3

I understand an array object in Java is created when I call its constructor with the new keyword:

int[] myIntArray = new int[3];

But if I instead write

int[] myIntArray = {1,2,3};

an array object gets created, but I haven't called its constructor with new. How does this work under the hood - how can an object be created in Java without calling the constructor?

6

As far as creating the array object is concerned, it's syntactic sugar. When compiled, it works exactly like the standard syntax.

The difference here though is that with the first version, you aren't populating the array - all elements are the default value for int, which is zero.

With the second version, you're creating, and populating the array.

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5

This part:

{1,2,3}

is an array initializer that can be used as part of a declaration. To quote the JLS, section 10.6:

An array initializer may be specified in a declaration (§8.3, §9.3, §14.4), or as part of an array creation expression (§15.10), to create an array and provide some initial values.

ArrayInitializer: { VariableInitializersopt ,opt }

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4

The first version populates an integer array with the default 0 value. The second assigns values explicitly.

The first version is equivalent to

int[] myIntArray = {0, 0, 0};

while the second is the same as

int[] myIntArray = new int[] {1,2,3};

The new keyword is only mandatory for non declarative statements, for example .

int[] myIntArray;
myIntArray = new int[] {1,2,3};
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2

Both statements are same. The second statement int[] myIntArray = {1,2,3}; is short cut to syntax using new method.

int[] myIntArray ={1,2,3} , this case length of the array is determined by the number of values provided between braces and separated by commas.

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2

Take this code and compile it:

public class ArrayTest {
    public static void main1() {
        int[] array = new int[3]; array[0] = 10; array[1] = 20; array[3] = 30;
    }

    public static void main2() {
        int[] array = new int[] {10, 20, 30};
    }

    public static void main3() {
        int[] array = {10, 20, 30};
    }
}

Then use javap -c to disassemble it to view its bytecode to get the following results. But what you will is that the later two snippets or methods compile to the same bytecode. So int[] array = new int[] {1, 2, 3} and int[] array = {1, 2, 3} are the same. But seperately creating an array and assigning values to each of its element is treated differently and so the later two snippets are not syntactic sugar for the first snippet.

$ javap -c ArrayTest
Compiled from "ArrayTest.java"
public class ArrayTest extends java.lang.Object{
public ArrayTest();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial   #1; //Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
   4:   return

public static void main1();
  Code:
   0:   iconst_3
   1:   newarray int
   3:   astore_0
   4:   aload_0
   5:   iconst_0
   6:   bipush  10
   8:   iastore
   9:   aload_0
   10:  iconst_1
   11:  bipush  20
   13:  iastore
   14:  aload_0
   15:  iconst_3
   16:  bipush  30
   18:  iastore
   19:  return

public static void main2();
  Code:
   0:   iconst_3
   1:   newarray int
   3:   dup
   4:   iconst_0
   5:   bipush  10
   7:   iastore
   8:   dup
   9:   iconst_1
   10:  bipush  20
   12:  iastore
   13:  dup
   14:  iconst_2
   15:  bipush  30
   17:  iastore
   18:  astore_0
   19:  return

public static void main3();
  Code:
   0:   iconst_3
   1:   newarray int
   3:   dup
   4:   iconst_0
   5:   bipush  10
   7:   iastore
   8:   dup
   9:   iconst_1
   10:  bipush  20
   12:  iastore
   13:  dup
   14:  iconst_2
   15:  bipush  30
   17:  iastore
   18:  astore_0
   19:  return
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0

Under the hood, both ways of initializing an array is the same.

For another example, look at this:

String str = "Hello"; // no 'new' statement here

String str = new String("Hello");

Both statements do the same thing, but one is far more convenient than the other. But under the hood, they pretty much do the same thing after compilation.

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  • 2
    i am not sure that both do the same thing. the second code snippet will result in the invocation of a constructor. the first one will not. here are their bytecode representations after compiling their snippets: gist.github.com/VijayKrishna/5834992 – vijay Jun 21 '13 at 23:08
  • 1
    -1 because the first example is an example of a String literal which is interned and possibly may not even create an object, whilst the second example is of explicit construction with a String literal and may create two objects! (one interned, the other not). – Tim Bender Jun 21 '13 at 23:13
  • @vijay so interesting. If you don't mind me asking, how do you access the bytecode representation after compiling. – Pierre Rymiortz Jun 21 '13 at 23:14
  • 1
    Read the .class file with an IDE like eclipse. There is also a tool in the standard jdk, javap I think is the one, but I haven't used it. – Tim Bender Jun 21 '13 at 23:16
  • 1
    @PierreRymiortz, just run this command on your terminal/command prompt: javap -c <name of the class file without the .class extension> – vijay Jun 21 '13 at 23:27

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