.activity_rounded  {
    -webkit-border-radius: 50%;
    -moz-border-radius: 50%;
    border-radius: 50%;
    -khtml-border-radius: 50%;
    border: 3px solid #fff;
    behavior: url(css/PIE.htc);
}
<img src="img/demo/avatar_3.jpg" class="activity_rounded" alt="" />

This is my CSS & HTML. I want to make an image look like a circle. Everything works fine in IE8+, Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox. But Safari is acting kinda strange. Here is a demo picture: enter image description here

  • 6
    Safari for Mac/iOS, or for Windows? It's worth noting that the Windows version isn't supported anymore... – Tieson T. Jun 19 '13 at 22:02
  • Safari on Mac. And I cannot figure out why does Safari behave like this... – Ivanka Todorova Jun 19 '13 at 22:18
  • If you can change the radius for different browsers seprately then increase it for safari! :) – Mohammad Areeb Siddiqui Jun 19 '13 at 22:18
  • It doesn't matter what value I set. I can, for example, do something like 100px (on 40px picture) and no effect. – Ivanka Todorova Jun 19 '13 at 22:20
  • If possible, try setting values in px and see if that makes a difference. BTW, you don't need vendor prefixes for border-radius anymore. Also, it could be a safari bug that'll fix itself during an update. – frenchie Jun 20 '13 at 1:10

10 Answers 10

up vote 107 down vote accepted

To illustrate the problem in Safari, let's begin with a plain image.

Here we have an image of 100px x 100px. Adding a border of 3px increases the element dimensions to 106px x 106px:

Now we give it a border radius of 20%:

You can see it starts cropping from the outer boundary of the element, not from the image itself.

Further increasing the magnitude to 50%:

And changing the border color to white:

You can now see how the issue arises.

Because of such behavior of the browser, when creating an image in a circle with a border, we have to make sure both the image and the border are given a border radius. One way to ensure this is to separate the border from the image by placing the image inside a container, and apply border radius to both of them.

<div class="activity_rounded"><img src="http://placehold.it/100" /></div>
.activity_rounded {
    display: inline-block;
    -webkit-border-radius: 50%;
    -moz-border-radius: 50%;
    border-radius: 50%;
    -khtml-border-radius: 50%;
    border: 3px solid #fff;
}

.activity_rounded img  {
    -webkit-border-radius: 50%;
    -moz-border-radius: 50%;
    border-radius: 50%;
    -khtml-border-radius: 50%;
    vertical-align: middle;
}

And now we have a nice circle border around the image on Safari.

See DEMO.

  • 3
    You, sir, are awesome! Thank you for your time. It works! :) – Ivanka Todorova Jun 20 '13 at 10:09
  • 2
    +1 Excellent answer – mate64 Jun 20 '13 at 10:15
  • 2
    Two points of note: 1. border radius is now well supported to the point that you can dro vendor prefixes. 2. when using vendor prefixes, state the generic after all vendor specific ones. Great answer to this question, btw! – Chris Ferdinandi Jun 20 '13 at 11:25
  • 1
    @TiesonT. Sounds reasonable, but changing box-sizing has no effect on Safari. Just tested it. – Antony Jun 21 '13 at 5:08
  • 3
    @Julian It appears to be fixed in Safari 7.0. – Antony Dec 5 '13 at 2:20

Seems this one works:

.wrap{
   -webkit-transform: translateZ(0);
   -webkit-mask-image: -webkit-radial-gradient(circle, white 100%, black 100%);
}

http://jsfiddle.net/qWdf6/82/

  • This worked for me perfectly! Thanks. – Nick M Oct 6 '14 at 23:44
  • Worked for me, except I didn't use -webkit-transform and I added border-radius: xx% – Alex W Oct 16 '14 at 21:11
  • You sir, are a boss. – Nikolay Dyankov Apr 23 '15 at 14:14
  • Still doesnt work properly if you add a border: jsfiddle.net/qWdf6/631 – Toniq May 12 '16 at 10:51
  • Same thing but with clip-path: -webkit-clip-path: circle(50% at 50% 50%); – bfred.it Oct 5 '16 at 11:40

Have you tried the longhand markup?

-webkit-border-top-left-radius 
-webkit-border-top-right-radius 
-webkit-border-bottom-left-radius 
-webkit-border-bottom-right-radius 

It seems like there are some bugs on using the short-hand notation with some versions of Safari.

  • Nothing changed. – Ivanka Todorova Jun 20 '13 at 10:00
  • I tried in Safari 5.1 under windows and it didn't help solve the problem. – Julian Nov 20 '13 at 15:36

Simple way i did was use rounded PNG images and apply a border and radius of 50%

example :

http://www.laugfs.lk/#ourbusiness

Just simply use box-shadow if you don't care the old browsers.

.rounded {
  box-shadow: 0 0 0 10px pink;
}

Instead of putting the border on the image itself, put it on the container. Make sure the border-radius is on both the image and the container

.img-container {
    border-radius 100%;
    border: solid 1px #000;
    overflow: hidden;
}

.img {
    border-radius: 100%;
}

Try this by adding overflow: hidden; to the set of rules. This is an issue with all the webkit browsers:

.activity_rounded  {
    -webkit-border-radius: 50%;
     -khtml-border-radius: 50%;
       -moz-border-radius: 50%;
            border-radius: 50%;
    border: 3px solid #fff;
    behavior: url(css/PIE.htc);
    overflow: hidden;
}
  • I tried in Safari 5.1 under windows and it didn't help solve the problem. – Julian Nov 20 '13 at 15:35

If the image's border radius is set the same as its parent div, the accepted solution works fine for circular images but not rounded rectangles because the width of the image is less than that of its parent div and the border radius needs to be scaled in proportion to the image, otherwise the image will appear more rounded than the parent div and there will be a gap between the inside edges of the parent div and the outside edges of the image.

However, if you can specify your div/image widths in absolute dimensions it's possible to set a border radius for the image so that it will fit exactly inside its parent div, by taking into account the border width.

HTML:

<div class="image-container-1"><img src="my_image.jpg" /></div>
<div class="image-container-2"><img src="my_image.jpg" /></div>

CSS:

.image-container-1 {
    border: 6px solid #FF0000;
    border-radius: 20px;
    -moz-border-radius: 20px;
    -webkit-border-radius: 20px;
    height: 250px;
    overflow: hidden;
    width: 250px;
}

.image-container-2 {
    border: 6px solid #FF0000;
    border-radius: 20px;
    -moz-border-radius: 20px;
    -webkit-border-radius: 20px;
    height: 250px;
    overflow: hidden;
    width: 250px;
}

.image-container-2 img {
     border-radius: 14px; /* 20px border radius - 6px border */
     -moz-border-radius: 14px;
     -webkit-border-radius: 14px;
     height: 250px;
     width: 250px;
 }

RESULT: Border radius clipping example for Safari 5.1.0 and Firefox 35.1.0

This solution was also tested in Internet Explorer 9 and Chrome 43 and the results were the same.

But if you have a border with radius on a div and inside it you have dynamic content (like if you click on that div, it slides down and show some other content), and you want to redesign your border with the same radius, you can use an aux class that redraw the radius (but the hack is that if you don't change the colour of the border the webkit will not redraw it).

Eg:

$(document).on('click', '.parent', function(e){	$('.content').toggleClass('opened').slideToggle(300);
	$(this).toggleClass('refreshBorders');
});
.parent{
cursor:pointer;
text-align:center;
-webkit-border:2px solid black;
-moz-border:2px solid black;
border:2px solid black;
-webkit-border-radius:50px;
-moz-border-radius:50px;
border-radius:50px;
-webkit-background-clip:padding-box;
transition: all 0.15s ease-in-out;
}

.content{
text-align:center;
display:none;
}
.opened{
display:inline-block;
}
.refreshBorders{
-webkit-border:2px solid red;
-moz-border:2px solid red;
border:2px solid red;
-webkit-border-radius:50px;
-moz-border-radius:50px;
border-radius:50px;
-webkit-background-clip:padding-box;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div class="parent">

 <div class="first">
  <h1> title </h1>
 </div>
 <div class="content">
  <p> content content content</p>
 </div>

</div>

do not use the position:relative|absolute style attribute for your overflow:hidden rounded corner item

for example

<style>
.rounded_corner_style
{
background-color: #00FF00;
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    overflow: hidden;
    border-radius:100px; /* you can also use border-radius:100% | border-radius:2px*/
}
</style>

<div class="rounded_corner_style">
        <img src="https://i.stack.imgur.com/Kgblc.png" style="height:100%"/>
 </div>

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