150

No matter how its content is like.

Is it possible to do this?

  • 2
    There are lots of great answers here, but I don't see any mention of flexbox, so I thought I'd share this 2 cents: Having that parent div be 100% is one thing, but if the time comes to put, arrange, and center some content in that div, you'll want to look at flexbox. css-tricks.com/snippets/css/a-guide-to-flexbox – ArleyM Nov 22 '15 at 0:46

10 Answers 10

137

This always works for me:

<head>
    <title></title>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
    <style type="text/css">
        html, body {
            height: 100%;
            margin: 0;
        }

        #wrapper {
            min-height: 100%; 
        }
    </style>
    <!--[if lte IE 6]>
    <style type="text/css">
        #container {
            height: 100%;
        }
    </style>
    <![endif]-->
</head>

<body>
    <div id="wrapper">some content</div>
</body>

This is probably the simplest solution to this problem. Only need to set four CSS attributes (although one of them is only to make IE happy).

  • does not work for me.. chrome 32! :/ – Praveen Puglia Feb 16 '14 at 10:30
  • 1
    @AdamHarte Why it doesn't work if you remove the 'html' selector from the CSS? → body { height: 100%; margin: 0; } – Alex Prut Apr 12 '14 at 10:14
  • 2
    @P.Alex Math! If your HTML tags height stretches to fit its content, then the body height is 100% of its parent, then you will not be forcing it to 100% of the available space. – Adam Harte Apr 15 '14 at 21:46
98

This is my solution to create a fullscreen div, using pure css. It displays a full screen div that is persistent on scrolling. And if the page content fits on the screen, the page won't show a scroll-bar.

Tested in IE9+, Firefox 13+, Chrome 21+

<!doctype html>
<html>
<head>
  <meta charset="utf-8" />
  <title> Fullscreen Div </title>
  <style>
  .overlay {
    position: fixed;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    left: 0;
    top: 0;
    background: rgba(51,51,51,0.7);
    z-index: 10;
  }
  </style>
</head>
<body>
  <div class='overlay'>Selectable text</div>
  <p> This paragraph is located below the overlay, and cannot be selected because of that :)</p>
</body>
</html>

52

This is the most stable (and easy) way to do it, and it works in all modern browsers:

.fullscreen {
  position: fixed;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  right: 0;
  overflow: auto;
  background: lime; /* Just to visualize the extent */
  
}
<div class="fullscreen">
  Suspendisse aliquam in ante a ornare. Pellentesque quis sapien sit amet dolor euismod congue. Donec non semper arcu. Sed tortor ante, cursus in dui vitae, interdum vestibulum massa. Suspendisse aliquam in ante a ornare. Pellentesque quis sapien sit amet dolor euismod congue. Donec non semper arcu. Sed tortor ante, cursus in dui vitae, interdum vestibulum massa. Suspendisse aliquam in ante a ornare. Pellentesque quis sapien sit amet dolor euismod congue. Donec non semper arcu. Sed tortor ante, cursus in dui vitae, interdum vestibulum massa. Suspendisse aliquam in ante a ornare. Pellentesque quis sapien sit amet dolor euismod congue. Donec non semper arcu. Sed tortor ante, cursus in dui vitae, interdum vestibulum massa.
</div>

Tested to work in Firefox, Chrome, Opera, Vivaldi, IE7+ (based on emulation in IE11).

  • 1
    It works better if you use the following: position: fixed; top: 0; left: 0; and now the part that is different: width: 100%; height: 100%;. This actually works in older browsers flawlessly as well. – Aart den Braber Mar 17 '17 at 17:22
  • 1
    Why is it better to use width and height than using bottom and right? If you use width and height, and also want some padding and/or border, you also need to make sure that you have box-sizing: border-box;, otherwise you will get larger box that will cause scrolling. See this. – awe Mar 20 '17 at 8:51
27

The best way to do this with modern browsers would be to make use of Viewport-percentage Lengths, falling back to regular percentage lengths for browsers which do not support those units.

Viewport-percentage lengths are based upon the length of the viewport itself. The two units we will use here are vh (viewport height) and vw (viewport width). 100vh is equal to 100% of the height of the viewport, and 100vw is equal to 100% of the width of the viewport.

Assuming the following HTML:

<body>
    <div></div>
</body>

You can use the following:

html, body, div {
    /* Height and width fallback for older browsers. */
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;

    /* Set the height to match that of the viewport. */
    height: 100vh;

    /* Set the width to match that of the viewport. */
    width: 100vw;

    /* Remove any browser-default margins. */
    margin: 0;
}

Here is a JSFiddle demo which shows the div element filling both the height and width of the result frame. If you resize the result frame, the div element resizes accordingly.

18

I don't have IE Josh, could you please test this for me. Thanks.

<html>
<head>
    <title>Hellomoto</title>
    <style text="text/javascript">
        .hellomoto
        {
            background-color:#ccc;
            position:absolute;
            top:0px;
            left:0px;
            width:100%;
            height:100%;
            overflow:auto;
        }
        body
        {
            background-color:#ff00ff;
            padding:0px;
            margin:0px;
            width:100%;
            height:100%;
            overflow:hidden;
        }
        .text
        {
            background-color:#cc00cc;
            height:800px;
            width:500px;
        }
    </style>
</head>
<body>
<div class="hellomoto">
    <div class="text">hellomoto</div>
</div>
</body>
</html>
  • you don't need to set the widths to 100% – Adam Harte Nov 12 '09 at 9:01
  • I don't get it; you are hard-coding a height of 800px on the DIV. The OP wants this to be dynamic. – Josh Stodola Nov 12 '09 at 14:12
  • Yes, the hard-coded 800px is an example of dynamic content. – Tubbe Nov 12 '09 at 15:14
  • Oh sorry, didn't see that sneaking absolute in there (or top/left). Well it's fine then :) – Adam Harte Nov 12 '09 at 20:53
  • 1
    I've heard there are more modern ways of solving this. @Tubbe do you know if that's true? – bzlm Jan 20 '14 at 19:26
8

What I found the best elegant way is like the following, the most trick here is make the div's position: fixed.

.mask {
    background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);
    position: fixed;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    margin: 0;
    box-sizing: border-box;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    object-fit: contain;
}
<html>
  <head>
  <title>Test</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <h1>Whatever it takes</h1>
    <h1>Whatever it takes</h1>
    <h1>Whatever it takes</h1>
    <h1>Whatever it takes</h1>
    <h1>Whatever it takes</h1>
    <h1>Whatever it takes</h1>
    <h1>Whatever it takes</h1>
    <h1>Whatever it takes</h1>
    <h1>Whatever it takes</h1>
    <h1>Whatever it takes</h1>
    <h1>Whatever it takes</h1>
    <h1>Whatever it takes</h1>
    <h1>Whatever it takes</h1>
    <h1>Whatever it takes</h1>
    <h1>Whatever it takes</h1>
    <h1>Whatever it takes</h1>
    <h1>Whatever it takes</h1>
    <h1>Whatever it takes</h1>
    <h1>Whatever it takes</h1>
    <h1>Whatever it takes</h1>
    <div class="mask"></div>
    </body>
  </html>

The mask demo

7

Change the body element into a flex container and the div into a flex item:

body {
  display: flex;
  height: 100vh;
  margin: 0;
}

div {
  flex: 1;
  background: tan;
}
<div></div>

6

Here's the shortest solution, based on vh. Please note that vh is not supported in some older browsers.

CSS:

div {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100vh;
}

HTML:

<div>This div is fullscreen :)</div>
1

This is the trick I use. Good for responsive designs. Works perfectly when user tries to mess with browser resizing.

<head>
    <title></title>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
    <style type="text/css">
        #container {
            position: absolute;
            width: 100%;
            min-height: 100%;
            left: 0;
            top: 0;
        }
    </style>
</head>

<body>
    <div id="container">some content</div>
</body>
-8

Unfortunately, the height property in CSS is not as reliable as it should be. Therefore, Javascript will have to be used to set the height style of the element in question to the height of the users viewport. And yes, this can be done without absolute positioning...

<!DOCTYPE html>

<html>
  <head>
    <title>Test by Josh</title>
    <style type="text/css">
      * { padding:0; margin:0; }
      #test { background:#aaa; height:100%; width:100%; }
    </style>
    <script type="text/javascript">
      window.onload = function() {
        var height = getViewportHeight();

        alert("This is what it looks like before the Javascript. Click OK to set the height.");

        if(height > 0)
          document.getElementById("test").style.height = height + "px";
      }

      function getViewportHeight() {
        var h = 0;

        if(self.innerHeight)
          h = window.innerHeight;
        else if(document.documentElement && document.documentElement.clientHeight)
          h = document.documentElement.clientHeight;
        else if(document.body) 
          h = document.body.clientHeight;

        return h;
      }
    </script>
  </head>
  <body>
    <div id="test">
      <h1>Test</h1>
    </div>
  </body>
</html>
  • 1
    If you are using a library like jQuery (recommended), getting the height via $(window).height(); would be the best idea. – Josh Stodola Nov 12 '09 at 2:47
  • Is there a pure css solution? – Mask Nov 12 '09 at 2:53
  • @Mask No, there is not. Not yet anyways. – Josh Stodola Nov 12 '09 at 2:55
  • @Jed How about you try to apply a min-height:100% and try it in Mac-Safari and maybe we can reach a solution here. I think that would be better than arguing about platforms. – Josh Stodola Nov 12 '09 at 2:58
  • 3
    This works in IE7, Chrome3 and Safari4 and Opera10. All tested on Windows. Drawback is it uses javascript, which was something Mask wanted to avoid (see his comment on this answer). TandemAdams answer is pure CSS, and works on all the browsers I tested except Opera. – awe Nov 12 '09 at 8:54

protected by Roko C. Buljan Jan 15 '14 at 10:47

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