0

I am trying to access a 2D array of chars. I have a pointer on right address but somehow dreferencing is not working.

    char ary[5][8];
char temp[8];
int i;

char **a_ptr = &ary;

    for(i=0; i<5; i++){
        sprintf(temp, "0x10%d" , i);
        strcpy(ary[i] , temp);
        printf("~~~%s@0x%x == 0x%x" , ary[i] , &ary[i] , (a_ptr + i));

    }

    for(i=0; i<5; i++){//This wont work. 
        printf("~~~%s@0x%x" , *(a_ptr + i) ,  (a_ptr + i));

    }

Below is the output of this fucniton before it breaks to derefence the pointer.

Output Format : Value@Address

0x100@0x5fbff408 == 0x5fbff408
0x101@0x5fbff410 == 0x5fbff410
0x102@0x5fbff418 == 0x5fbff418
0x103@0x5fbff420 == 0x5fbff420
0x104@0x5fbff428 == 0x5fbff428

As we can see in above output that array values are filled correctly and a_ptr is pointing to correct addresses (&ary[i] == (a_ptr + i)).

But when the pointer is deference then it breaks there. Even using the [] operators does the same.

*(a_ptr + i); //Breaks
a_ptr[i]; //Breaks as well

However, (a_ptr + i) points to the right address.

Thanks,

4

char **a_ptr = &ary; - this makes no sense. char** a_ptr is a pointer to a pointer. What you need is a pointer to an array. The following will do:

char (*a_ptr)[8] = ary; // also don't take the address of the array

If you're trying to print the pointer address, printf has a format for this %p. Replace your 0x%xs with %p.

I've edited your code as follows and my compiler no longer issues warnings:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{
    char ary[5][8];
    char temp[8];
    int i;

    char (*a_ptr)[8] = ary;

    for(i=0; i<5; i++)
    {
        sprintf(temp, "0x10%d" , i);
        strcpy(ary[i] , temp);
        printf("~~~%s@%p == %p" , ary[i] , &ary[i] , (a_ptr + i));

    }

    for(i=0; i<5; i++)
    {
        printf("~~~%s@%p" , *(a_ptr + i) ,  (a_ptr + i));
    }

    return 0;
}

And now my output is:

$ ./a.out 
~~~0x100@0xbfc77a74 == 0xbfc77a74~~~0x101@0xbfc77a7c == 0xbfc77a7c~~~0x102@0xbfc77a84 == 0xbfc77a84~~~0x103@0xbfc77a8c == 0xbfc77a8c~~~0x104@0xbfc77a94 == 0xbfc77a94~~~0x100@0xbfc77a74~~~0x101@0xbfc77a7c~~~0x102@0xbfc77a84~~~0x103@0xbfc77a8c~~~0x104@0xbfc77a94

Is this what you were hoping to get?

Some code that relies only on pointers and no arrays:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h> /* for strcpy */
#include <stdlib.h> /* for free and malloc */

int main()
{

    char** two_d = malloc(sizeof(char*) * 5); /* allocate memory for 5 pointers to pointers */

    int i;
    for(i = 0; i < 5; i++) /* for each of the five elements */
    {
        two_d[i] = malloc(2); /* allocate memory to each member of two_d for a 2 char string */

        strcpy(two_d[i], "a"); /* store data in that particular element */

        printf("%s has address of %p\n", two_d[i], &two_d[i]); /* print the contents and the address */

        free(two_d[i]); /* free the memory pointer to by each pointer */
    }

    free(two_d); /* free the memory for the pointer to pointers */

    return 0;
}
  • Yes, it works great and output is exactly what was expected. But don't want to use pointer to array (char a_ptr[8]) and want to stick with pointer to pointer as it is same. Ok the problem is with dereferencing. printf("~~~%s@%p" , (a_ptr + i) , (a_ptr + i)); If deference without '' operator than the values can be accessed. Frankly, I have no idea why is that. Shouldn't *(a_ptr + i) syntax working? Or a_ptr[i] should work as well. – ila Jun 18 '13 at 3:11
  • char ary[5][8] only allocates memory for 40 characters, and no pointers. If you want pointers to pointers, then declare char *ary[5], and then initialize each of those five pointers with a different pointer to 8 chars. Pointers are not arrays. – Lee Daniel Crocker Jun 18 '13 at 3:20
  • Then howcome below can work. char **a_ptr = &ary; printf("~~~%s@%p" , (a_ptr + i) , (a_ptr + i)); This will show the values correctly. but still, dereferencing wont work! – ila Jun 18 '13 at 3:29
  • I'm honestly not convinced it works, the compiler emits a warning: ' warning: initialization from incompatible pointer type [enabled by default]'. When I run your original code (with the fix for printing pointer addresses) I get a segmentation fault. This is with GCC on Linux. – Nobilis Jun 18 '13 at 3:56
  • @Nobilis perhaps you are correct. Interestingly, it works with i686-apple-darwin11-llvm-gcc-4.2 complier. At-least I can see the correct output. But it certainly breaks here codepad.org/6hamacpH Any idea whats happening? – ila Jun 18 '13 at 4:47

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.