141

Let A and B be two sets. I'm looking for really fast or elegant ways to compute the set difference (A - B or A \B, depending on your preference) between them. The two sets are stored and manipulated as Javascript arrays, as the title says.

Notes:

  • Gecko-specific tricks are okay
  • I'd prefer sticking to native functions (but I am open to a lightweight library if it's way faster)
  • I've seen, but not tested, JS.Set (see previous point)

Edit: I noticed a comment about sets containing duplicate elements. When I say "set" I'm referring to the mathematical definition, which means (among other things) that they do not contain duplicate elements.

9
  • What is this "set difference" terminology you are using? Is that from C++ or something? Nov 12 '09 at 15:44
  • What are in your sets? Depending on the type you are targetting (eg Numbers), computing a set difference can be done really fast and elegant. If your sets contain (say) DOM elements, you're going to be stuck with a slow indexOf implementation. Nov 12 '09 at 15:53
  • @Crescent: my sets contain numbers - sorry for not specifying. @Josh: it's the standard set operation in mathematics (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Set_%28mathematics%29#Complements)
    – Matt Ball
    Nov 12 '09 at 16:30
  • @JoshStodola that's the mathematical notation for set difference
    – Pat
    Aug 12 '14 at 0:21
  • 1
    @MattBall Nope, I saw that. But Josh's question was valid and unanswered so I answered it :)
    – Pat
    Aug 14 '14 at 21:19

12 Answers 12

205

if don't know if this is most effective, but perhaps the shortest

A = [1, 2, 3, 4];
B = [1, 3, 4, 7];

diff = A.filter(function(x) { return B.indexOf(x) < 0 })

console.log(diff);

Updated to ES6:

A = [1, 2, 3, 4];
B = [1, 3, 4, 7];

diff = A.filter(x => !B.includes(x) );

console.log(diff);
12
  • 10
    +1: not the most efficient solution, but definitely short and readable
    – Christoph
    Nov 12 '09 at 17:37
  • 10
    Note: array.filter is not supported cross-browser (e.g. not in IE). It seems not to matter to @Matt since he stated that "Gecko-specific tricks are okay" but I think it's worth mentioning. Nov 13 '09 at 16:44
  • 55
    This is very slow. O(|A| * |B|)
    – glebm
    Apr 8 '13 at 0:37
  • 1
    @EricBréchemier This is now supported (since IE 9). Array.prototype.filter is a standard ECMAScript feature. Jun 21 '16 at 8:14
  • 5
    In ES6, you could use !B.includes(x) instead of B.indexOf(x) < 0 :)
    – c24w
    Jun 26 '17 at 11:27
133

Well, 7 years later, with ES6's Set object it's quite easy (but still not as compact as python's A - B), and reportedly faster than indexOf for large arrays:

console.clear();
let a = new Set([1, 2, 3, 4]);
let b = new Set([5, 4, 3, 2]);


let a_minus_b = new Set([...a].filter(x => !b.has(x)));
let b_minus_a = new Set([...b].filter(x => !a.has(x)));
let a_intersect_b = new Set([...a].filter(x => b.has(x))); 

console.log([...a_minus_b]) // {1}
console.log([...b_minus_a]) // {5}
console.log([...a_intersect_b]) // {2,3,4}

5
  • 2
    Also considerably faster than indexOf for large arrays. Sep 14 '16 at 6:34
  • 181
    Why JavaScript sets don't have union/intersect/difference built in is beyond me... Nov 27 '16 at 4:50
  • 10
    I completely agree; these should be lower level primitives implemented in the js engine. It's beyond me also...
    – Rafael
    Jan 6 '17 at 19:37
  • 5
    @SwiftsNamesake There's a proposal for set built-in methods that will hopefully be talked about in Janurary 2018 github.com/tc39/agendas/blob/master/2018/01.md.
    – John
    Jan 23 '18 at 6:07
  • Because it is JavaScript
    – tom10271
    Oct 7 '20 at 2:29
15

You can use an object as a map to avoid linearly scanning B for each element of A as in user187291's answer:

function setMinus(A, B) {
    var map = {}, C = [];

    for(var i = B.length; i--; )
        map[B[i].toSource()] = null; // any other value would do

    for(var i = A.length; i--; ) {
        if(!map.hasOwnProperty(A[i].toSource()))
            C.push(A[i]);
    }

    return C;
}

The non-standard toSource() method is used to get unique property names; if all elements already have unique string representations (as is the case with numbers), you can speed up the code by dropping the toSource() invocations.

12

Looking at a lof of these solutions, they do fine for small cases. But, when you blow them up to a million items, the time complexity starts getting silly.

 A.filter(v => B.includes(v))

That starts looking like an O(N^2) solution. Since there is an O(N) solution, let's use it, you can easily modify to not be a generator if you're not up to date on your JS runtime.

    function *setMinus(A, B) {
      const setA = new Set(A);
      const setB = new Set(B);

      for (const v of setB.values()) {
        if (!setA.delete(v)) {
            yield v;
        }
      }

      for (const v of setA.values()) {
        yield v;
      }
    }

    a = [1,2,3];
    b = [2,3,4];

    console.log(Array.from(setMinus(a, b)));

While this is a bit more complex than many of the other solutions, when you have large lists this will be far faster.

Let's take a quick look at the performance difference, running it on a set of 1,000,000 random integers between 0...10,000 we see the following performance results.

setMinus time =  181 ms
    diff time =  19099 ms

function buildList(count, range) {
  result = [];
  for (i = 0; i < count; i++) {
    result.push(Math.floor(Math.random() * range))
  }
  return result;
}

function *setMinus(A, B) {
  const setA = new Set(A);
  const setB = new Set(B);

  for (const v of setB.values()) {
    if (!setA.delete(v)) {
        yield v;
    }
  }

  for (const v of setA.values()) {
    yield v;
  }
}

function doDiff(A, B) {
  return A.filter(function(x) { return B.indexOf(x) < 0 })
}

const listA = buildList(100_000, 100_000_000); 
const listB = buildList(100_000, 100_000_000); 

let t0 = process.hrtime.bigint()

const _x = Array.from(setMinus(listA, listB))

let t1 = process.hrtime.bigint()

const _y = doDiff(listA, listB)

let t2 = process.hrtime.bigint()

console.log("setMinus time = ", (t1 - t0) / 1_000_000n, "ms");
console.log("diff time = ", (t2 - t1) / 1_000_000n, "ms");

1
  • @RonKlein fair point, updated the code to be two sets
    – koblas
    Sep 6 '21 at 10:44
9

The shortest, using jQuery, is:

var A = [1, 2, 3, 4];
var B = [1, 3, 4, 7];

var diff = $(A).not(B);

console.log(diff.toArray());
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

5
  • This returns an object of the difference.
    – Drew Baker
    Sep 10 '15 at 18:31
  • 2
    jQuery not no longer works with generic objects as of 3.0.0-rc1. See github.com/jquery/jquery/issues/3147 Jun 9 '16 at 15:38
  • 3
    It's not a great idea to add a dependency on a ~70k 3rd party library just to do this, since the same thing can be accomplished in just a few lines of code as shown in the other answers here. However, if you are already using jQuery on your project this will work just fine. Dec 5 '16 at 14:24
  • Though this approach has less code, but it does not provide any explanation of the space and time complexity of the the differ algorithms and the data structure it uses to perform the method. It is black boxed for developers to engineer the software with no evaluation when data scale up or with limited memory is allowed. if you use such approach with large data set, the performance might remains unknown until further research onto the source code. Jan 18 '17 at 3:24
  • This is just returning the amount (2 in this case) of elements of A which are not in B. Converting 2 into array is pointless...
    – Alex
    Mar 2 '18 at 12:29
7

If you're using Sets, it can be quite simple and performant:

function setDifference(a, b) {
  return new Set(Array.from(a).filter(item => !b.has(item)));
}

Since Sets use Hash functions* under the hood, the has function is much faster than indexOf (this matters if you have, say, more than 100 items).

0
6

I would hash the array B, then keep values from the array A not present in B:

function getHash(array){
  // Hash an array into a set of properties
  //
  // params:
  //   array - (array) (!nil) the array to hash
  //
  // return: (object)
  //   hash object with one property set to true for each value in the array

  var hash = {};
  for (var i=0; i<array.length; i++){
    hash[ array[i] ] = true;
  }
  return hash;
}

function getDifference(a, b){
  // compute the difference a\b
  //
  // params:
  //   a - (array) (!nil) first array as a set of values (no duplicates)
  //   b - (array) (!nil) second array as a set of values (no duplicates)
  //
  // return: (array)
  //   the set of values (no duplicates) in array a and not in b, 
  //   listed in the same order as in array a.

  var hash = getHash(b);
  var diff = [];
  for (var i=0; i<a.length; i++){
    var value = a[i];
    if ( !hash[value]){
      diff.push(value);
    }
  }
  return diff;
}
3
  • that's exactly the same algorithm I posted half an hour ago
    – Christoph
    Nov 12 '09 at 17:15
  • @Christoph: you are right... I failed to notice that. I find my implementation more simple to understand though :) Nov 13 '09 at 16:41
  • I think it is better to compute the diff outside of getDifference so it may be reused multiple times. Maybe optional like so: getDifference(a, b, hashOfB), if not passed it will be computed otherwise it is reused as-is. Apr 12 '17 at 11:54
5

Incorporating the idea from Christoph and assuming a couple of non-standard iteration methods on arrays and objects/hashes (each and friends), we can get set difference, union and intersection in linear time in about 20 lines total:

var setOPs = {
  minusAB : function (a, b) {
    var h = {};
    b.each(function (v) { h[v] = true; });
    return a.filter(function (v) { return !h.hasOwnProperty(v); });
  },
  unionAB : function (a, b) {
    var h = {}, f = function (v) { h[v] = true; };
    a.each(f);
    b.each(f);
    return myUtils.keys(h);
  },
  intersectAB : function (a, b) {
    var h = {};
    a.each(function (v) { h[v] = 1; });
    b.each(function (v) { h[v] = (h[v] || 0) + 1; });
    var fnSel = function (v, count) { return count > 1; };
    var fnVal = function (v, c) { return v; };
    return myUtils.select(h, fnSel, fnVal);
  }
};

This assumes that each and filter are defined for arrays, and that we have two utility methods:

  • myUtils.keys(hash): returns an array with the keys of the hash

  • myUtils.select(hash, fnSelector, fnEvaluator): returns an array with the results of calling fnEvaluator on the key/value pairs for which fnSelector returns true.

The select() is loosely inspired by Common Lisp, and is merely filter() and map() rolled into one. (It would be better to have them defined on Object.prototype, but doing so wrecks havoc with jQuery, so I settled for static utility methods.)

Performance: Testing with

var a = [], b = [];
for (var i = 100000; i--; ) {
  if (i % 2 !== 0) a.push(i);
  if (i % 3 !== 0) b.push(i);
}

gives two sets with 50,000 and 66,666 elements. With these values A-B takes about 75ms, while union and intersection are about 150ms each. (Mac Safari 4.0, using Javascript Date for timing.)

I think that's decent payoff for 20 lines of code.

2
  • 1
    you should still check hasOwnProperty() even if the elements are numeric: otherwise, something like Object.prototype[42] = true; means 42 can never occur in the result set
    – Christoph
    Nov 12 '09 at 17:31
  • Granted that it would be possible to set 42 in that way, but is there a semi-realistic use case where anyone would actually do so? But for general strings I take the point - it could easily conflict with some Object.prototype variable or function. Nov 12 '09 at 18:54
5

Using Underscore.js (Library for functional JS)

>>> var foo = [1,2,3]
>>> var bar = [1,2,4]
>>> _.difference(foo, bar);
[4]
5

Some simple functions, borrowing from @milan's answer:

const setDifference = (a, b) => new Set([...a].filter(x => !b.has(x)));
const setIntersection = (a, b) => new Set([...a].filter(x => b.has(x)));
const setUnion = (a, b) => new Set([...a, ...b]);

Usage:

const a = new Set([1, 2]);
const b = new Set([2, 3]);

setDifference(a, b); // Set { 1 }
setIntersection(a, b); // Set { 2 }
setUnion(a, b); // Set { 1, 2, 3 }
4

As for the fasted way, this isn't so elegant but I've run some tests to be sure. Loading one array as an object is far faster to process in large quantities:

var t, a, b, c, objA;

    // Fill some arrays to compare
a = Array(30000).fill(0).map(function(v,i) {
    return i.toFixed();
});
b = Array(20000).fill(0).map(function(v,i) {
    return (i*2).toFixed();
});

    // Simple indexOf inside filter
t = Date.now();
c = b.filter(function(v) { return a.indexOf(v) < 0; });
console.log('completed indexOf in %j ms with result %j length', Date.now() - t, c.length);

    // Load `a` as Object `A` first to avoid indexOf in filter
t = Date.now();
objA = {};
a.forEach(function(v) { objA[v] = true; });
c = b.filter(function(v) { return !objA[v]; });
console.log('completed Object in %j ms with result %j length', Date.now() - t, c.length);

Results:

completed indexOf in 1219 ms with result 5000 length
completed Object in 8 ms with result 5000 length

However, this works with strings only. If you plan to compare numbered sets you'll want to map results with parseFloat.

2
  • 1
    Shouldn't it be c = b.filter(function(v) { return !A[v]; }); in the second function? May 29 '19 at 3:32
  • You are correct. Somehow it appears to be even faster for me
    – SmujMaiku
    May 30 '19 at 12:26
1

This works, but I think another one is much more shorter, and elegant too

A = [1, 'a', 'b', 12];
B = ['a', 3, 4, 'b'];

diff_set = {
    ar : {},
    diff : Array(),
    remove_set : function(a) { ar = a; return this; },
    remove: function (el) {
        if(ar.indexOf(el)<0) this.diff.push(el);
    }
}

A.forEach(diff_set.remove_set(B).remove,diff_set);
C = diff_set.diff;

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