9

This is not a trick question:

[1,2,3].sort_by { |x, y| x <=> y }
=> [1, 2, 3] 

[1,2,3].sort_by { |x, y| y <=> x }
=> [1, 2, 3] 

What's going on here? I would have expected the arrays to be opposite one another (as they are with sort and the same parameters).

  • 5
    Take a look at: ruby-doc.org/core-2.0/Enumerable.html#method-i-sort_by you will definitely find your answer here. For future reference consult the ruby-doc your bound to find your answer here :) – David Jun 18 '13 at 22:58
  • 3
    I read the docs; just didn't notice the difference between sort and sort_by. But I do always appreciate being told to RTFM. That's the spirit of StackOverflow. – Chris B Jun 18 '13 at 23:08
19

#sort_by should just take one block parameter, an item from the array, and sorts based on the result of the block.

When passing it two block parameters, the second is set to nil and thus all block results are like 1 <=> nil which is nil so the order of the array is unchanged.

[1, 3, 2].sort_by { |x| x } # sorts using x <=> y
=> [1, 2, 3]

[1, 3, 2].sort_by { |x, y| x <=> y } # sorts using nil <=> nil
=> [1, 3, 2]
6
[1, 3, 2].sort_by { |x| x }
=> [1, 2, 3] 

[1, 3, 2].sort_by { |x| -x }
=> [3, 2, 1] 

[1, 3, 2].sort
=> [1, 2, 3] 

[1, 3, 2].sort.reverse
=> [3, 2, 1] 

[1, 3, 2].sort { |x, y| x <=> y }
=> [1, 2, 3] 

[1, 3, 2].sort { |x, y| y <=> x }
=> [3, 2, 1] 
  • Duh...I meant to pass the block to sort, not sort_by -- which, instead of failing noisily does all sorts of unusual things, especially if you're sorting objects (as I was in my actual code). Your answer was right (and first) but I picked @looby's because he pointed out that y = nil – Chris B Jun 18 '13 at 23:11
  • 8
    no prob, glad you are sorted – Ian Kenney Jun 18 '13 at 23:13

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