I have got a page layout with two controllers at the same time, one holds the data displayed as kind of side navigation, based on data stored the browsers local storage and at least one other controller, which is bind to a route and view.

I created this little wire frame graphic below which show the page layout:

Example image two controllers

The second controller is used for manipulating the local stored data and performs actions like adding a new item or deleting an existing one. My goal is to keep the data in sync, if an item got added or deleted by the 'ManageListCrtl' the side navigation using the 'ListCtrl' should get updated immediately.

I archived this by separating the local storage logic into a service which performs a broadcast when the list got manipulated, each controller listens on this event and updates the scope's list.

This works fine, but I'm not sure if there is the best practice.

Here is a stripped down version of my code containing just the necessary parts:

angular.module('StoredListExample', ['LocalObjectStorage'])
    .service('StoredList', function ($rootScope, LocalObjectStorage) {
        this.add = function (url, title) {
            // local storage add logic

            $rootScope.$broadcast('StoredList', list);
        };

        this.delete = function (id) {
            // local storage delete logic

            $rootScope.$broadcast('StoredList', list);
        };

        this.get = function () {
            // local storage get logic
        };
    });

angular.module('StoredListExample')
    .controller('ListCtrl', function ($scope, StoredList) {
        $scope.list = StoredList.get();

        $scope.$on('StoredList', function (event, data) {
            $scope.list = data;
        });
    });

angular.module('StoredListExample')
    .controller('ManageListCtrl', function ($scope, $location, StoredList) {
        $scope.list = StoredList.get();

        $scope.add = function () {
            StoredList.add($scope.url, $scope.title);
            $location.path('/manage');
        };

        $scope.delete = function (id) {
            StoredList.delete(id);
        };

        $scope.$on('StoredList', function (event, data) {
            $scope.list = data;
        });
    });
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't see anything wrong with doing it this way. Your other option of course is to just inject $rootScope into both controllers and pub/sub between them with a $rootScope.$broadcast and a $rootScope.$on.

angular.module('StoredListExample')
.controller('ListCtrl', function ($scope, $rootScope) {
    $scope.list = [];

    $rootScope.$on('StoredList', function (event, data) {
        $scope.list = data;
    });
});

angular.module('StoredListExample')
.controller('ManageListCtrl', function ($scope, $rootScope, $location) {
    $scope.list = [];

    $scope.add = function () {
        //psuedo, not sure if this is what you'd be doing...
        $scope.list.push({ url: $scope.url, title: $scope.title});
        $scope.storedListUpdated();
        $location.path('/manage');
    };

    $scope.delete = function (id) {
        var index = $scope.list.indexOf(id);
        $scope.list.splice(index, 1);
        $scope.storedListUpdated();
    };

    $scope.storedListUpdated = function () {
        $rootScope.$broadcast('StoredList', $scope.list);
    };
});

Additionally, you can achieve this in a messy but fun way by having a common parent controller. Whereby you would $emit up a 'StoredListUpdated' event from 'ManageListCtrl' to the parent controller, then the parent controller would $broadcast the same event down to the 'ListCtrl'. This would allow you to avoid using $rootScope, but it would get pretty messy in terms of readability as you add more events in this way.

It is always a better practice to use a common service that is a singleton for sharing the data between the 2 controllers - just make sure you use only references and not creating a local object in one of the controllers that should actually be in the service

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