123

I am using python to work out how many children would be born in 5 years if a child was born every 7 seconds. The problem is on my last line. How do I get a variable to work when I'm printing text either side of it?

Here is my code:

currentPop = 312032486
oneYear = 365
hours = 24
minutes = 60
seconds = 60

# seconds in a single day
secondsInDay = hours * minutes * seconds

# seconds in a year
secondsInYear = secondsInDay * oneYear

fiveYears = secondsInYear * 5

#Seconds in 5 years
print fiveYears

# fiveYears in seconds, divided by 7 seconds
births = fiveYears // 7

print "If there was a birth every 7 seconds, there would be: " births "births"

14 Answers 14

186

Use , to separate strings and variables while printing:

print "If there was a birth every 7 seconds, there would be: ",births,"births"

, in print statement separtes the items by a single space:

>>> print "foo","bar","spam"
foo bar spam

or better use string formatting:

print "If there was a birth every 7 seconds, there would be: {} births".format(births)

String formatting is much more powerful and allows you to do some other things as well, like : padding, fill, alignment,width, set precision etc

>>> print "{:d} {:03d} {:>20f}".format(1,2,1.1)
1 002             1.100000
  ^^^
  0's padded to 2

Demo:

>>> births = 4
>>> print "If there was a birth every 7 seconds, there would be: ",births,"births"
If there was a birth every 7 seconds, there would be:  4 births

#formatting
>>> print "If there was a birth every 7 seconds, there would be: {} births".format(births)
If there was a birth every 7 seconds, there would be: 4 births
45

two more

The First one

 >>>births = str(5)
 >>>print "there are " + births + " births."
 there are 5 births.

When adding strings, they concatenate.

The Second One

Also the format (Python 2.6 and newer) method of strings is probably the standard way:

>>> births = str(5)
>>>
>>> print "there are {} births.".format(births)
there are 5 births.

This format method can be used with lists as well

>>> format_list = ['five','three']
>>> print "there are {} births and {} deaths".format(*format_list) #unpack the list
there are five births and three deaths

or dictionaries

>>> format_dictionary = {'births': 'five', 'deaths': 'three'}
>>> print "there are {births} births, and {deaths} deaths".format(**format_dictionary) #yup, unpack the dictionary
there are five births, and three deaths
21

If you want to work with python 3, it's very simple:

print("If there was a birth every 7 second, there would be %d births." % (births))
12

You can either use a formatstring:

print "There are %d births" % (births,)

or in this simple case:

print "There are ", births, "births"
  • 1
    be careful if using that second way though, because that is a tuple, not a string. – TehTris Apr 11 '14 at 23:20
12

Python is a very versatile language. You may print variables by different methods. I have listed below 4 methods. You may use them according to your convenience.

Example:

a=1
b='ball'

Method 1:

print('I have %d %s' %(a,b))

Method 2:

print('I have',a,b)

Method 3:

print('I have {} {}'.format(a,b))

Method 4:

print('I have ' + str(a) +' ' +b)

Output would be:

I have 1 ball
7

As of python 3.6 you can use Literal String Interpolation.

births = 5.25487
>>> print(f'If there was a birth every 7 seconds, there would be: {births:.2f} births')
If there was a birth every 7 seconds, there would be: 5.25 births
  • 1
    My favorite for complex strings. – Jason LeMonier Jul 25 '18 at 22:29
3

You would first make a variable: for example: D = 1. Then Do This but replace the string with whatever you want:

D = 1
print("Here is a number!:",D)
3

On a current python version you have to use parenthesis, like so :

print ("If there was a birth every 7 seconds", X)
2

You can either use the f-string or .format() methods

Using f-string

print(f'If there was a birth every 7 seconds, there would be: {births} births')

Using .formt()

print("If there was a birth every 7 seconds, there would be: {births} births".format(births=births))
1

You can use string formatting to do this:

print "If there was a birth every 7 seconds, there would be: %d births" % births

or you can give print multiple arguments, and it will automatically separate them by a space:

print "If there was a birth every 7 seconds, there would be:", births, "births"
  • thank you for the answer Amber. Can you explain what the 'd' does after the % symbol? thanks – Bob Uni Jun 17 '13 at 18:03
  • 2
    %d means "format value as an integer". Similarly, %s would be "format value as a string", and %f is "format value as a floating point number". These and more are documented in the portion of the Python manual I linked to in my answer. – Amber Jun 17 '13 at 18:04
  • Thank you very much. – Bob Uni Jun 17 '13 at 18:05
1

I copied and pasted your script into a .py file. I ran it as-is with Python 2.7.10 and received the same syntax error. I also tried the script in Python 3.5 and received the following output:

File "print_strings_on_same_line.py", line 16
print fiveYears
              ^
SyntaxError: Missing parentheses in call to 'print'

Then, I modified the last line where it prints the number of births as follows:

currentPop = 312032486
oneYear = 365
hours = 24
minutes = 60
seconds = 60

# seconds in a single day
secondsInDay = hours * minutes * seconds

# seconds in a year
secondsInYear = secondsInDay * oneYear

fiveYears = secondsInYear * 5

#Seconds in 5 years
print fiveYears

# fiveYears in seconds, divided by 7 seconds
births = fiveYears // 7

print "If there was a birth every 7 seconds, there would be: " + str(births) + " births"

The output was (Python 2.7.10):

157680000
If there was a birth every 7 seconds, there would be: 22525714 births

I hope this helps.

1

use String formatting

print("If there was a birth every 7 seconds, there would be: {} births".format(births))
 # Will replace "{}" with births

if you doing a toy project use:

print('If there was a birth every 7 seconds, there would be:' births'births) 

or

print('If there was a birth every 7 seconds, there would be: %d births' %(births))
# Will replace %d with births
1

If you are using python 3.6 or latest, f-string is the best and easy one

print(f"{your_varaible_name}")
0

Slightly different: Using Python 3 and print several variables in the same line:

print("~~Create new DB:",argv[5],"; with user:",argv[3],"; and Password:",argv[4]," ~~")

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