496

I have an interface in TypeScript.

interface Employee{
    id: number;
    name: string;
    salary: number;
}

I would like to make salary as a nullable field (Like we can do in C#). Is this possible to do in TypeScript?

0

14 Answers 14

432

All fields in JavaScript (and in TypeScript) can have the value null or undefined.

You can make the field optional which is different from nullable.

interface Employee1 {
    name: string;
    salary: number;
}

var a: Employee1 = { name: 'Bob', salary: 40000 }; // OK
var b: Employee1 = { name: 'Bob' }; // Not OK, you must have 'salary'
var c: Employee1 = { name: 'Bob', salary: undefined }; // OK
var d: Employee1 = { name: null, salary: undefined }; // OK

// OK
class SomeEmployeeA implements Employee1 {
    public name = 'Bob';
    public salary = 40000;
}

// Not OK: Must have 'salary'
class SomeEmployeeB implements Employee1 {
    public name: string;
}

Compare with:

interface Employee2 {
    name: string;
    salary?: number;
}

var a: Employee2 = { name: 'Bob', salary: 40000 }; // OK
var b: Employee2 = { name: 'Bob' }; // OK
var c: Employee2 = { name: 'Bob', salary: undefined }; // OK
var d: Employee2 = { name: null, salary: 'bob' }; // Not OK, salary must be a number

// OK, but doesn't make too much sense
class SomeEmployeeA implements Employee2 {
    public name = 'Bob';
}
10
  • 85
    Looks like strictly nullable types and strict null-checks have been implemented and will arrive with Typescript 2.0! (or typescript@next now.) Commented Jun 22, 2016 at 14:36
  • 29
    This is incorrect. JS distinguish between null and undefined. Correct code should be salary:number|null; If you do salary?:number; salary = null; You will get an error. However, salary = undefined; will work just fine in this case. Solution: use Union i.e. '|' Commented Apr 21, 2020 at 6:19
  • 11
    (Downvoting as it is now obsolete / not good practice.) Commented Oct 26, 2020 at 21:09
  • 1
    Huh why not | null. You say yourself that undefined isn't the same as null. Optional is undefined, so this doesn't the answer at all?
    – Trace
    Commented Aug 18, 2021 at 23:12
  • 1
    Properties don't allow null if "strictNullChecks": true is set (e.g. in the tsConfig.json).
    – kca
    Commented Jan 24 at 12:20
345

To be more C# like, define the Nullable type like this:

type Nullable<T> = T | null;

interface Employee{
   id: number;
   name: string;
   salary: Nullable<number>;
}

Bonus:

To make Nullable behave like a built in Typescript type, define it in a global.d.ts definition file in the root source folder. This path worked for me: /src/global.d.ts

5
  • 9
    Using this breaks the auto-completion of object properties. For example if we have emp: Partial<Employee>, we can do emp.id or emp.name etc but if we have emp: Nullable<Employee>, we can't do emp.id Commented Apr 17, 2020 at 14:04
  • 11
    @YousufKhan That is true. That's probably because since emp is potentially nullable, the id property might be invalid. To make the code robust, you should probably use an if block to check for null first, like this: if (emp) { console.log(emp.id); } If you use such an if-block, the TypeScript compiler and the editor "see" that the object inside the block is not null and thus will not generate errors and allow auto completion inside the if-block. (It works well in my Visual Studio 2019 editor and I assume it will work in Visual Studio Code too. But I don't know about other editors.) Commented Aug 12, 2020 at 5:57
  • 2
    @YousufKhan . . . When using emp: Partial<Employee>, the resulting type contains all properties from Employee, but those properties will be nullable. (Well, undefinedable might be the more appropriate term here.) So all properties of emp are available, but nullable. When using emp: Nullable<Employee>, the emp variable itself is nullable. If it is not null, it should be a valid full Employee instance. You could combine those as well: emp: Nullable<Partial<Employee>>. In that case, emp is nullable itself, but when not null, its properties can all be nullable as well. Commented Aug 12, 2020 at 6:06
  • Could you add Value and HasValue too like Nullable in C#? A generic class could probably be used but you will have to instantiate it too instead of just using a type declaration. Commented Jul 1, 2021 at 13:22
  • 1
    Maybe even type _Nullable<T> = T | null | undefined;? That's the vuefire definition
    – Boern
    Commented Feb 10, 2023 at 14:59
263

Union type is in my mind best option in this case:

interface Employee{
   id: number;
   name: string;
   salary: number | null;
}

// Both cases are valid
let employe1: Employee = { id: 1, name: 'John', salary: 100 };
let employe2: Employee = { id: 1, name: 'John', salary: null };

EDIT : For this to work as expected, you should enable the strictNullChecks in tsconfig.

3
  • 21
    If you use --strictNullChecks (which you should), this is a valid solution. I would not use it in favour of optional members, since it forces you to add an explicit null on all literal objects, but for function return values, it is the way to go.
    – geon
    Commented Nov 30, 2016 at 7:57
  • 1
    To clarify @geon's suggestion: an optional property of an interface is declared with a ? on the property name. salary?: number means that salary can be omitted, or equivalently given value undefined, but cannot give it value null. Good demonstration of different declarations using optional and/or null. Commented Oct 26, 2020 at 21:54
  • @ToolmakerSteve Yes. Using salary: number | null or salary: number | undefined is still great, because it forces you do set it to something, even if that something is undefined. It is easy to forget otherwise.
    – geon
    Commented Nov 12, 2020 at 16:51
74

Just add a question mark ? to the optional field.

interface Employee{
   id: number;
   name: string;
   salary?: number;
}
3
42

You can just implement a user-defined type like the following:

type Nullable<T> = T | undefined | null;

var foo: Nullable<number> = 10; // ok
var bar: Nullable<number> = true; // type 'true' is not assignable to type 'Nullable<number>'
var baz: Nullable<number> = null; // ok

var arr1: Nullable<Array<number>> = [1,2]; // ok
var obj: Nullable<Object> = {}; // ok

 // Type 'number[]' is not assignable to type 'string[]'. 
 // Type 'number' is not assignable to type 'string'
var arr2: Nullable<Array<string>> = [1,2];
1
  • 3
    This is dope, and imho should be part of TypeScript as a default!
    – Oddman
    Commented Feb 2, 2023 at 1:40
29
type MyProps = {
  workoutType: string | null;
};
24
type Nullable<T> = {
  [P in keyof T]: T[P] | null;
};

and then u can use it

Nullable<Employee>

This way you can still use Employee interface as it is somewhere else

10
type WithNullableFields<T, Fields> = {
  [K in keyof T]: K extends Fields 
    ? T[K] | null | undefined
    : T[K]
}

let employeeWithNullableSalary: WithNullableFields<Employee, "salary"> = {
  id: 1,
  name: "John",
  salary: null
}

Or you can turn off strictNullChecks ;)

And the reversed version:

type WithNonNullableFields<T, Fields> = {
  [K in keyof T]: K extends Fields
    ? NonNullable<T[K]>
    : T[K]
}
2
  • This is very useful and very undervoted answer. Commented Mar 13, 2023 at 16:50
  • Basically, this helper type allows to make specific "fields" as nullable. It gives flexibility if not all fields should become nullable.
    – hastrb
    Commented Feb 7 at 15:25
8

Nullable type can invoke runtime error. So I think it's good to use a compiler option --strictNullChecks and declare number | null as type. also in case of nested function, although input type is null, compiler can not know what it could break, so I recommend use !(exclamination mark).

function broken(name: string | null): string {
  function postfix(epithet: string) {
    return name.charAt(0) + '.  the ' + epithet; // error, 'name' is possibly null
  }
  name = name || "Bob";
  return postfix("great");
}

function fixed(name: string | null): string {
  function postfix(epithet: string) {
    return name!.charAt(0) + '.  the ' + epithet; // ok
  }
  name = name || "Bob";
  return postfix("great");
}

Reference. https://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/advanced-types.html#type-guards-and-type-assertions

1
  • 1
    Two comments: a) Modern JS or TS can use the "null-coalesce" operator ??. This is less likely to result in accidental errors than the "falsey" logical-OR operator ||. name = name ?? "Bob"; is cleaner way to replace null with a default value. b) I would not use ! in this code. Any time you use !, you make it possible that a future maintainer of code might make a mistake, resulting in a rare runtime error: painful to debug. Safer is const name2:string = name ?? "Bob"; function postfix(...) { return name2.charAt(0) ... Commented Oct 27, 2020 at 0:35
4

I solved this issue by editing the tsconfig.json file.

Under: "strict": true, add those 2 lines:

"noImplicitAny": false,
"strictNullChecks": false,
3
  • 8
    does this not defeat the purpose of typescript? surely there has to by a way to set an object property or object to some null safe state?
    – d0rf47
    Commented Nov 27, 2021 at 15:27
  • @d0rf47, I haven't tested it but I think you can use the NonNullable helper for that use case typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/…
    – gxc
    Commented Mar 2, 2022 at 17:59
  • I think this defeats the purpose of everything, haha, just kidding.
    – windmaomao
    Commented Oct 12, 2022 at 13:36
1

i had this same question a while back.. all types in ts are nullable, because void is a subtype of all types (unlike, for example, scala).

see if this flowchart helps - https://github.com/bcherny/language-types-comparison#typescript

2
  • 4
    -1: This is not true at all. As for void being 'subtype of all types' (bottom type), refer to this thread. Also the chart you provided for scala is incorrect as well. Nothing in scala is, in fact, the bottom type. Typescript, atm, does not have bottom type while scala does. Commented Jul 25, 2016 at 3:00
  • 3
    "Subtype of all types" != bottom type. See the TS spec here github.com/Microsoft/TypeScript/blob/master/doc/…
    – bcherny
    Commented Jul 26, 2016 at 0:06
1

Basing on previous answers, I'd like to add one more solution and explain it.

type Nullable<T> = T | null; 

type SetAllNullable<T, ExceptKeys = void> = {
    [P in keyof T]: P extends ExceptKeys
        ? T[P]
        : Nullable<T[P]>
};

For example we have type Person

type Person = {
  age: number;
  name: string;
  location: string;
}

and we want to set all fields to nullable except name. We can do it this way:

type PersonBrief = SetAllNullable<Person, 'name'>

As a result we'll have a new type where all fields except name can have null as value.

We can also provide a list of fields to be excluded from setting it to nullable. The simple ways is

type PersonBriefOne = SetAllNullable<Person, 'name' | 'age'>;

and a bit more complex is

// `as const` makes this constant read-only and safe for making a type
const excludeFiledsList = ['name', 'age'] as const;

// this tricky string takes all array values by index and creates union type
type ExludedFieldsType = typeof excludeFiledsList[number];

type PersonBriefTwo = SetAllNullable<Person, ExludedFieldsType>;

So types PersonBriefOne and PersonBriefTwo will be similar.

One more note is that ExceptKeys value is optional and can be skipped - in this case all fields will be set to nullable, and even if non-existing key(s) will be provided as second argument, it will not cause any error and all fields will be set to nullable as well.

1

Can define property as Partial and Nullable with type:

export type PartialNullable<T> = {
  [P in keyof T]?: T[P] | null;
};

Them just use

interface Employee {
  id: number;
  company_id: number;
  name: string;
  age: number;
};

const EmployeeData: PartialNullable<Employee> = {
    age: null,
    name: null
};
0

You can define a Nullable like type like the following:

type NullOrUndefinedOr<T> = T extends void ? never : null | undefined | T;

This is an example of how it would look:

/* "fictitious" src/services/product.ts */

import { Product } from "@/models/product";
import { ProductRepository } from "@/repositories/product";
import { Logger } from "@/telemetry";

const log = Logger.create(__filename);

export async function getProductById(id: int): Promise<NullOrUndefinedOr<Product>> {
  try{
    const repo = await ProductRepository.create(process.env.DB_CONN_STRING);
    return await repo.findOne({ productId: id });
  }catch(err){
    log.exception(err);
    return null;
  }
}

Note: You can also add this type to your src/types/global.d.ts to used it anywhere in your project without having to import it.

/* global.d.ts */

declare global {
  type NullOrUndefinedOr<T> = T extends void ? never : null | undefined | T;
  
  /** define all global types you need **/
}

/**
if you don't import or export anything else in this file
ensure to export at least an empty object to avoid the
compiler skipping this file
**/
export {};

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