15

I want to build a webservice with this signature, which does not throw an exception if param2 is left empty. Is this possible?

[WebMethod]
public string HelloWorld(string param1, bool param2) { }

The exception is a System.ArgumentException that is thrown when trying to convert the empty string to boolean.

Ideas that have not worked so far:

  • method overloading is not allowed for webservices, like

    public string HelloWorld(string param1)
    {
        return HelloWorld(param1, false);
    }
    

as suggested here:

  • make bool nullable bool?. Same exception.
  • manipulate the WSDL, see this answer

My question is related to this question, but the only answer points to WCF contracts, which I have not used yet.

13

You can have a Overloaded Method in webservices with MessageName attribute. This is a workaround to achieve the overloading functionality.

Look at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/byxd99hx%28VS.71%29.aspx

[WebMethod(MessageName="Add3")]
public double Add(double dValueOne, double dValueTwo, double dValueThree)
{
   return dValueOne + dValueTwo + dValueThree;
}

[WebMethod(MessageName="Add2")]
public int Add(double dValueOne, double dValueTwo)
{
   return dValueOne + dValueTwo;
}

The methods will be made visible as Add2 and Add3to the outside.

  • Will both methods look like the same one to the outside world? – Hauke Nov 13 '09 at 9:15
  • 1
    Hauke, No, It will two different methods to outside world. This is a workaround for Overloading. – Rasik Jain Nov 13 '09 at 15:08
12

If you REALLY have to accomplish this, here's a sort of hack for the specific case of a web method that has only primitive types as parameters:

[WebMethod]
public void MyMethod(double requiredParam1, int requiredParam2)
{
    // Grab an optional param from the request.
    string optionalParam1 = this.Context.Request["optionalParam1"];

    // Grab another optional param from the request, this time a double.
    double optionalParam2;
    double.TryParse(this.Context.Request["optionalParam2"], out optionalParam2);
    ...
}
  • not work! this.Context.Request["optionalParam1"] always returns null – Hiep Dec 30 '15 at 9:31
7

I know this post is little old. But I think the method names should be same for the example from Rasik.If both method names are same, then where overloading comes there. I think it should be like this..

[WebMethod(MessageName="Add3")]
**public double Add(double dValueOne, double dValueTwo, double dValueThree)**
{
   return dValueOne + dValueTwo + dValueThree;
}

[WebMethod(MessageName="Add2")]
**public int Add(double dValueOne, double dValueTwo)**
{
   return dValueOne + dValueTwo;
}
  • Yes I was wondering about that too - otherwise why bother with different method names. I shall propose this as an edit to his answer. – Carlos P Jan 3 '13 at 17:32
1

You can not have overloaded Web Service methods. The SOAP protocol does not support it. Rasik's code is the workaround.

1

Make all optional arguments strings. If no argument is passed, the input is treated as null.

  • This works (if parameter was missing from the calling side it comes as Nothing). Tnx ! – Lucius May 7 '19 at 13:21
0

In accordance with MinOccurs Attribute Binding Support and Default Attribute Binding Support:

  1. Value type accompanied by a public bool field that uses the Specified naming convention described previously under Translating XSD to source - minOccurs value of output <element> element 0.

    [WebMethod]
    public SomeResult SomeMethod(bool optionalParam, [XmlIgnore] bool optionalParamSpecified)
    result:
    <s:element minOccurs="0" maxOccurs="1" name="optionalParam" type="s:boolean" />

  2. Value type with a default value specified via a System.Component.DefaultValueAttribute - minOccurs value of output <element> element 0. In the <element> element, the default value is also specified via the default XML attribute.

    [WebMethod]
    public SomeResult SomeMethod([DefaultValue(true)] bool optionalParam)
    result:
    <s:element minOccurs="0" maxOccurs="1" default="true" name="optionalParam" type="s:boolean" />

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