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I'm working through the excellent tutorials at arcsynthesis while building a graphics engine and have discovered I don't understand VAOs as much as I thought I had.

From the tutorial Chapter 5. Objects In Depth

Buffer Binding and Attribute Association

You may notice that glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER) is not on that list, even though it is part of the attribute setup for rendering. The binding to GL_ARRAY_BUFFER is not part of a VAO because the association between a buffer object and a vertex attribute does not happen when you call glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER). This association happens when you call glVertexAttribPointer.

When you call glVertexAttribPointer, OpenGL takes whatever buffer is at the moment of this call bound to GL_ARRAY_BUFFER and associates it with the given vertex attribute. Think of the GL_ARRAY_BUFFER binding as a global pointer that glVertexAttribPointer reads. So you are free to bind whatever you want or nothing at all to GL_ARRAY_BUFFER after making a glVertexAttribPointer call; it will affect nothing in the final rendering. So VAOs do store which buffer objects are associated with which attributes; but they do not store the GL_ARRAY_BUFFER binding itself.

I initially missed the last line "...but they do not store the GL_ARRAY_BUFFER binding itself". Before I noticed this line I thought that the currently bound buffer was saved once glVertexAttribPointer was called. Missing this knowledge, I built a mesh class and was able to get a scene with a number of meshes rendering properly.

A portion of that code is listed below. Note that I do not call glBindBuffer in the draw function.

// MESH RENDERING

/* ...            */
/* SETUP FUNCTION */
/* ...            */

// Setup vertex array object
glGenVertexArrays(1, &_vertex_array_object_id);
glBindVertexArray(_vertex_array_object_id);

// Setup vertex buffers  
glGenBuffers(1, &_vertex_buffer_object_id);
glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, _vertex_buffer_object_id);
glBufferData(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, _vertices.size() * sizeof(vertex), &_vertices[0], GL_STATIC_DRAW);

// Setup vertex attributes
glEnableVertexAttribArray(e_aid_position);
glEnableVertexAttribArray(e_aid_normal);
glEnableVertexAttribArray(e_aid_color);
glEnableVertexAttribArray(e_aid_tex);

glVertexAttribPointer(e_aid_position, 3, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, sizeof(vertex), (GLvoid*)offsetof(vertex, pos));
glVertexAttribPointer(e_aid_normal,   3, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, sizeof(vertex), (GLvoid*)offsetof(vertex, norm));
glVertexAttribPointer(e_aid_color,    4, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, sizeof(vertex), (GLvoid*)offsetof(vertex, col));
glVertexAttribPointer(e_aid_tex,      2, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, sizeof(vertex), (GLvoid*)offsetof(vertex, tex));  

/* ...           */
/* DRAW FUNCTION */
/* ...           */

glBindVertexArray(_vertex_array_object_id);  
glDrawArrays(GL_TRIANGLES, 0, _vertices.size());

Now that I'm about to start lighting I wanted to get some debug drawing up so I could verify all my normals are correct. Currently I just store all lines to be rendered for a frame in a vector. Since this data will likely change every frame, I'm using GL_DYNAMIC_DRAW and specify the data right before I render it.

Initially when I did this I would get garbage lines that would just point off into infinity. The offending code is below:

// DEBUG DRAW LINE RENDERING 

/* ...            */
/* SETUP FUNCTION */
/* ...            */

// Setup vertex array object
glGenVertexArrays(1, &_vertex_array_object_id);
glBindVertexArray(_vertex_array_object_id);

// Setup vertex buffers  
glGenBuffers(1, &_vertex_buffer_object_id);
glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, _vertex_buffer_object_id);
  // Note: no buffer data supplied here!!!

// Setup vertex attributes
glEnableVertexAttribArray(e_aid_position);
glEnableVertexAttribArray(e_aid_color);

glVertexAttribPointer(e_aid_position, 3, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, sizeof(line_vertex), (GLvoid*)offsetof(line_vertex, pos));
glVertexAttribPointer(e_aid_color,    4, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, sizeof(line_vertex), (GLvoid*)offsetof(line_vertex, col));

/* ...           */
/* DRAW FUNCTION */
/* ...           */

glBindVertexArray(_vertex_array_object_id);
  // Specifying buffer data here instead!!!
glBufferData(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, _line_vertices.size() * sizeof(line_vertex), &_line_vertices[0], GL_DYNAMIC_DRAW);
glDrawArrays(GL_LINES, 0, _line_vertices.size());

After a bit of hunting, as well as finding the detail I missed above, I found that if I call glBindBuffer before glBufferData in the draw function, everything works out fine.

I'm confused as to why my mesh rendering worked in the first place given this. Do I only need to call glBindBuffer again if I change the data in the buffer? Or is behavior undefined if you don't bind the buffer and I was just unlucky and had it work?

Note that I am targeting OpenGL version 3.0.

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Do I only need to call glBindBuffer again if I change the data in the buffer?

Yes, The VAO object remembers which buffers were bound each time you called glVertexAttribPointer whilst that VAO was bound, so you don't usually need to call glBindBuffer again. If you want to change the data in the buffer however, OpenGL needs to know which buffer you are changing, so you need to call glBindBuffer before calling glBufferData. It is irrelevant which VAO object is bound at this point.

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    Ok, that makes more sense. I have one minor detail that I'm still a little fuzzy on. Let's say I call glBindVertexArray with VAO 1 which remembers VBO 1 was bound when glVertexAttribPointer was called.Then I call glBindBuffer with VBO 2, followed by glDrawArrays. Which buffer should be used, VBO 1 or VBO 2? I don't believe this is something that one would normally do, I just want to make sure I understand what's going on. – Peter Clark Jun 21 '13 at 17:45
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    VBO 1 will be used. Note that this is true whether or not you are using VAOs. Also you might have bound several VBOs whilst you had the VAO bound (perhaps a different one for each attribute). Once you have called glVertexAttribPointer the buffer bound at that time is the one which will be used. – GuyRT Jun 21 '13 at 18:07
  • 1
    Awesome, that's good to know! Thanks a ton for the clarification! – Peter Clark Jun 21 '13 at 18:11

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