18

Is there a way to mark a CSS rule as less important, such that it doesn't override a subsequent rule even if the first rule has higher specifically? For example, say I have the following in my CSS file:

#inputDiv input[type="text"]{
    width:125px;
}

#differentInput1{
    width:25px;
}

#differentInput2{
    width:500px;
}

The idea I was going for is that all text input fields that are children of the div "inputDiv" get a width of 125px, except for certain specific inputs that get some other width. The problem is that the first declaration overrides the specific item declarations.

I've tried the following:

  1. Append !important to each of the specific widths. Works, but many claim (rightly, I think) that !important should be avoided, and it is rather cumbersome as it must be added to each element with a specific width.
  2. Prepend #inputDiv to each of the specific selectors, i.e. #inputDiv #differentInput1 Again, works, and avoids the issues with using !important, but still cumbersome as it has to be done to each element.

Is there any way to simply say that the items in the first declaration are less important, and shouldn't override anything?

13

There's no way to do this since it's antithetical to CSS in the same way that !important is -- doing the opposite would be just as abusive. Your only option is to rely on selector specificity. You can write this in a way that is not as cumbersome by using a class for inputDiv instead of an ID, for example.

  • Thanks. I didn't realize that the class selector was significantly lower than the ID selector, although it makes sense in retrospect. – ibrewster Jun 19 '13 at 20:52
  • Clearly a wrong assertion. The cascade is an important mechanic, but not the objective of css. In Scss you have the !default modifier, so anything can override it. If it existed in CSS libraries could provide a default style that never overruled the one you define. – Henrik Vendelbo May 21 '18 at 21:37
  • Clearly, CSS's default means of assigning priority is inadequate, or we wouldn't have !important. So manually adjusting it either relatively or absolutely would simply be a more flexible alternative to !important. – Adam Leggett Oct 18 '18 at 15:26
4

maybe a way to solve you problem or answer your question you could try something like this

(http://jsfiddle.net/6aAF5/)

<div class="inputDiv big"> BIG</div>
<div class="inputDiv middle"> MIDDLE</div>
<div class="inputDiv small"> small</div>
<p>
    <div class="inputDiv"> normal</div>
</p>


<style type="text/css">
    .inputDiv {
        background-color:green;
        width:200px;
        height:20px;
    }
    .inputDiv.big {
        background-color:red;
        width:400px;
    }
    .inputDiv.middle {
        background-color:lime;
        width:100px;
    }
    .inputDiv.small {
        background-color:orange;
        width:50px;
    }
</style>

and little explanation about the !important

!important in a css file is used to override styles which are defind directly in the html. this means if you have

<div class="isItImportant" style="background-color:red;width:100px;height:100px;"></div>

<style type="text/css">

    /* this changes the styling */
    .isItImportant {
        background-color:green !important;
    }


    /* this doesn't change anything */
    .isItImportant {
        background-color:fuchsia;
    }

</style>

(http://jsfiddle.net/6aAF5/2/)

3

You can avoid these issues by being smarter about your selectors, as others have noted. As a best practice, avoid IDs whenever possible, and try to use just one or two selectors for any given set of styling.

For example, rather than:

#inputDiv input[type="text"]{
    width:125px;
}

#differentInput1{
    width:25px;
}

#differentInput2{
    width:500px;
}

You might try doing this:

input[type="text"]{
    width:125px;
}

.differentInput1{
    width:25px;
}

.differentInput2{
    width:500px;
}

If you need more specificity than that, something like this would also work:

.inputDiv input[type="text"]{
    width:125px;
}

.inputDiv .differentInput1{
    width:25px;
}

.inputDiv .differentInput2{
    width:500px;
}

Ultimately though, you want consistent styling throughout your site, so you shouldn't need to get so granular. You might want to look into OOCSS, which was great in helping me write lighter-weight, more scalable CSS.

http://coding.smashingmagazine.com/2011/12/12/an-introduction-to-object-oriented-css-oocss/ http://oocss.org/

  • Consistent styling, yes, but field widths are more dependent on content than on site styling. That is, a text field to hold a name needs to be larger than a text field to hold an age. At least, that's my opinion. Of course, you still need to make sure things line up and look nice :) – ibrewster Jun 19 '13 at 20:56
  • 1
    Oh totally. But if you start thinking about your elements as parts of larger system rather than just a very specific tool for a very specific problem, you can move away from some of the specificity and instead create reusable classes. For example, .input-half, .input-third etc. instead of #input1 and #input2. – Chris Ferdinandi Jun 19 '13 at 21:13
  • Ah, I see. Even if I went to something like .inputTwoChar, .inputThreeChar, etc, those are still broad classes that can be used in many places rather than applied to one specific element. – ibrewster Jun 20 '13 at 16:37
  • Exactly! It can result in less "repeating yourself" in the code. – Chris Ferdinandi Jun 21 '13 at 11:16
1

Well, there are some ways to achieve what you want to (if you don't want to do a lot of change),

  1. Change your div id="inputDiv" to a class name class="inputDiv", and change your css selector to .inputDiv. This way your 1st declaration won't override your proceeding declarations.

  2. Use LESS or SASS, which allow you to namespace css rules.

  3. And lastly, You can override the (unwanted) styles using jQuery, but it's an unnecessary overhead.

PS: Being descriptive in CSS is rather helpful although it's cumbersome.

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