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I have a template like this:

template<typename T>
struct foo {
  foo(T t) {
    //code
  }
  virtual double computation() = 0;
  //other members
};

I want users to provide their own subclasses with a custom T and computation() like this:

struct my_foo : public foo<std::string> {
  double computation() override { return 9.99; }
};

The problem is that this doesn't work:

my_foo("hello");

I would have to ask users to create a new constructor for every subclass, even if all it does is call the superclass constructor. This looks silly.

Can you suggest alternative "design patterns" that may be more suitable for me?

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  • Ask your user to inherit the constructor: using foo::foo;
    – Kerrek SB
    Jun 17, 2013 at 23:13

2 Answers 2

1

I believe it has no direct relationship with template.

It is simply due to: in C++, constructor is not inherited.

Try this example and you will see it does not work:

class Parent {
public:
    Parent(int i) {
        cout << "i " << i << endl;
    };
};

class Child : public Parent {
};

int main(int argc, char** args) {
    Child child(1);
    return 0;
}

because by default, constructor of Child will call Parent's no-arg ctor. However no-arg ctor is not available in Parent.

Change Child to provide proper ctor will solve the problem:

class Child : public Parent {
public:
    Child(int i):Parent(i) {
    }
};

In this example, I created a ctor for Child which takes 1 param. This Child ctor will invoke Parent's Parent(int) ctor.

In your question, you said it is silly to ask Child classes to create the ctor: It is not silly at all! You will never know how the child wants its class to be instantiated. Certain child class may only be reasonable to be constructed with 2 parameters for ctor base on its semantic meaning.

If you really really want it to be done magically, one simplest way you can do is to create macros to "generate" the class declaration and corresponding ctor for the child class. However it is seldom meaningful to do so.

1

As far as I can see from your example, you want the user to specify a type and a computation function. Since you did not provide a virtual destructor, I assume that you don not want to use the resulting template instantiations polymorphically, e.g. you don't want to store/exchange different foo<string> implementations in the same place. In other words, the only purpose of the pure virtual function seems to make the implementation of computation() by the client mandatory.

You further want the constructor of your template be usable without the client having to reimplement or explicitly import it to his class. That can be achieved only if my_foo is an instance of foo and not a derived class.

In that case, you could use policy based design:

template<typename T, typename ComputationPolicy>
struct foo : ComputationPolicy {
  foo(T t) {
    //code
  }

  void bar() {
    double d = ComputationPolicy::computation(); //just use it!
  }

  //...
};

Users of the template now have to define a type that has a function computation(), returning a value convertible to double, otherwise the template can't be instantiated:

struct myComp  {
  double computation() { return 9.99; }
};

typedef foo<std::string, myComp> my_foo;

my_foo("hello");

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