3

I have 2 actions in one controller

public ActionResult DoSomething()
{
    ...
}

public ActionResult SoSomethingAgain()
{
    ...
}

I would like to have both requests go to the same action.

perhaps an alias....

[ie. SoSomethingAgain]
public ActionResult DoSomething()
{
    ...
}

What is the proper approach?

  • Could you use this Attribute [ActionName("SoSomethingAgain")] for DoSomething Action Method ? – Imad Alazani Jun 19 '13 at 23:03
2

If SoSomethingAgain is the called action then the two earlier answers will run the code that is inside DoSomething, but the controller action and context is still SoSomethingAgain. This means that a return View() statement inside the DoSomething would look for a SoSomethingAgain view.

Similarly the pipeline would use filters defined on SoSomethingAgain, and not those on DoSomething. You can see this if you put an [Authorize] filter on DoSomething. If you hit the DoSomething action you will be prompted to log in, but if you hit the SoSomethingElse action you will not be prompted.

Maybe that's what you want, maybe not. If it isn't and you want to have both a DoSomething url and a SoSomethingElse url, but both running the same code, then get rid of the SoSomethingElse controller action, and add a custom route (before the default route).

routes.MapRoute(
  name: "SoSomethingAgainRoute",
  url: "{controller}/SoSomethingAgain/{id}",
  defaults: new { controller = "Home", action = "DoSomething", id = UrlParameter.Optional }
);
  • Your answer is now the best! Exactly what I was looking for! – Pinch Jun 20 '13 at 18:03
7

If I'm reading this correctly you can just do:

public ActionResult DoSomething()
{
    ...
}

public ActionResult SoSomethingAgain()
{
    return DoSomething();
}
  • Ha - Michael types faster than me :) – Richard Seal Jun 19 '13 at 19:57
  • very good, you are correct, i was wondering if there would be an approach that takes away the controller? – Pinch Jun 19 '13 at 20:01
5

In SoSomethingAgain just do this:

return DoSomething();

The only other option you have would be to build a specific Route for that controller when you setup routes at the start of the application. That's going to be a lot more work than it's worth.

  • very good, you are correct, i was wondering if there would be an approach that takes away the controller? – Pinch Jun 19 '13 at 20:01
  • 1
    @Pinch, building the specific Route would take away the controller. You could route SoSomethingAgain to DoSomething, but I'm just saying that the code is more work than it's worth and it's a lot more obfuscated that way. When you write the code this way it's very easy for the maintainer to see what's going on rather than debugging why in the world SoSomethingAgain even works. – Mike Perrenoud Jun 19 '13 at 20:03
  • +1 for teaching me "obfuscated" and for a great explanation – Pinch Jun 19 '13 at 20:24

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