5

Below is a quick outline of what I'm trying to do. I want to push a record to two different tables in the database from one method call. If anything fails, I want everything to roll back. So if insertIntoB fails, I want anything that would be committed in insertIntoA to be rolled back.

public class Service {
    MyDAO dao;

    public void insertRecords(List<Record> records){
        for (Record record : records){
            insertIntoAAndB(record);
        }
    }

    @Transactional (rollbackFor = Exception.class, propagation = Propagation.REQUIRES_NEW)
    public void insertIntoAAndB(Record record){
        insertIntoA(record);
        insertIntoB(record);
    }

    @Transactional(propagation = Propagation.REQUIRED)
    public void insertIntoA(Record record){
        dao.insertIntoA(record);
    }

    @Transactional(propagation = Propagation.REQUIRED)
    public void insertIntoB(Record record){
        dao.insertIntoB(record);
    }

    public void setMyDAO(final MyDAO dao) {
        this.dao = dao;
    }
}

Where MyDAO dao is an interface that is mapped to the database using mybatis and is set using Spring injections.

Right now if insertIntoB fails, everything from insertIntoA still gets pushed to the database. How can I correct this behavior?

EDIT:

I modified the class to give a more accurate description of what I'm trying to achieve. If I run insertIntoAAndB directly, the roll back works if there are any issues, but if I call insertIntoAAndB from insertRecords, the roll back doesn't work if any issues arise.

13
0

I found the solution!

Apparently Spring can't intercept internal method calls to transactional methods. So I took out the method calling the transactional method, and put it into a separate class, and the rollback works just fine. Below is a rough example of the fix.

public class Foo {
    public void insertRecords(List<Record> records){
        Service myService = new Service();
        for (Record record : records){
            myService.insertIntoAAndB(record);
        }
    }
}

public class Service {
    MyDAO dao;

    @Transactional (rollbackFor = Exception.class, propagation = Propagation.REQUIRES_NEW)
    public void insertIntoAAndB(Record record){
        insertIntoA(record);
        insertIntoB(record);
    }

    @Transactional(propagation = Propagation.REQUIRED)
    public void insertIntoA(Record record){
        dao.insertIntoA(record);
    }

    @Transactional(propagation = Propagation.REQUIRED)
    public void insertIntoB(Record record){
        dao.insertIntoB(record);
    }

    public void setMyDAO(final MyDAO dao) {
        this.dao = dao;
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Also see this: stackoverflow.com/questions/4396284/…; Spring can intercept method callings from same class (and @Transcational also works on private methods) if you use AspectJ instead of Spring proxy – krisy Oct 28 '15 at 13:25
2
0

I think the behavior you encounter is dependent on what ORM / persistence provider and database you're using. I tested your case using hibernate & mysql and all my transactions rolled back alright.

If you do use hibernate enable SQL and transaction logging to see what it's doing:

log4j.logger.org.hibernate.SQL=DEBUG
log4j.logger.org.hibernate.transaction=DEBUG
// for hibernate 4.2.2 
// log4j.logger.org.hibernate.engine.transaction=DEBUG

If you're on plain jdbc (using spring JdbcTemplate), you can also debug SQL & transaction on Spring level

log4j.logger.org.springframework.jdbc.core=DEBUG
log4j.logger.org.springframework.transaction=DEBUG

Double check your autocommit settings and database specific peciular (eg: most DDL will be comitted right away, you won't be able to roll it back although spring/hibernate did so)

| improve this answer | |
  • Please post your spring configuration. – Nicholas Jun 21 '13 at 1:22
  • 1
    @gerrytan I edited my question to more accurately portray what I'm doing. – Franklin Jun 21 '13 at 15:29
0
0

Just because jdk parses aop annotation not only with the method, also parse annotation with the target class. For example, you have method A with @transactional, and method B which calls method A but without @transactional, When you invoke the method B with reflection, Spring AOP will check the B method with the target class has any annotations. So if your calling method in this class is not with the @transactional, it will not parse any other method in this method. At last, show you the source code: org.springframework.aop.framework.jdkDynamicAopProxy.class

public Object invoke(Object proxy, Method method, Object[] args) throws Throwable {
    ......
    // Get the interception chain for this method.
    List<Object> chain = this.advised.getInterceptorsAndDynamicInterceptionAdvice(method, targetClass);

    // Check whether we have any advice. If we don't, we can fallback on direct
    // reflective invocation of the target, and avoid creating a MethodInvocation.
    if (chain.isEmpty()) {
    // We can skip creating a MethodInvocation: just invoke the target directly
    // Note that the final invoker must be an InvokerInterceptor so we know it does
    // nothing but a reflective operation on the target, and no hot swapping orfancy proxying.
        retVal = AopUtils.invokeJoinpointUsingReflection(target, method, args);
    }
    else {
    // We need to create a method invocation...
        invocation = new ReflectiveMethodInvocation(proxy, target, method, args, targetClass, chain);
    // Proceed to the joinpoint through the interceptor chain.
    retVal = invocation.proceed();
    }
}
| improve this answer | |

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