20

Is it possible to modify code below to have printout from 'stdout 'and 'stderr':

  • printed on the terminal (in real time),
  • and finally stored in outs and errs variables?

The code:

#!/usr/bin/python3
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-

import subprocess

def run_cmd(command, cwd=None):
    p = subprocess.Popen(command, cwd=cwd, shell=False,
                         stdout=subprocess.PIPE,
                         stderr=subprocess.PIPE)
    outs, errs = p.communicate()
    rc = p.returncode
    outs = outs.decode('utf-8')
    errs = errs.decode('utf-8')

    return (rc, (outs, errs))

Thanks to @unutbu, special thanks for @j-f-sebastian, final function:

#!/usr/bin/python3
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-


import sys
from queue import Queue
from subprocess import PIPE, Popen
from threading import Thread


def read_output(pipe, funcs):
    for line in iter(pipe.readline, b''):
        for func in funcs:
            func(line.decode('utf-8'))
    pipe.close()


def write_output(get):
    for line in iter(get, None):
        sys.stdout.write(line)


def run_cmd(command, cwd=None, passthrough=True):
    outs, errs = None, None

    proc = Popen(
        command,
        cwd=cwd,
        shell=False,
        close_fds=True,
        stdout=PIPE,
        stderr=PIPE,
        bufsize=1
        )

    if passthrough:

        outs, errs = [], []

        q = Queue()

        stdout_thread = Thread(
            target=read_output, args=(proc.stdout, [q.put, outs.append])
            )

        stderr_thread = Thread(
            target=read_output, args=(proc.stderr, [q.put, errs.append])
            )

        writer_thread = Thread(
            target=write_output, args=(q.get,)
            )

        for t in (stdout_thread, stderr_thread, writer_thread):
            t.daemon = True
            t.start()

        proc.wait()

        for t in (stdout_thread, stderr_thread):
            t.join()

        q.put(None)

        outs = ' '.join(outs)
        errs = ' '.join(errs)

    else:

        outs, errs = proc.communicate()
        outs = '' if outs == None else outs.decode('utf-8')
        errs = '' if errs == None else errs.decode('utf-8')

    rc = proc.returncode

    return (rc, (outs, errs))
  • The code example does store outs and errs and returns them... To print to the terminal, simply if outs: print outs if errs: print errs – bnlucas Jun 19 '13 at 11:43
  • 2
    @bnlucas Thanks, but as I stated in first point: the output should be printed in REAL TIME to terminal, like as without PIPEing. – Łukasz Zdun Jun 19 '13 at 12:00
  • 2
    If you need Python 3 code; add python-3.x tag (i see python3 in the shebang). Your code as written will leave reading threads hanging. In Python 3 '' is a Unicode literal, but pipe.readline() returns bytes by default ('' != b"" on Python 3). If you fix it then the writer thread won't end, because nothing puts "" into the queue. – jfs Jun 19 '13 at 16:02
17

You could spawn threads to read the stdout and stderr pipes, write to a common queue, and append to lists. Then use a third thread to print items from the queue.

import time
import Queue
import sys
import threading
import subprocess
PIPE = subprocess.PIPE


def read_output(pipe, funcs):
    for line in iter(pipe.readline, ''):
        for func in funcs:
            func(line)
            # time.sleep(1)
    pipe.close()

def write_output(get):
    for line in iter(get, None):
        sys.stdout.write(line)

process = subprocess.Popen(
    ['random_print.py'], stdout=PIPE, stderr=PIPE, close_fds=True, bufsize=1)
q = Queue.Queue()
out, err = [], []
tout = threading.Thread(
    target=read_output, args=(process.stdout, [q.put, out.append]))
terr = threading.Thread(
    target=read_output, args=(process.stderr, [q.put, err.append]))
twrite = threading.Thread(target=write_output, args=(q.get,))
for t in (tout, terr, twrite):
    t.daemon = True
    t.start()
process.wait()
for t in (tout, terr):
    t.join()
q.put(None)
print(out)
print(err)

The reason for using the third thread -- instead of letting the first two threads both print directly to the terminal -- is to prevent both print statements from occurring concurrently, which can result in sometimes garbled text.


The above calls random_print.py, which prints to stdout and stderr at random:

import sys
import time
import random

for i in range(50):
    f = random.choice([sys.stdout,sys.stderr])
    f.write(str(i)+'\n')
    f.flush()
    time.sleep(0.1)

This solution borrows code and ideas from J. F. Sebastian, here.


Here is an alternative solution for Unix-like systems, using select.select:

import collections
import select
import fcntl
import os
import time
import Queue
import sys
import threading
import subprocess
PIPE = subprocess.PIPE

def make_async(fd):
    # https://stackoverflow.com/a/7730201/190597
    '''add the O_NONBLOCK flag to a file descriptor'''
    fcntl.fcntl(
        fd, fcntl.F_SETFL, fcntl.fcntl(fd, fcntl.F_GETFL) | os.O_NONBLOCK)

def read_async(fd):
    # https://stackoverflow.com/a/7730201/190597
    '''read some data from a file descriptor, ignoring EAGAIN errors'''
    # time.sleep(1)
    try:
        return fd.read()
    except IOError, e:
        if e.errno != errno.EAGAIN:
            raise e
        else:
            return ''

def write_output(fds, outmap):
    for fd in fds:
        line = read_async(fd)
        sys.stdout.write(line)
        outmap[fd.fileno()].append(line)

process = subprocess.Popen(
    ['random_print.py'], stdout=PIPE, stderr=PIPE, close_fds=True)

make_async(process.stdout)
make_async(process.stderr)
outmap = collections.defaultdict(list)
while True:
    rlist, wlist, xlist = select.select([process.stdout, process.stderr], [], [])
    write_output(rlist, outmap)
    if process.poll() is not None:
        write_output([process.stdout, process.stderr], outmap)
        break

fileno = {'stdout': process.stdout.fileno(),
          'stderr': process.stderr.fileno()}

print(outmap[fileno['stdout']])
print(outmap[fileno['stderr']])

This solution uses code and ideas from Adam Rosenfield's post, here.

  • you could add q.put(None) after process.wait() and exit the 3rd thread on None e.g., for line in iter(get, None):. Also pipe.close() is missing. – jfs Jun 19 '13 at 13:07
  • @J.F.Sebastian: Thanks for the corrections. Suppose read_output for some reason does not keep pace with the output being written to pipe. (I try to simulate that with a time.sleep(1) above). When the time.sleep(1) is uncommented, out and err fail to collect all the output before process.wait() completes. Do you know a way to guarantee that out and err get all the output? – unutbu Jun 19 '13 at 13:41
  • t{err,out}.join() before put(None). btw, to get lines in "real time", bufsize=1 might help (ignoring `block-buffering issue) – jfs Jun 19 '13 at 14:16
  • Ah, yes. Thanks again. – unutbu Jun 19 '13 at 14:30
19

To capture and display at the same time both stdout and stderr from a child process line by line in a single thread, you could use asynchronous I/O:

#!/usr/bin/env python3
import asyncio
import os
import sys
from asyncio.subprocess import PIPE

@asyncio.coroutine
def read_stream_and_display(stream, display):
    """Read from stream line by line until EOF, display, and capture the lines.

    """
    output = []
    while True:
        line = yield from stream.readline()
        if not line:
            break
        output.append(line)
        display(line) # assume it doesn't block
    return b''.join(output)

@asyncio.coroutine
def read_and_display(*cmd):
    """Capture cmd's stdout, stderr while displaying them as they arrive
    (line by line).

    """
    # start process
    process = yield from asyncio.create_subprocess_exec(*cmd,
            stdout=PIPE, stderr=PIPE)

    # read child's stdout/stderr concurrently (capture and display)
    try:
        stdout, stderr = yield from asyncio.gather(
            read_stream_and_display(process.stdout, sys.stdout.buffer.write),
            read_stream_and_display(process.stderr, sys.stderr.buffer.write))
    except Exception:
        process.kill()
        raise
    finally:
        # wait for the process to exit
        rc = yield from process.wait()
    return rc, stdout, stderr

# run the event loop
if os.name == 'nt':
    loop = asyncio.ProactorEventLoop() # for subprocess' pipes on Windows
    asyncio.set_event_loop(loop)
else:
    loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
rc, *output = loop.run_until_complete(read_and_display(*cmd))
loop.close()
  • This code looks good, could you add a version for Python 2.7? – kinORnirvana Apr 27 '16 at 17:01
  • @kinORnirvana: asyncio works only on Python 3.3+ There is trollius—a Python 2 clone but it is deprecated – jfs Apr 27 '16 at 17:09
  • Nice work, J.F! I just "borrowed" your code for this answer. If you have any comments, suggestions, &/or a better answer, they would be much appreciated. – PM 2Ring Dec 26 '16 at 11:40
  • Note that once the loop is closed doing get_event_loop will get you the same closed loop which cannot be re-used as is (event loop is closed message). I ended up doing asyncio.set_event_loop(asyncio.new_event_loop()) to get a fresh event loop. – Adversus Oct 20 '17 at 14:52
  • 1
    I was running this code in a Jupyter notebook. I was getting an AttributeError because sys.stdout.buffer no longer existed. This helped clear it up: docs.python.org/3/library/sys.html#sys.stderr When in a Jupyter notebook I used sys.stdout.write in lieu of sys.stdout.buffer.writeand the output appeared in the notebook logging output. – DMfll Jan 28 '18 at 21:48

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