3

I'm trying to do the following:

#!/bin/sh
ssh user@server "echo \"Test \n for newline\""

This displays:

test \n for newline

How do I get the shell to interpret \n as an actual newline?

4

Try using the -e option, e.g., echo -e "Test \n for newline".

If your echo doesn't have a -e option, then I'd use printf. It's widely available and it does not have nearly as many variations in it's implementations.

  • this doesn't work. Man page says -n Do not print the trailing newline character. That's the only option I have. The description in the beginning does say, "The echo utility writes any specified operands, separated by single ( ')` characters and followed by a newline (\n')` character, to the standard output." – hax0r_n_code Jun 17 '13 at 13:45
  • If your echo doesn't have a -e option, then I'd use printf. It's widely available and it does not have nearly as many variations in it's implementations. – cmt Jun 17 '13 at 13:49
  • thanks a lot! I didn't think of trying that. – hax0r_n_code Jun 17 '13 at 13:50
2

For greater portability, use printf instead of echo.

#!/bin/sh
ssh user@server 'printf "Test \n for newline"'

According to the POSIX standard, echo should process \n as a newline character. The bash built-in echo does not, unless you supply the -e option.

1

Just use one of

#!/bin/sh
ssh user@server "echo -e \"Test \n for newline\""

or

#!/bin/sh
ssh user@server 'echo  -e "Test \n for newline"'

or

#!/bin/sh
ssh user@server "echo  -e 'Test \n for newline'"

or even

#!/bin/sh
ssh user@server "echo 'Test 
 for newline'"

All of those will display

Test 
 for newline

(note the trailing space after the first line and the leading space before the second one - I just copied your code)

0

Before exectuning ssh command update the IFS environment variable with new line character.

IFS='                                  
'

Store the ssh command output to a varaible

CMD_OUTPUT=$(ssh userName@127.0.0.1 'cat /proc/meminfo')

iterate the output per line

for s in $CMD_OUTPUT; do echo "$s"; done

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.