3

This question already has an answer here:

I have a column (full_location_id) in a table that contains a string is delimited by '-' which I need to split up into 4 columns in a view (Test_SplitColumn). Not every record in full_location_id contains the same length of ids. Some may have ids such as A1-BF-35-B1 while others may simply have AR-B3. I'm not sure about the best way of doing so. I am able to retrieve the first column but so far the not the others.

CREATE VIEW [dbo].[Test_SplitColumn]
AS
select p.name, location.aisle_id, location.full_location_id, SUBSTRING(location.full_location_id, 0,charindex('-', location.full_location_id )) as Aisle,
SUBSTRING(location.full_location_id, charindex('-', location.full_location_id ) + 1, charindex('-', location.full_location_id, LEN(SUBSTRING(location.full_location_id, 0,charindex('-', location.full_location_id ))) )) as ShelvingUnit
from location 
inner join product p on p.id = location.product_id
GO

Any help or guidance would be appreciated.

marked as duplicate by Conrad Frix, Cheran Shunmugavel, Achrome, Pere Villega, Robert Jun 18 '13 at 10:02

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • This would be much better solved the other way round. Have 4 columns in your table and a view/computed column to show the 4 combined as a delimited string. – GarethD Jun 17 '13 at 15:26
  • I was able to resolve my issue using the function found here: itdeveloperzone.com/2012/03/… along with some case logic in the SQL code which created my view. – dspencer Jun 18 '13 at 18:29
13

Here is a quick, easy way:

DECLARE @T TABLE(full_location_id varchar(100));

INSERT INTO @T 
VALUES  ('A1-BF-35-B1'),
        ('AR-B3');

WITH CTE AS
(
    SELECT  full_location_id,
            LEN(full_location_id)-LEN(REPLACE(full_location_id,'-','')) N
    FROM @T
)
SELECT  full_location_id,
        PARSENAME(REPLACE(full_location_id,'-','.'),N+1),
        PARSENAME(REPLACE(full_location_id,'-','.'),N),
        PARSENAME(REPLACE(full_location_id,'-','.'),N-1),
        PARSENAME(REPLACE(full_location_id,'-','.'),N-2)
FROM CTE

Results:

╔══════════════════╦══════╦══════╦══════╦══════╗
║ full_location_id ║ Col1 ║ Col2 ║ Col3 ║ Col4 ║
╠══════════════════╬══════╬══════╬══════╬══════╣
║ A1-BF-35-B1      ║ A1   ║ BF   ║ 35   ║ B1   ║
║ AR-B3            ║ AR   ║ B3   ║ NULL ║ NULL ║
╚══════════════════╩══════╩══════╩══════╩══════╝

And here is an sqlfiddle with a demo.

  • Nice -- thought about abusing PARSENAME also but that always makes me nervous! – Transact Charlie Jun 17 '13 at 15:24
  • But PARSENAME can't handle more than 4 values. – Tab Alleman Apr 12 '16 at 16:02
  • @TabAlleman Yes, but the requirement is: I need to split up into 4 columns in a view – Lamak Apr 12 '16 at 16:07
  • Well true, I was trying to find a duplicate to flag another question with, but the 4-column limit precludes this one. I used the question that this one is flagged with instead. – Tab Alleman Apr 12 '16 at 16:08
3

This is a failure of your model. Instead of storing the locations as a delimited string it's probably a good idea to make a 1-n table to store the locations in instead. And in fact the correct 'answer' to your question is probably "redesign this part of the database!"

However, to do what you want you can do stuff like this:

USE tempdb
GO

/* udfSplit (A Fast String Splitter) **************************************************************
 *
 * Uses a number table to *very* quickly split the text (@text). Splits on the delimiter (@d)
 * Returns Table of ( [RowID], [SplitText] ). Inlineable for CROSS APPLY etc.
 *
 * Charlie
 *
 *************************************************************************************************/
CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[udfSplit] (@text NVARCHAR(4000), @d NVARCHAR(50))
RETURNS TABLE AS RETURN (
WITH numbers(n) AS (
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY a.[n])
  FROM
             ( VALUES (0), (1), (2), (3), (4), (5), (6), (7), (8), (9) ) AS  a ([n])
  CROSS JOIN ( VALUES (0), (1), (2), (3), (4), (5), (6), (7), (8), (9) ) AS  b ([n])
  CROSS JOIN ( VALUES (0), (1), (2), (3), (4), (5), (6), (7), (8), (9) ) AS  c ([n])
  CROSS JOIN ( VALUES (0), (1), (2), (3), (4)) AS  d ([n])
  )
SELECT
      [RowID] = ROW_NUMBER() OVER ( ORDER BY [n] ASC )
    , [SplitText] = SUBSTRING(
        @d + @text + @d
        , [n] + LEN(@d)
        , CHARINDEX(@d, @d + @text + @d, [n] + LEN(@d)) - [n] - LEN(@d)
        )
FROM numbers AS n
WHERE [n] <= LEN(@d + @text + @d) - LEN(@d)
  AND SUBSTRING(@d + @text + @d, [n], LEN(@d)) = @d
)
GO

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#sample') IS NOT NULL DROP TABLE #sample
GO

CREATE TABLE #sample (
      name VARCHAR(255)
    , locations VARCHAR(MAX)
    )

INSERT #sample (name, locations)    
VALUES ('a', 'ab-cd')
     , ('b', 'ab-cd-ef')
     , ('c', 'gh')
     , ('d', NULL)

; WITH SPLIT AS (
    SELECT [name], l.*
    FROM #sample AS s
    OUTER APPLY dbo.[udfSplit](s.locations,'-') AS l
    )
SELECT
      s.name
    , MAX(CASE WHEN s.rowId = 1 THEN s.SplitText ELSE '' END) AS a
    , MAX(CASE WHEN s.rowId = 2 THEN s.SplitText ELSE '' END) AS b
    , MAX(CASE WHEN s.rowId = 3 THEN s.SplitText ELSE '' END) AS c
    , MAX(CASE WHEN s.rowId = 4 THEN s.SplitText ELSE '' END) AS d
FROM
    SPLIT AS s
GROUP BY
    s.name

This probably looks super complicated. The function udfSplit is a very fast string splitter -- it turns your delimited string into a table returning postion (1-4) and the split string. Unless you really want to get into it just don't worry how it works. If you do want to learn about splitting strings in the db (and in general why that's a bad plan) -- then read here:

http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/Tally+Table/72993/

The rest of the code makes up a sample table and then does a select on it to get the output you wanted:

(4 row(s) affected)
name                 a     b     c     d
-------------------- ----- ----- ----- -----
a                    ab    cd          
b                    ab    cd    ef    
c                    gh                
d                                      

The MAX(CASE....) Expressions are a pivoting trick back in sql server 2000 land. I never got the hang of the PIVOT operator.

SQL Fiddle: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!3/80f74/1

0

Here is a more generalized way to do it. This assumes you knows the max number of columns you would have.

CREATE TABLE #tmp (
    full_location_id varchar(255) );

INSERT INTO dbo.#tmp VALUES ( 'A1-BF-35-B1' );
INSERT INTO dbo.#tmp VALUES ( 'AR-B3' );
INSERT INTO dbo.#tmp VALUES ( 'A1-BF-35' );
INSERT INTO dbo.#tmp VALUES ( 'A1' );


with tmp( full_location_id, c, position, single ) as (
select #tmp.full_location_id
     , STUFF( #tmp.full_location_id, 1, CHARINDEX('-', #tmp.full_location_id + ' -'), '') AS c
     , 1 AS position
     , convert(nvarchar(max),left(#tmp.full_location_id, CHARINDEX('-', #tmp.full_location_id + ' -') -1)) AS single
  from #tmp
 union all
select full_location_id
     , STUFF(c, 1, CHARINDEX('-', c + ' -'), '')
     , position + 1
     , convert(nvarchar(max),left(c, CHARINDEX('-', c + ' -') -1))
  from tmp
 where c > ''
)

SELECT pvt.full_location_id
     , [1]
     , [2]
     , [3]
     , [4]
 FROM 
( SELECT full_location_id
       , single
       , position
    FROM tmp ) AS src
PIVOT
(
    MAX( single )
    FOR position IN ( [1], [2], [3], [4] )

) AS pvt;

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