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I am developing a multi-tenant web application using MVC4 and EF5. I previously asked this question regarding filtering my DbContext: Is it bad practice to filter by ID within the repository pattern.

Apparently, my approach was sound, but it was suggested that rather than handling all filtering in that single repository, I provide a context already filtered to tenant level using 'a repository or DBContextWrapper class that would feed your [my] normal repository'.

Unfortunately I am no MVC expert, so I started implementing this as best I could, but upon researching filtering in EF for other multi-tenant applications I found a question for a very similar case Multi-tenancy web application with filtered dbContext, though completely failed to understand the answer to it.

In my application, the CompanyID is a property of the User class, so should be taken directly from the authenticated user. Eg:

int CompanyID = db.Users.Single(u => u.Email == User.Identity.Name).CompanyID;

My current approach does appear to work, however I'm pretty sure I have gone about it the wrong way and/or have done it inefficiently based on what I've seen in other Questions about doing the same sort of thing. In another question Solutions for a simple multi tenant web application with entity framework reflection is used to do this, but I'm not able to work out whether it would apply in my case, or even how to use it.

I would be extremely appreciative if anyone can explain the best way of going about this, and the pros/cons of differing ways. Thanks :)

My current implementation is as follows:

DB

  • One database, multiple tenants.
  • All tables link back to Company table one way or another, although not all have a CompanyID field.

TestController.cs

public class TestController : Controller
{
    private BookingSystemEntities db = new BookingSystemEntities();
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        var user = db.Users.Single(u => u.Email == User.Identity.Name);
        IBookingSystemRepository rep = new BookingSystemRepository(db, user);            
        return View(rep.GetAppointments(false));
    }

}

BookingSystemRepository.cs

public class BookingSystemRepository : IBookingSystemRepository
{
    private CompanyBookingSystemRepository db;

    public BookingSystemRepository(BookingSystemEntities context, User user)
    {
        this.db = new CompanyBookingSystemRepository(context, user);
    }

    public IEnumerable<Appointment> GetAppointments()
    { return GetAppointments(false); }

    public IEnumerable<Appointment> GetAppointments(bool includeDeleted)
    {
        return includeDeleted
            ? db.Appointments
            : db.Appointments.Where(a => a.Deleted.HasValue);
    }

    public IEnumerable<Client> GetClients()
    { return GetClients(false); }

    public IEnumerable<Client> GetClients(bool includeDeleted)
    {
        return includeDeleted
            ? db.Clients
            : db.Clients.Where(c => c.Deleted.HasValue);
    }

    public void Save()
    {
        db.SaveChanges();
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (db != null)
            db.Dispose();
    }
}

CompanyBookingSystemRepository.cs

public class CompanyBookingSystemRepository
{
    private BookingSystemEntities db;
    private User User;
    public IEnumerable<Appointment> Appointments { get { return db.Appointments.Where(a => a.User.CompanyID == User.CompanyID).AsEnumerable<Appointment>(); } }
    public IEnumerable<Client> Clients { get { return db.Clients.Where(a => a.CompanyID == User.CompanyID).AsEnumerable<Client>(); } }

    public CompanyBookingSystemRepository(BookingSystemEntities context, User user)
    {
        db = context;
        this.User = user;
    }

    public void SaveChanges()
    {
        db.SaveChanges();
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (db != null)
            db.Dispose();
    }
}
3
  • 2
    I think your approach is pretty solid, but maybe you want to look into using the Filter class that Zoran goes into here agile-code.com/blog/… this will make your code more clear and flexible since you can easily apply filters as needed.
    – SOfanatic
    Jun 20 '13 at 0:49
  • @SOfanatic Thanks for your reply, an interesting idea. I've read through the article and looked through the example solution but I'm still unsure how to go about filtering by the Users' CompanyID. Zoran says in the article that he needs to filer by the logged in user, but provides a different 'simpler' example. I apologise for my lack of MVC knowledge but is there a way to find the logged in User from the DbContext, or would I have to pass it to the constructor when I instantiate it within a controller? Or would I need to store the CompanyID as a session variable, or something else entirely? Jun 21 '13 at 10:46
  • saving the CompanyID as a session variable would probably be the best approach, since you don't want to keep querying the database to find out the CompanyID every time. After authenticating the user go ahead and save the CompanyID to a session variable.
    – SOfanatic
    Jun 21 '13 at 13:39
1

I like your approach better than some of the other examples you've provided. Filtering based on the logged-in user should be the most effective way to make sure you're filtering your data appropriately assuming each tenant runs off the same codebase and domain. (If not, you could utilize those to filter as well.)

If you're concerned about database performance with filtering tables that don't have a CompanyID you can purposely denormalize your database to include that field in those tables.

The reflection approach you cited, although elegant, seems overly complicated and like a lot more overhead than including the CompanyID in your db call (especially since the db call is happening in both instances).

EDIT (after comment):

As for the rest of it, you seem to have written a lot of excess code that's not really necessary (at least not within the example cited above). I don't necessarily understand why you're distinguishing between a BookingSystemRepository and a CompanyBookingSystemRepository since from your code it seems like the former exists only to pass calls through to the latter, which just filters results using the UserID (is there ever a situation where you wouldn't filter those results?).

You could eliminate both of those classes (and the issue you cite in your comment) entirely by just changing your method to:

public class TestController : Controller
{
    private BookingSystemEntities db = new BookingSystemEntities();
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        var user = db.Users.Single(u => u.Email == User.Identity.Name);
        var appointments = db.Appointments.Where(a => a.User.CompanyID == user.CompanyID).AsEnumerable();
        return View(appointments);
    }

    public override void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        db.Dispose();
        base.Dispose(disposing);
    }
}

From there, if you're worried about performance, you really should be doing all your filtering within the DB and then only call those procedures to return your data.

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  • Thanks for your feedback Chris. But does my approach not waste resources/time by instantiating the context for each controller, then for each action, finding the authenticated user and then instantiating two repositories? Jun 21 '13 at 10:25
  • 1
    The code you provided is identical to the code I'm already using for all my actions. The TestController was an example that I made for this question. The two reasons I wanted to implement a repository pattern: Firstly security, I need to ensure that no users of one company ever gain any sort of access to other companies data. If I do this in the repository it is impossible to accidentally miss in a controller action. Secondly, DRY. I have to filter by the CompanyID in EVERY controller action, whereas if its filtered already then it saves a lot of code. Please let me know your thoughts, Thanks. Jul 1 '13 at 15:27
  • 1
    Your assumption that it would be impossible to miss in the controller action is incorrect. In your TestController you're instantiating an instance of your BookingSystemEntities class, which gives direct access to all of the entities in the DB, regardless of CompanyId. It would be just as easy to use that direct instead of the respository as it would be to not filter the results. My suggestion is to filter the results with stored procs in the DB, only call your procs so a DB error results in a call with no CompanyId, and UNIT TEST, UNIT TEST, UNIT TEST!!! Jul 1 '13 at 16:38
  • @ChrisSearles WARNING with shared database !! Check this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/30745628/…
    – Rod
    Jun 10 '15 at 1:56
  • 1
    @MatthewHudson check my comment /\
    – Rod
    Jun 10 '15 at 1:56

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