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I have the below recursive function to compute factorial of a number. The program works fine except when I remove the if condition. Can someone explain why?

This is the code that works fine --

public static long factUsingRecursion(int number) {
    if (number == 1) {
        return 1;
    } else {
        return number * factUsingRecursion(number - 1);
    }
}

Without the if condition (Code that throws the error),

public static long factUsingRecursion(int number) {
    return number * factUsingRecursion(number - 1);
}

I get the stack overflow error.

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.StackOverflowError at birst.FactorialUsingRecursion.factUsingRecursion(FactorialUsingRecursion.java:10)

Request experts to please advise me why this is the case?

  • 8
    Hint: Without the if -- how do you decide when to stop? – cpt. jazz Jun 20 '13 at 21:05
  • 1
    Any recursion should always have a base condition to end the recursion. That if condition is for base condition only. Else it will become an infinite recursion. – Rohit Jain Jun 20 '13 at 21:07
  • longs are not limited to positive numbers. Computers will do whatever you tell them to do....so it's not like the function will magically stop once number equals 1. Without the if statement, you are pushing function after function onto the stack without a chance for any of the statements to ever return and end the recursion. number will head towards negative infinity until the stack overflows – mistahenry Jun 20 '13 at 21:10
  • You can only choose one "accepted answer" in a question. – rgettman Jun 20 '13 at 21:22
1

It loses one of the things that makes a recursive function recursive in that it has no exit condition.

All recursive solutions must satisfy three rules or properties: A recursive solution must contain a base case. A recursive solution must contain a recursive case. A recursive solution must make progress toward the base case.

From: Data Structures and Algorithms Using Python

| improve this answer | |
7

In recursion, there must always be a base case that stops the recursion. Without the if, you have no base case and nothing stops it. Eventually too many method calls are on the stack and a StackOverflowError results.

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2

This line causing number variable to be decreased by 1

return number * factUsingRecursion(number - 1);

and it will handle all values of number except when it is 1

so this line of code is a break condition

if (number == 1) {
        return 1;

}

and it prevent you to avoid stackoverflow exception

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2

Recursion requires a base case. Without it, it will continue calling the function over and over and never stop. The if statement is the base case, which terminates the recursion. That is why if you remove it, you get a StackOverflowError.

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2

Imagine what happens when you call:

factUsingRecursion(3);

With the if:

3*factUsingRecursion(2)
3*2*factUsingRecursion(1)
3*2*1

Without the if:

3*factUsingRecursion(2)
3*2*factUsingRecursion(1)
3*2*1*factUsingRecursion(0)
3*2*1*0*factUsingRecursion(-1)
3*2*1*0*-1*factUsingRecursion(-2)
3*2*1*0*-1*-2*factUsingRecursion(-3)
...
And so on... It will not stop until you encounter the StackOverflow error
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  • Thanks so much. Its very clear now. Appreciate your quick response! – user2341013 Jun 20 '13 at 21:20
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    @user2341013 You're welcome. btw, on StackOverflow you can only accept (the green checkmark) one answer, so pick the one the helped you the most. You can upvote (the up arrow) as many answers as you like. – Paul Jun 20 '13 at 21:24
  • Sure, I got it. Thank you. In this case though, all the answers helped me ;) – user2341013 Jun 20 '13 at 21:25
1

The program will no longer work when you remove the if condition because you will just be left with return number * factUsingRecursion(number - 1); and the factUsingRecursion(number - 1) here would have the same return calling return number * factUsingRecursion(number - 1);. Your function constantly calls itself, never able to evaluate to anything. By setting the condition, you function is able to evaluate to a definitive value at some point in the recursive chain, and the first call can evaluate.

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0

For every integer i, you are calling the function with i -1. Integersa are infinite, so you would never stop calling the function. eg: -1000 would call -1001 and this would keep going as long as JVM has some space in it's stack.

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