257

I have an interface in TypeScript.

interface Employee{
    id: number;
    name: string;
    salary: number;
}

I would like to make salary as a nullable field (Like we can do in C#). Is this possible to do in TypeScript?

287

All fields in JavaScript (and in TypeScript) can have the value null or undefined.

You can make the field optional which is different from nullable.

interface Employee1 {
    name: string;
    salary: number;
}

var a: Employee1 = { name: 'Bob', salary: 40000 }; // OK
var b: Employee1 = { name: 'Bob' }; // Not OK, you must have 'salary'
var c: Employee1 = { name: 'Bob', salary: undefined }; // OK
var d: Employee1 = { name: null, salary: undefined }; // OK

// OK
class SomeEmployeeA implements Employee1 {
    public name = 'Bob';
    public salary = 40000;
}

// Not OK: Must have 'salary'
class SomeEmployeeB implements Employee1 {
    public name: string;
}

Compare with:

interface Employee2 {
    name: string;
    salary?: number;
}

var a: Employee2 = { name: 'Bob', salary: 40000 }; // OK
var b: Employee2 = { name: 'Bob' }; // OK
var c: Employee2 = { name: 'Bob', salary: undefined }; // OK
var d: Employee2 = { name: null, salary: 'bob' }; // Not OK, salary must be a number

// OK, but doesn't make too much sense
class SomeEmployeeA implements Employee2 {
    public name = 'Bob';
}
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  • 36
    Looks like strictly nullable types and strict null-checks have been implemented and will arrive with Typescript 2.0! (or typescript@next now.) – mindplay.dk Jun 22 '16 at 14:36
  • are you sure about var c in the first example? It seems to me that var b and var c are the same there. – martinp999 Feb 3 '19 at 23:06
  • In order to set null or undefined value without compilation error, the tsconfig "strict" option must be removed or equals to "false" "strict" : false – Nicolas Janel Mar 19 '19 at 8:38
  • 3
    This is incorrect. JS distinguish between null and undefined. Correct code should be salary:number|null; If you do salary?:number; salary = null; You will get an error. However, salary = undefined; will work just fine in this case. Solution: use Union i.e. '|' – Ankur Nigam Apr 21 at 6:19
131

Union type is in my mind best option in this case:

interface Employee{
   id: number;
   name: string;
   salary: number | null;
}

// Both cases are valid
let employe1: Employee = { id: 1, name: 'John', salary: 100 };
let employe2: Employee = { id: 1, name: 'John', salary: null };

EDIT : For this to work as expected, you should enable the strictNullChecks in tsconfig.

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  • 10
    If you use --strictNullChecks (which you should), this is a valid solution. I would not use it in favour of optional members, since it forces you to add an explicit null on all literal objects, but for function return values, it is the way to go. – geon Nov 30 '16 at 7:57
92

To be more C# like, define the Nullable type like this:

type Nullable<T> = T | null;

interface Employee{
   id: number;
   name: string;
   salary: Nullable<number>;
}

Bonus:

To make Nullable behave like a built in Typescript type, define it in a global.d.ts definition file in the root source folder. This path worked for me: /src/global.d.ts

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  • 1
    My favourite answer - directly answers the question without reading into it. – Lqueryvg Apr 13 at 12:57
  • 1
    Using this breaks the auto-completion of object properties. For example if we have emp: Partial<Employee>, we can do emp.id or emp.name etc but if we have emp: Nullable<Employee>, we can't do emp.id – Yousuf Khan Apr 17 at 14:04
  • 1
    This is the actual answer to the question. – Patrick Jun 8 at 12:33
  • @YousufKhan That is true. That's probably because since emp is potentially nullable, the id property might be invalid. To make the code robust, you should probably use an if block to check for null first, like this: if (emp) { console.log(emp.id); } If you use such an if-block, the TypeScript compiler and the editor "see" that the object inside the block is not null and thus will not generate errors and allow auto completion inside the if-block. (It works well in my Visual Studio 2019 editor and I assume it will work in Visual Studio Code too. But I don't know about other editors.) – Bart Hofland Aug 12 at 5:57
  • @YousufKhan . . . When using emp: Partial<Employee>, the resulting type contains all properties from Employee, but those properties will be nullable. (Well, undefinedable might be the more appropriate term here.) So all properties of emp are available, but nullable. When using emp: Nullable<Employee>, the emp variable itself is nullable. If it is not null, it should be a valid full Employee instance. You could combine those as well: emp: Nullable<Partial<Employee>>. In that case, emp is nullable itself, but when not null, its properties can all be nullable as well. – Bart Hofland Aug 12 at 6:06
41

Just add a question mark ? to the optional field.

interface Employee{
   id: number;
   name: string;
   salary?: number;
}
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  • 57
    As Ryan pointed out... ? means optional in typescript, not nullable. Without ? means the var must be set to a value including null or undefined. With ? you can skip the whole declaration-thingy. – He Nrik Apr 2 '15 at 11:09
  • 4
    Thank you! I googled for "typescript optional value" so this is exactly what I was looking for. – Fellow Stranger Oct 15 '19 at 14:38
14

You can just implement a user-defined type like the following:

type Nullable<T> = T | undefined | null;

var foo: Nullable<number> = 10; // ok
var bar: Nullable<number> = true; // type 'true' is not assignable to type 'Nullable<number>'
var baz: Nullable<number> = null; // ok

var arr1: Nullable<Array<number>> = [1,2]; // ok
var obj: Nullable<Object> = {}; // ok

 // Type 'number[]' is not assignable to type 'string[]'. 
 // Type 'number' is not assignable to type 'string'
var arr2: Nullable<Array<string>> = [1,2];
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12
type MyProps = {
  workoutType: string | null;
};
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4

i had this same question a while back.. all types in ts are nullable, because void is a subtype of all types (unlike, for example, scala).

see if this flowchart helps - https://github.com/bcherny/language-types-comparison#typescript

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  • 2
    -1: This is not true at all. As for void being 'subtype of all types' (bottom type), refer to this thread. Also the chart you provided for scala is incorrect as well. Nothing in scala is, in fact, the bottom type. Typescript, atm, does not have bottom type while scala does. – Daniel Shin Jul 25 '16 at 3:00
  • 2
    "Subtype of all types" != bottom type. See the TS spec here github.com/Microsoft/TypeScript/blob/master/doc/… – bcherny Jul 26 '16 at 0:06
3

Nullable type can invoke runtime error. So I think it's good to use a compiler option --strictNullChecks and declare number | null as type. also in case of nested function, although input type is null, compiler can not know what it could break, so I recommend use !(exclamination mark).

function broken(name: string | null): string {
  function postfix(epithet: string) {
    return name.charAt(0) + '.  the ' + epithet; // error, 'name' is possibly null
  }
  name = name || "Bob";
  return postfix("great");
}

function fixed(name: string | null): string {
  function postfix(epithet: string) {
    return name!.charAt(0) + '.  the ' + epithet; // ok
  }
  name = name || "Bob";
  return postfix("great");
}

Reference. https://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/advanced-types.html#type-guards-and-type-assertions

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