63

I'm trying to recreate this image with CSS:

wayvy shape

I would not need it to repeat. This is what I started but it just has a straight line:

#wave {
  position: absolute;
  height: 70px;
  width: 600px;
  background: #e0efe3;
}
<div id="wave"></div>

  • 1
    if u want to re create this with css just for size use SVG instead – Cameron A Jun 19 '13 at 22:42
  • Did you have any thoughts? Anything that you tried? – David Fritsch Jun 19 '13 at 22:45
  • Why not just use a background image? At times it is best to not abuse or "leverage" the power of CSS when a simple .png image would cost you maybe 20 bytes. – ProfileTwist Jun 20 '13 at 0:17
  • 1
    For double curved shapes, you can check this question : Double curved shape – web-tiki May 1 '15 at 15:42
  • I found this bootsnipp.com/snippets/yN3Zo – core114 Jun 21 at 8:57
70

I'm not sure it's your shape but it's close - you can play with the values:

https://jsfiddle.net/7fjSc/9/

#wave {
  position: relative;
  height: 70px;
  width: 600px;
  background: #e0efe3;
}
#wave:before {
  content: "";
  display: block;
  position: absolute;
  border-radius: 100% 50%;
  width: 340px;
  height: 80px;
  background-color: white;
  right: -5px;
  top: 40px;
}
#wave:after {
  content: "";
  display: block;
  position: absolute;
  border-radius: 100% 50%;
  width: 300px;
  height: 70px;
  background-color: #e0efe3;
  left: 0;
  top: 27px;
}
<div id="wave"></div>

  • 1
    This falls apart without a set width. I always need width=100%. Nice job though. – M H May 21 '15 at 21:44
  • 2
    There's an unsighty gap where both pseudo elements meet. – Fabien Snauwaert May 6 at 21:42
65

I think this is the right way to make a shape like you want. By using the SVG possibilities, and an container to keep the shape responsive.

svg {
  display: inline-block;
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
}
.container {
  display: inline-block;
  position: relative;
  width: 100%;
  padding-bottom: 100%;
  vertical-align: middle;
  overflow: hidden;
}
<div class="container">
  <svg viewBox="0 0 500 500" preserveAspectRatio="xMinYMin meet">
    <path d="M0,100 C150,200 350,0 500,100 L500,00 L0,0 Z" style="stroke: none; fill:red;"></path>
  </svg>
</div>

  • 13
    Where can one learn to make shapes? – Satbir Kira Nov 13 '15 at 9:56
  • 1
    Although its possible for you to draw and animate shapes with SVG but most people export their SVG files from Vector based software like Corel or Illustrator and Insert in the HTML file, then you can style more with CSS or even manipulate the Nodes with JS or SVG Libraries. and Thats the Case for SVG because It is supposed to solve the difficulties with drawing in CSS – Cameron A Aug 7 '16 at 23:21
  • I built up on this in my answer by adding two divs to make the example more realistic, cropping the SVG to get rid of unwanted margins, and removing the inline SVG in favor of a CSS solution. – Fabien Snauwaert May 6 at 22:09
27

My implementation uses the svg element in html and I also made a generator for making the wave you want:

https://smooth.ie/blogs/news/svg-wavey-transitions-between-sections

<div style="height: 150px; overflow: hidden;">
  <svg viewBox="0 0 500 150" preserveAspectRatio="none" style="height: 100%; width: 100%;">
    <path d="M0.00,92.27 C216.83,192.92 304.30,8.39 500.00,109.03 L500.00,0.00 L0.00,0.00 Z" style="stroke: none;fill: #e1efe3;"></path>
  </svg>
</div>

https://jsfiddle.net/1b8L7nax/5/

17

My pure CSS implementation based on above with 100% width. Hope it helps!

#wave-container {
  width: 100%;
  height: 100px;
  overflow: hidden;
}

#wave {
  display: block;
  position: relative;
  height: 40px;
  background: black;
}

#wave:before {
  content: "";
  display: block;
  position: absolute;
  border-radius: 100%;
  width: 100%;
  height: 300px;
  background-color: white;
  right: -25%;
  top: 20px
}

#wave:after {
  content: "";
  display: block;
  position: absolute;
  border-radius: 100%;
  width: 100%;
  height: 300px;
  background-color: black;
  left: -25%;
  top: -240px;
}
<div id="wave-container">
  <div id="wave">
  </div>
</div>

  • 1
    Without inspecting the code too deeply, this seems better than the currently accepted answer, which for me (Firefox 61.0a1) displays a few straight horizontal pixels in the middle. – Sebastian Simon Mar 29 '18 at 6:59
  • HOW... Teach me – Martin Zvarík Dec 4 '18 at 21:52
  • Change the colors and you'll see :) – PVermeer Feb 14 at 6:57
9

I like ThomasA's answer, but wanted a more realistic context with the wave being used to separate two divs. So I created a more complete demo where the separator SVG gets positioned perfectly between the two divs.

css wavy divider in CSS

Now I thought it would be cool to take it further. What if we could do this all in CSS without the need for the inline SVG? The point being to avoid extra markup. Here's how I did it:

Two simple <div>:

/** CSS using pseudo-elements: **/

#A {
  background: #0074D9;
}

#B {
  background: #7FDBFF;
}

#A::after {
  content: "";
  position: relative;
  left: -3rem;
  /* padding * -1 */
  top: calc( 3rem - 4rem / 2);
  /* padding - height/2 */
  float: left;
  display: block;
  height: 4rem;
  width: 100vw;
  background: hsla(0, 0%, 100%, 0.5);
  background-image: url("data:image/svg+xml,%3Csvg xmlns='http://www.w3.org/2000/svg' viewBox='0 70 500 60' preserveAspectRatio='none'%3E%3Crect x='0' y='0' width='500' height='500' style='stroke: none; fill: %237FDBFF;' /%3E%3Cpath d='M0,100 C150,200 350,0 500,100 L500,00 L0,0 Z' style='stroke: none; fill: %230074D9;'%3E%3C/path%3E%3C/svg%3E");
  background-size: 100% 100%;
}


/** Cosmetics **/

* {
  margin: 0;
}

#A,
#B {
  padding: 3rem;
}

div {
  font-family: monospace;
  font-size: 1.2rem;
  line-height: 1.2;
}

#A {
  color: white;
}
<div id="A">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Vivamus nec quam tincidunt, iaculis mi non, hendrerit felis. Nulla pretium lectus et arcu tempus, quis luctus ex imperdiet. In facilisis nulla suscipit ornare finibus. …
</div>

<div id="B" class="wavy">… In iaculis fermentum lacus vel porttitor. Vestibulum congue elementum neque eget feugiat. Donec suscipit diam ligula, aliquam consequat tellus sagittis porttitor. Sed sodales leo nisl, ut consequat est ornare eleifend. Cras et semper mi, in porta nunc.</div>

Demo Wavy divider (with CSS pseudo-elements to avoid extra markup)

It was a bit trickier to position than with an inline SVG but works just as well. (Could use CSS custom properties or pre-processor variables to keep the height and padding easy to read.)

To edit the colors, you need to edit the URL-encoded SVG itself.

Pay attention (like in the first demo) to a change in the viewBox to get rid of unwanted spaces in the SVG. (Another option would be to draw a different SVG.)

Another thing to pay attention to here is the background-size set to 100% 100% to get it to stretch in both directions.

3

Here's another way to do it :) The concept is to create a clip-path polygon with the wave as one side.

This approach is fairly flexible. You can change the position (left, right, top or bottom) in which the wave appears, change the wave function to any function(t) which maps to [0,1]). The polygon can also be used for shape-outside, which lets text flow around the wave when in 'left' or 'right' orientation.

At the end, an example you can uncomment which demonstrates animating the wave.

 

function PolyCalc(f /*a function(t)  from [0, infinity) => [0, 1]*/, 
                  s, /*a slice function(y, i) from y [0,1] => [0, 1], with slice index, i, in [0, n]*/
									w /*window size in seconds*/,
                  n /*sample size*/,
                  o /*orientation => left/right/top/bottom - the 'flat edge' of the polygon*/ 
                  ) 
{
	this.polyStart = "polygon(";
  this.polyLeft = this.polyStart + "0% 0%, "; //starts in the top left corner
  this.polyRight = this.polyStart + "100% 0%, "; //starts in the top right corner
  this.polyTop = this.polyStart + "0% 0%, "; // starts in the top left corner
  this.polyBottom = this.polyStart + "0% 100%, ";//starts in the bottom left corner
  
  var self = this;
  self.mapFunc = s;
  this.func = f;
  this.window = w;
  this.count = n;
  var dt = w/n;  

  switch(o) {
    case "top":
      this.poly = this.polyTop; break;
    case "bottom":
      this.poly = this.polyBottom; break;
  	case "right":
    	this.poly = this.polyRight; break;
  	case "left":
  	default:
  		this.poly = this.polyLeft; break;
    }
    
  this.CalcPolygon = function(t) {
  	var p = this.poly;
    for (i = 0; i < this.count; i++) {
      x = 100 * i/(this.count-1.0);
      y = this.func(t + i*dt);
      if (typeof self.mapFunc !== 'undefined')
      	y=self.mapFunc(y, i);
      y*=100;
      switch(o) {
        case "top": 
          p += x + "% " + y + "%, "; break;
        case "bottom":
          p += x + "% " + (100-y) + "%, "; break;
      	case "right":
        	p += (100-y) + "% " + x + "%, "; break;
      	case "left":
        default:
        	p += y + "% " + x + "%, "; break;          
      }
    }
    
    switch(o) { 
      case "top":
        p += "100% 0%)"; break;
      case "bottom":
        p += "100% 100%)";
        break;
    	case "right":
      	p += "100% 100%)"; break;
    	case "left":
      default:
      	p += "0% 100%)"; break;
    }
    
    return p;
  }
};

var text = document.querySelector("#text");
var divs = document.querySelectorAll(".wave");
var freq=2*Math.PI; //angular frequency in radians/sec
var windowWidth = 1; //the time domain window which determines the range from [t, t+windowWidth] that will be evaluated to create the polygon
var sampleSize = 60;
divs.forEach(function(wave) {
  var loc = wave.classList[1];

  var polyCalc = new PolyCalc(
	  function(t) { //The time domain wave function
  	  return (Math.sin(freq * t) + 1)/2; //sine is [-1, -1], so we remap to [0,1]
    },
    function(y, i) { //slice function, takes the time domain result and the slice index and returns a new value in [0, 1]  
      return MapRange(y, 0.0, 1.0, 0.65, 1.0);  //Here we adjust the range of the wave to 'flatten' it out a bit.  We don't use the index in this case, since it is irrelevant
    },
    windowWidth, //1 second, which with an angular frequency of 2pi rads/sec will produce one full period.
    sampleSize, //the number of samples to make, the larger the number, the smoother the curve, but the more pionts in the final polygon
    loc //the location
  );
  
    var polyText = polyCalc.CalcPolygon(0);
    wave.style.clipPath = polyText;
    wave.style.shapeOutside = polyText;
    wave.addEventListener("click",function(e) {document.querySelector("#polygon").innerText = polyText;});
  });

function MapRange(value, min, max, newMin, newMax) {
  return value * (newMax - newMin)/(max-min) + newMin;
}

//Animation - animate the wave by uncommenting this section
//Also demonstrates a slice function which uses the index of the slice to alter the output for a dampening effect.
/*
var t = 0;
var speed = 1/180;

var polyTop = document.querySelector(".top");

var polyTopCalc = new PolyCalc(
	  function(t) {
  	  return (Math.sin(freq * t) + 1)/2;
    },
    function(y, i) {       
      return MapRange(y, 0.0, 1.0, (sampleSize-i)/sampleSize, 1.0);
    },
    windowWidth, sampleSize, "top"
  );

function animate() {
		var polyT = polyTopCalc.CalcPolygon(t);    
    t+= speed;
    polyTop.style.clipPath = polyT;    
    requestAnimationFrame(animate);
}

requestAnimationFrame(animate);
*/
div div {
  padding:10px;
  /*overflow:scroll;*/
}

.left {
  height:100%;
  width:35%;
  float:left;
}

.right {
  height:200px;
  width:35%;
  float:right;
}

.top { 
  width:100%;
  height: 200px;  
}

.bottom {
  width:100%;
  height:200px;
}

.green {
  background:linear-gradient(to bottom, #b4ddb4 0%,#83c783 17%,#52b152 33%,#008a00 67%,#005700 83%,#002400 100%); 
} 

.mainContainer {
  width:100%;
  float:left;
}

#polygon {
  padding-left:20px;
  margin-left:20px;
  width:100%;
}
<div class="mainContainer">

  <div class="wave top green">
    Click to see the polygon CSS
  </div>
  
  <!--div class="wave left green">
  </div-->
  <!--div class="wave right green">
  </div-->  
  <!--div class="wave bottom green"></div-->  
</div>
<div id="polygon"></div>

3

Recently an awesome tool called Get Waves was introduced where you can simply from UI create your own waves and then export this to SVG format. This is as simple as going to the https://getwaves.io/ website and enjoying it!

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