project for an IPTV set top box device and no external libraries were allowed. ;-) – napolux Mar 31 '17 at 8:22
  • 1
    Thanks for the response. I see this specification from time to time and always wondered a scenario why. Well, now I got one, thanks! :) – eaglei22 Mar 31 '17 at 13:48
  • 10
    @eaglei22 Because sometimes you don't want to load a large library to get one element by id. – Aaron Harun Jun 26 '17 at 20:46
  • most browsers support URLSearchParams now... – mb21 Mar 12 '18 at 17:11

41 Answers 41

1
2
0

const buildSortedQuery = (args) => {
    return Object.keys(args)
        .sort()
        .map(key => {
            return window.encodeURIComponent(key)
                + '='
                + window.encodeURIComponent(args[key]);
        })
        .join('&');
};

console.log(buildSortedQuery({
  foo: "hi there",
  bar: "100%"
}));

//bar=100%25&foo=hi%20there

0
const querystring=  {};

querystring.stringify = function (obj, sep = '&', eq = '=') {
  const escape = encodeURIComponent;
  const qs = [];
  let key = null;

  for (key in obj) if (obj.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
    qs.push(escape(key) + eq + escape(String(obj[key])));
  }
  return qs.join(sep);
};

Example:

const a  = querystring.stringify({a: 'all of them', b: true});
console.log(a);  // Output: a=all%20of%20them&b=true
0

here is a simple implementation that gets an object and converts it to query params string

export function objectToQueryParams(queryParams: object): string {
  return queryParams ?
    Object.entries(queryParams).reduce((acc, [key, val], index) => {
      const sign = index === 0 ? '?' : '&';
      acc += `${sign}${encodeURIComponent(key)}=${encodeURIComponent(val)}`;
      return acc;
    }, '')
    : '';
}
1
  • 1
    You need encodeURIComponent around key and val like every other response here – sbk Jan 24 '20 at 13:03
0

My implementation of encoding object as query string, using reduce:

export const encodeAsQueryString = (params) => (
  Object.keys(params).reduce((acc, key)=>(
    params.hasOwnProperty(key) ? (
      [...acc, encodeURIComponent(key) + '=' + encodeURIComponent(params[key])]
    ) : acc
  ), []).join('&')
);
0

If you want to pass an entire object as a single param, e.g ?filter={param1: "val1", param2: "val2"}

const serializeObject = (obj) => {
  let objStr = JSON.stringify(obj);

  objStr = objStr.replace(/\{/g, encodeURIComponent("{"));
  objStr = objStr.replace(/}/g, encodeURIComponent("}"));
  objStr = objStr.replace(/:/g, encodeURIComponent(":"));

  return objStr;
};

let res = serializeObject({param1: "val1", param2: "val2"});
console.log("serializeObject:", res); //%7B"param1"%3A"val1","param2"%3A"val2"%7D
console.log("serializeObject-decoded:", decodeURIComponent(res)); //{"param1":"val1","param2":"val2"}
0

While there are limits to query-string lengths that should be considered (for sending JSON data in HTTP/s GET calls versus using POST) ...

JSON.stringify(yourJSON) will create a String from your JSON object.

Then just hex-encode it (link below).

That will work ALWAYS versus various possible problems with base64 type URL encoding, UTF-8 characters, nested JSON objects and such.

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/JSON/stringify

Encode String to HEX

0

To do it in better way.

It can handle recursive objects or arrays in the STANDARD query form like a=val&b[0]=val&b[1]=val&c=val&d[some key]=val, here's the final function.

Logic, Functionality

const objectToQueryString = (initialObj) => {
  const reducer = (obj, parentPrefix = null) => (prev, key) => {
    const val = obj[key];
    key = encodeURIComponent(key);
    const prefix = parentPrefix ? `${parentPrefix}[${key}]` : key;

    if (val == null || typeof val === 'function') {
      prev.push(`${prefix}=`);
      return prev;
    }

    if (['number', 'boolean', 'string'].includes(typeof val)) {
      prev.push(`${prefix}=${encodeURIComponent(val)}`);
      return prev;
    }

    prev.push(Object.keys(val).reduce(reducer(val, prefix), []).join('&'));
    return prev;
  };

  return Object.keys(initialObj).reduce(reducer(initialObj), []).join('&');
};

Example

const testCase1 = {
  name: 'Full Name',
  age: 30
}

const testCase2 = {
  name: 'Full Name',
  age: 30,
  children: [
    {name: 'Child foo'},
    {name: 'Foo again'}
  ],
  wife: {
    name: 'Very Difficult to say here'
  }
}

console.log(objectToQueryString(testCase1));
console.log(objectToQueryString(testCase2));

Live Test

Expand the snippet below to verify the result in your browser -

const objectToQueryString = (initialObj) => {
  const reducer = (obj, parentPrefix = null) => (prev, key) => {
    const val = obj[key];
    key = encodeURIComponent(key);
    const prefix = parentPrefix ? `${parentPrefix}[${key}]` : key;

    if (val == null || typeof val === 'function') {
      prev.push(`${prefix}=`);
      return prev;
    }

    if (['number', 'boolean', 'string'].includes(typeof val)) {
      prev.push(`${prefix}=${encodeURIComponent(val)}`);
      return prev;
    }

    prev.push(Object.keys(val).reduce(reducer(val, prefix), []).join('&'));
    return prev;
  };

  return Object.keys(initialObj).reduce(reducer(initialObj), []).join('&');
};

const testCase1 = {
  name: 'Full Name',
  age: 30
}

const testCase2 = {
  name: 'Full Name',
  age: 30,
  children: [
    {name: 'Child foo'},
    {name: 'Foo again'}
  ],
  wife: {
    name: 'Very Difficult to say here'
  }
}

console.log(objectToQueryString(testCase1));
console.log(objectToQueryString(testCase2));

Things to consider.

  • It skips values for functions, null, undefined
  • It skips keys and values for empty objects and arrays.
  • It doesn't handle Number or String Objects made with new Number(1) or new String('my string') because NO ONE should ever do that
-1

You can also achieve this by using simple JavaScript.

const stringData = '?name=Nikhil&surname=Mahirrao&age=30';
    
const newData= {};
stringData.replace('?', '').split('&').map((value) => {
  const temp = value.split('=');
  newData[temp[0]] = temp[1];
});

console.log('stringData: '+stringData);
console.log('newData: ');
console.log(newData);

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  • 1
    This is a nice exercise, but this is the other way around. Not an answer to the question. – Christiaan Westerbeek Sep 25 '18 at 10:12
-1
const serialize = obj => Object.keys(obj).reduce((a, b) =>
    a.push(encodeURIComponent(b) + "=" + encodeURIComponent(obj[b])) && a,
    []).join("&");

Call:

console.log(serialize({a:1,b:2}));
// output: 'a=1&b=2

'

1
  • From review queue: May I request you to please add some context around your source-code. Code-only answers are difficult to understand. It will help the asker and future readers both if you can add more information in your post. – RBT May 30 '19 at 9:54
-1

Here is a simple answer that deals with strings and arrays at the same time during conversion.

jsonToQueryString: function (data) {
        return Object.keys(data).map((key) => {
            if (Array.isArray(data[key])) {
                return (`${encodeURIComponent(key)}=${data[key].map((item) => encodeURIComponent(item)).join('%2C')}`);
            }
            return(`${encodeURIComponent(key)}=${encodeURIComponent(data[key])}`);
        }).join('&');
    }
-1

With Ramda:

    R.pipe(R.toPairs, R.map(R.join('=')), R.join('&'))({a: 'b', b: 'a'})
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