How to create a "more" button when user swipe a cell in table view (like mail app in ios 7)

I have been looking for this information both here and in the Cocoa Touch forum, but I cannot seem to find the answer and I am hoping someone smarter than myself can give me a solution.

I would like that when the user swipes a table view cell, to display more than one editing button (he default is the delete button). In the Mail app for iOS 7 you can swipe to delete, but there is a "MORE" button that shows up.

enter image description here

  • 6
  • To add the "Delete" button I implement the following two functions. - (BOOL)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView canEditRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath; - (void)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView commitEditingStyle:(UITableViewCellEditingStyle)editingStyle forRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath; And I want to add the button "More" next to it. – Guy Kahlon Jun 23 '13 at 7:14
  • 3
    @MonishBansal Bansal Looks like someone in this thread (devforums.apple.com/message/860459#860459 in Apple developer forum) went ahead and built their own implementation. You can find a project that does what you want on GitHub:github.com/daria-kopaliani/DAContextMenuTableViewController – Guy Kahlon Oct 7 '13 at 6:01
  • 8
    @GuyKahlonMatrix thanks for the solution it works like a charm. This question is No.1 result on many google searches, and people are forced to exchange their knowledge using the comments because some guy decided it's more helpful to close the question and preach democracy instead. This place clearly needs better mods. – Şafak Gezer Oct 14 '13 at 21:19
  • 2
    If you can target iOS 8, my answer below will be what you want. – Johnny Jul 29 '14 at 0:22

20 Answers 20

How to Implement

It looks like iOS 8 opens up this API. Hints of such functionality are present in Beta 2.

To get something working, implement the following two methods on your UITableView's delegate to get the desired effect (see gist for an example).

- tableView:editActionsForRowAtIndexPath:
- tableView:commitEditingStyle:forRowAtIndexPath:


Known Issues

The documentation says tableView:commitEditingStyle:forRowAtIndexPath is:

"Not called for edit actions using UITableViewRowAction - the action's handler will be invoked instead."

However, the swiping doesn't work without it. Even if the method stub is blank, it still needs it, for now. This is most obviously a bug in beta 2.


Sources

https://twitter.com/marksands/status/481642991745265664 https://gist.github.com/marksands/76558707f583dbb8f870

Original Answer: https://stackoverflow.com/a/24540538/870028


Update:

Sample code with this working (In Swift): http://dropbox.com/s/0fvxosft2mq2v5m/DeleteRowExampleSwift.zip

The sample code contains this easy-to-follow method in MasterViewController.swift, and with just this method you get the behavior shown in the OP screenshot:

override func tableView(tableView: UITableView, editActionsForRowAtIndexPath indexPath: NSIndexPath) -> [AnyObject]? {

    var moreRowAction = UITableViewRowAction(style: UITableViewRowActionStyle.Default, title: "More", handler:{action, indexpath in
        println("MORE•ACTION");
    });
    moreRowAction.backgroundColor = UIColor(red: 0.298, green: 0.851, blue: 0.3922, alpha: 1.0);

    var deleteRowAction = UITableViewRowAction(style: UITableViewRowActionStyle.Default, title: "Delete", handler:{action, indexpath in
        println("DELETE•ACTION");
    });

    return [deleteRowAction, moreRowAction];
}
  • 1
    This seems to be correct, but in Xcode 6 GM the swipe gesture does not seem to work. The editActions can still be accessed by putting the table view in editing mode. Anyone else find that swipe is not working? – Siegfoult Sep 15 '14 at 23:19
  • @Siegfoult Have you tried implementing (even if left empty) tableView:commitEditingStyle:forRowAtIndexPath:? – Johnny Sep 16 '14 at 23:23
  • I have not working in objective c.. Same code i have written. please suggest few hints. – Solid Soft Oct 10 '14 at 9:27
  • @SolidSoft Do you have an example project I could look at? I might be able to help better that way. – Johnny Oct 10 '14 at 22:59
  • 3
    To answer my own comment. You call tableView.editing = false (NO in objc) and the cell will "close". – Ben Lachman Oct 27 '14 at 21:53

I have created a new library to implement swippable buttons which supports a variety of transitions and expandable buttons like iOS 8 mail app.

https://github.com/MortimerGoro/MGSwipeTableCell

This library is compatible with all the different ways to create a UITableViewCell and its tested on iOS 5, iOS 6, iOS 7 and iOS 8.

Here a sample of some transitions:

Border transition:

Border transition

Clip transition

Clip transition

3D Transition:

enter image description here

  • 6
    Wow, seriously impressive work! – Ben Williams Oct 11 '14 at 6:08
  • 1
    Great Work! It would be awesome to have callbacks to customize animations. – Pacu Oct 13 '14 at 19:38
  • 1
    Amazing!!! Just passing by but can't help voting for the fantastic animations!!! – Z.pyyyy Jan 9 '15 at 9:31
  • 1
    @MortimerGoro Nice work man. It looks good. I am trying to implement similar effect in one of my Android Project. Please tell me how can I achieve this in Android? – Nitesh Khatri Jan 10 '15 at 6:32
  • 1
    Great work bro! This helps me a lot and saved lots of time. – Moin Uddin Feb 4 '15 at 4:42

Johnny's answer is the right one to upvote. I'm just adding this below in objective-c to make it clearer to beginners (and those of us who refuse to learn Swift syntax :)

Make sure you declare the uitableviewdelegate and have the following methods:

 -(NSArray *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView editActionsForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {
 UITableViewRowAction *button = [UITableViewRowAction rowActionWithStyle:UITableViewRowActionStyleDefault title:@"Button 1" handler:^(UITableViewRowAction *action, NSIndexPath *indexPath)
    {
        NSLog(@"Action to perform with Button 1");
    }];
    button.backgroundColor = [UIColor greenColor]; //arbitrary color
    UITableViewRowAction *button2 = [UITableViewRowAction rowActionWithStyle:UITableViewRowActionStyleDefault title:@"Button 2" handler:^(UITableViewRowAction *action, NSIndexPath *indexPath)
                                    {
                                        NSLog(@"Action to perform with Button2!");
                                    }];
    button2.backgroundColor = [UIColor blueColor]; //arbitrary color

    return @[button, button2]; //array with all the buttons you want. 1,2,3, etc...
}

- (void)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView commitEditingStyle:(UITableViewCellEditingStyle)editingStyle forRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {
// you need to implement this method too or nothing will work:

}
 - (BOOL)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView canEditRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
    {
        return YES; //tableview must be editable or nothing will work...
    }
  • 1
    important to mention canEditRowAtIndexPath – Heckscheibe Jul 14 '15 at 7:58
  • If I reload table after swiping the cell, then those swipe buttons are visible or hidden? – Ganesh Guturi Oct 14 '15 at 7:05

This is (rather ridiculously) a private API.

The following two methods are private and sent to the UITableView's delegate:

-(NSString *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView titleForSwipeAccessoryButtonForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath;
-(void)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView swipeAccessoryButtonPushedForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath;

They are pretty self explanatory.

  • 4
    Apple has opened up this feature with iOS 8. See Johnny's answer below. – Siegfoult Sep 15 '14 at 23:22

To improve on Johnny's answer, this can now be done using the public API as follows :

func tableView(tableView: UITableView, editActionsForRowAtIndexPath indexPath: NSIndexPath) -> [UITableViewRowAction]? {

    let moreRowAction = UITableViewRowAction(style: UITableViewRowActionStyle.default, title: "More", handler:{action, indexpath in
        print("MORE•ACTION");
    });
    moreRowAction.backgroundColor = UIColor(red: 0.298, green: 0.851, blue: 0.3922, alpha: 1.0);

    let deleteRowAction = UITableViewRowAction(style: UITableViewRowActionStyle.default, title: "Delete", handler:{action, indexpath in
        print("DELETE•ACTION");
    });

    return [deleteRowAction, moreRowAction];
}
  • Could you please update the code to Swift 3? Thanks – bibscy Jan 3 '17 at 19:58
  • thanks working fine. – Shahbaz Akram Jul 4 '17 at 7:29

I hope you cant wait till apple gives you what ever you need right? So here is my option.

Create a custom cell. Have two uiviews in it

1. upper
2. lower

In lower view, add what ever buttons you need. Deal its actions just like any other IBActions. you can decide the animation time, style and anything.

now add a uiswipegesture to the upper view and reveal your lower view on swipe gesture. I have done this before and its the simplest option as far as I am concerned.

Hope that help.

This is not possible using the standard SDK. However there are various 3rd party solutions that more or less imitate the behavior in Mail.app. Some of them (e.g. MCSwipeTableViewCell, DAContextMenuTableViewController, RMSwipeTableViewCell) detect swipes using gesture recognizers, some of them (e.g. SWTableViewCell) put a second UISScrollView below the standard UITableViewCellScrollView (private subview of UITableViewCell) and some of them modify the behavior of UITableViewCellScrollView.

I like the last approach most since the touch handling feels most natural. Specifically, MSCMoreOptionTableViewCell is good. Your choice may vary depending on your specific needs (whether you need a left-to-right pan, too, whether you need iOS 6 compatibility, etc.). Also be aware that most of these approaches come with a burden: they can easily break in a future iOS version if Apple makes changes in the UITableViewCell subview hierarchy.

Swift 3 version code without using any library:

import UIKit

class ViewController: UIViewController, UITableViewDelegate, UITableViewDataSource {

    @IBOutlet weak var tableView: UITableView!

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
        // Do any additional setup after loading the view, typically from a nib.

        tableView.tableFooterView = UIView(frame: CGRect.zero) //Hiding blank cells.
        tableView.separatorInset = UIEdgeInsets.zero
        tableView.dataSource = self
        tableView.delegate = self
    }

    override func didReceiveMemoryWarning() {
        super.didReceiveMemoryWarning()
        // Dispose of any resources that can be recreated.
    }

    func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, numberOfRowsInSection section: Int) -> Int {

        return 4
    }

    func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, cellForRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) -> UITableViewCell {

        let cell: UITableViewCell = tableView.dequeueReusableCell(withIdentifier: "tableCell", for: indexPath)

        return cell
    }

    //Enable cell editing methods.
    func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, canEditRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) -> Bool {

        return true
    }

    func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, commit editingStyle: UITableViewCellEditingStyle, forRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) {

    }

    func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, editActionsForRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) -> [UITableViewRowAction]? {

        let more = UITableViewRowAction(style: .normal, title: "More") { action, index in
            //self.isEditing = false
            print("more button tapped")
        }
        more.backgroundColor = UIColor.lightGray

        let favorite = UITableViewRowAction(style: .normal, title: "Favorite") { action, index in
            //self.isEditing = false
            print("favorite button tapped")
        }
        favorite.backgroundColor = UIColor.orange

        let share = UITableViewRowAction(style: .normal, title: "Share") { action, index in
            //self.isEditing = false
            print("share button tapped")
        }
        share.backgroundColor = UIColor.blue

        return [share, favorite, more]
    }

}

You need to subclass UITableViewCell and subclass method willTransitionToState:(UITableViewCellStateMask)state which is called whenever user swipes the cell. The state flags will let you know if the Delete button is showing, and show/hide your More button there.

Unfortunately this method gives you neither the width of the Delete button nor the animation time. So you need to observer & hard-code your More button's frame and animation time into your code (I personally think Apple needs to do something about this).

  • 7
    "I personally think Apple needs to do something about this". I agree. Did you already write them a bug report / feature request? – Tafkadasoh Jun 28 '13 at 18:03

For swift programming

func tableView(tableView: UITableView, commitEditingStyle editingStyle: UITableViewCellEditingStyle, forRowAtIndexPath indexPath: NSIndexPath) {
  if editingStyle == UITableViewCellEditingStyle.Delete {
    deleteModelAt(indexPath.row)
    self.tableView.deleteRowsAtIndexPaths([indexPath], withRowAnimation: .Automatic)
  }
  else if editingStyle == UITableViewCellEditingStyle.Insert {
    println("insert editing action")
  }
}

func tableView(tableView: UITableView, editActionsForRowAtIndexPath indexPath: NSIndexPath) -> [AnyObject]? {
  var archiveAction = UITableViewRowAction(style: .Default, title: "Archive",handler: { (action: UITableViewRowAction!, indexPath: NSIndexPath!) in
        // maybe show an action sheet with more options
        self.tableView.setEditing(false, animated: false)
      }
  )
  archiveAction.backgroundColor = UIColor.lightGrayColor()

  var deleteAction = UITableViewRowAction(style: .Normal, title: "Delete",
      handler: { (action: UITableViewRowAction!, indexPath: NSIndexPath!) in
        self.deleteModelAt(indexPath.row)
        self.tableView.deleteRowsAtIndexPaths([indexPath], withRowAnimation: .Automatic);
      }
  );
  deleteAction.backgroundColor = UIColor.redColor()

  return [deleteAction, archiveAction]
}

func deleteModelAt(index: Int) {
  //... delete logic for model
}
  • Could you please update code for Swift 3? – bibscy Jan 3 '17 at 15:51
  • @bibscy you are welcome to suggest an edit. Haven't used swift in a long time so not sure what the correct syntax is – Michael Yagudaev Jan 7 '17 at 1:41

THIS COULD HELP YOU OUT.

-(NSArray *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView editActionsForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {
 UITableViewRowAction *button = [UITableViewRowAction rowActionWithStyle:UITableViewRowActionStyleDefault title:@"Button 1" handler:^(UITableViewRowAction *action, NSIndexPath *indexPath)
    {
        NSLog(@"Action to perform with Button 1");
    }];
    button.backgroundColor = [UIColor greenColor]; //arbitrary color
    UITableViewRowAction *button2 = [UITableViewRowAction rowActionWithStyle:UITableViewRowActionStyleDefault title:@"Button 2" handler:^(UITableViewRowAction *action, NSIndexPath *indexPath)
                                    {
                                        NSLog(@"Action to perform with Button2!");
                                    }];
    button2.backgroundColor = [UIColor blueColor]; //arbitrary color

    return @[button, button2]; //array with all the buttons you want. 1,2,3, etc...
}

- (void)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView commitEditingStyle:(UITableViewCellEditingStyle)editingStyle forRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {
// you need to implement this method too or nothing will work:

}
 - (BOOL)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView canEditRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
    {
        return YES; //tableview must be editable or nothing will work...
    }

I was looking to add the same functionality to my app, and after going through so many different tutorials (raywenderlich being the best DIY solution), I found out that Apple has its own UITableViewRowActionclass, which is very handy.

You have to change the Tableview's boilerpoint method to this:

override func tableView(tableView: UITableView, editActionsForRowAtIndexPath indexPath: NSIndexPath) -> [AnyObject]?  {
    // 1   
    var shareAction = UITableViewRowAction(style: UITableViewRowActionStyle.Default, title: "Share" , handler: { (action:UITableViewRowAction!, indexPath:NSIndexPath!) -> Void in
    // 2
    let shareMenu = UIAlertController(title: nil, message: "Share using", preferredStyle: .ActionSheet)

    let twitterAction = UIAlertAction(title: "Twitter", style: UIAlertActionStyle.Default, handler: nil)
    let cancelAction = UIAlertAction(title: "Cancel", style: UIAlertActionStyle.Cancel, handler: nil)

    shareMenu.addAction(twitterAction)
    shareMenu.addAction(cancelAction)


    self.presentViewController(shareMenu, animated: true, completion: nil)
    })
    // 3
    var rateAction = UITableViewRowAction(style: UITableViewRowActionStyle.Default, title: "Rate" , handler: { (action:UITableViewRowAction!, indexPath:NSIndexPath!) -> Void in
    // 4
    let rateMenu = UIAlertController(title: nil, message: "Rate this App", preferredStyle: .ActionSheet)

    let appRateAction = UIAlertAction(title: "Rate", style: UIAlertActionStyle.Default, handler: nil)
    let cancelAction = UIAlertAction(title: "Cancel", style: UIAlertActionStyle.Cancel, handler: nil)

    rateMenu.addAction(appRateAction)
    rateMenu.addAction(cancelAction)


    self.presentViewController(rateMenu, animated: true, completion: nil)
    })
    // 5
    return [shareAction,rateAction]
  }

You can find out more about this on This Site. Apple's own documentation is really useful for changing the background colour:

The background color of the action button.

Declaration OBJECTIVE-C @property(nonatomic, copy) UIColor *backgroundColor Discussion Use this property to specify the background color for your button. If you do not specify a value for this property, UIKit assigns a default color based on the value in the style property.

Availability Available in iOS 8.0 and later.

If you want to change the font of the button, it's a bit more tricky. I've seen another post on SO. For the sake of providing the code as well as the link, here's the code they used there. You'd have to change the appearance of the button. You'd have to make a specific reference to tableviewcell, otherwise you'd change the button's appearance throughout your app (I didn't want that, but you might, I don't know :) )

Objective C:

+ (void)setupDeleteRowActionStyleForUserCell {

    UIFont *font = [UIFont fontWithName:@"AvenirNext-Regular" size:19];

    NSDictionary *attributes = @{NSFontAttributeName: font,
                      NSForegroundColorAttributeName: [UIColor whiteColor]};

    NSAttributedString *attributedTitle = [[NSAttributedString alloc] initWithString: @"DELETE"
                                                                          attributes: attributes];

    /*
     * We include UIView in the containment hierarchy because there is another button in UserCell that is a direct descendant of UserCell that we don't want this to affect.
     */
    [[UIButton appearanceWhenContainedIn:[UIView class], [UserCell class], nil] setAttributedTitle: attributedTitle
                                                                                          forState: UIControlStateNormal];
}

Swift:

    //create your attributes however you want to
    let attributes = [NSFontAttributeName: UIFont.systemFontOfSize(UIFont.systemFontSize())] as Dictionary!            

   //Add more view controller types in the []
    UIButton.appearanceWhenContainedInInstancesOfClasses([ViewController.self])

This is the easiest, and most stream-lined version IMHO. Hope it helps.

Update: Here's the Swift 3.0 version:

func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, editActionsForRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) -> [UITableViewRowAction]? {
    var shareAction:UITableViewRowAction = UITableViewRowAction(style: .default, title: "Share", handler: {(action, cellIndexpath) -> Void in
        let shareMenu = UIAlertController(title: nil, message: "Share using", preferredStyle: .actionSheet)

        let twitterAction = UIAlertAction(title: "Twitter", style: .default, handler: nil)
        let cancelAction = UIAlertAction(title: "Cancel", style: .cancel, handler: nil)

        shareMenu.addAction(twitterAction)
        shareMenu.addAction(cancelAction)


        self.present(shareMenu,animated: true, completion: nil)
    })

    var rateAction:UITableViewRowAction = UITableViewRowAction(style: .default, title: "Rate" , handler: {(action, cellIndexpath) -> Void in
        // 4
        let rateMenu = UIAlertController(title: nil, message: "Rate this App", preferredStyle: .actionSheet)

        let appRateAction = UIAlertAction(title: "Rate", style: .default, handler: nil)
        let cancelAction = UIAlertAction(title: "Cancel", style: .cancel, handler: nil)

        rateMenu.addAction(appRateAction)
        rateMenu.addAction(cancelAction)


        self.present(rateMenu, animated: true, completion: nil)
    })
    // 5
    return [shareAction,rateAction]
}
  • 1
    Thanks for your answer, I'm sure it will help for many developers. Yes, you are right, actually Apple provides this solution from iOS 8. But unfortunately this native solution doesn't provide the full functionality. For example, in Apple's Mail app you have buttons from two sides (One button from the left side, and three from the right side) with the current API from Apple you cannot add buttons to both sides, and also the current API does not support the default action when the user swipe long to each side. The best solution for now IMHO is the open source MGSwipeTableCell. – Guy Kahlon Jan 2 '16 at 11:52
  • @GuyKahlon yes, you're absolutely right in regards to the left and right swipe issue, and I agree that for more customisation, the MGSwipeTableCell is the best. Apple's own is not the most sophisticated option, but I found it most straight forward for simple tasks. – Septronic Jan 2 '16 at 14:33
  • @Septronic Could you please update your code to Swift 3? shareMenu. does not take a addAction method. Thanks – bibscy Jan 3 '17 at 21:18
  • @bibscy I've added the swift version. Do you need the bit for the attribute as well? sharemenu is just an UIAlertController, so it should take the action. Try it and let me know if any luck :) – Septronic Jan 3 '17 at 21:40

Actual Swift 3 Answer

This is the ONLY function you need. You do not need CanEdit or CommitEditingStyle functions for custom actions.

func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, editActionsForRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) -> [UITableViewRowAction]? {
    let action1 = UITableViewRowAction(style: .default, title: "Action1", handler: {
        (action, indexPath) in
        print("Action1")
    })
    action1.backgroundColor = UIColor.lightGray
    let action2 = UITableViewRowAction(style: .default, title: "Action2", handler: {
        (action, indexPath) in
        print("Action2")
    })
    return [action1, action2]
}

As of iOS 11 this is publicly available in UITableViewDelegate. Here's some sample code:

- (UISwipeActionsConfiguration *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView trailingSwipeActionsConfigurationForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {
    UIContextualAction *delete = [UIContextualAction contextualActionWithStyle:UIContextualActionStyleDestructive
                                                                         title:@"DELETE"
                                                                       handler:^(UIContextualAction * _Nonnull action, __kindof UIView * _Nonnull sourceView, void (^ _Nonnull completionHandler)(BOOL)) {
                                                                           NSLog(@"index path of delete: %@", indexPath);
                                                                           completionHandler(YES);
                                                                       }];

    UIContextualAction *rename = [UIContextualAction contextualActionWithStyle:UIContextualActionStyleNormal
                                                                         title:@"RENAME"
                                                                       handler:^(UIContextualAction * _Nonnull action, __kindof UIView * _Nonnull sourceView, void (^ _Nonnull completionHandler)(BOOL)) {
                                                                           NSLog(@"index path of rename: %@", indexPath);
                                                                           completionHandler(YES);
                                                                       }];

    UISwipeActionsConfiguration *swipeActionConfig = [UISwipeActionsConfiguration configurationWithActions:@[rename, delete]];
    swipeActionConfig.performsFirstActionWithFullSwipe = NO;

    return swipeActionConfig;
}

Also available:

- (UISwipeActionsConfiguration *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView leadingSwipeActionsConfigurationForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath;

Docs: https://developer.apple.com/documentation/uikit/uitableviewdelegate/2902367-tableview?language=objc

Swift 4 & iOs 11+

@available(iOS 11.0, *)
override func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, trailingSwipeActionsConfigurationForRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) -> UISwipeActionsConfiguration? {

    let delete = UIContextualAction(style: .destructive, title: "Delete") { _, _, handler in

        handler(true)
        // handle deletion here
    }

    let more = UIContextualAction(style: .normal, title: "More") { _, _, handler in

        handler(true)
        // handle more here
    }

    return UISwipeActionsConfiguration(actions: [delete, more])
}

Here's a somewhat fragile way of doing it that does not involve private APIs or constructing your own system. You're hedging your bets that Apple doesn't break this and that hopefully they will release an API that you can replace these few lines of code with.

  1. KVO self.contentView.superview.layer.sublayer. Do this in init. This is the UIScrollView's layer. You can't KVO 'subviews'.
  2. When subviews changes, find the delete confirmation view within scrollview.subviews. This is done in the observe callback.
  3. Double the size of that view and add a UIButton to the left of its only subview. This is also done in the observe callback. The only subview of the delete confirmation view is the delete button.
  4. (optional) The UIButton event should look up self.superview until it finds a UITableView and then call a datasource or delegate method you create, such as tableView:commitCustomEditingStyle:forRowAtIndexPath:. You may find the indexPath of the cell by using [tableView indexPathForCell:self].

This also requires that you implement the standard table view editing delegate callbacks.

static char kObserveContext = 0;

@implementation KZTableViewCell {
    UIScrollView *_contentScrollView;
    UIView *_confirmationView;
    UIButton *_editButton;
    UIButton *_deleteButton;
}

- (id)initWithStyle:(UITableViewCellStyle)style reuseIdentifier:(NSString *)reuseIdentifier {
    self = [super initWithStyle:style reuseIdentifier:reuseIdentifier];
    if (self) {
        _contentScrollView = (id)self.contentView.superview;

        [_contentScrollView.layer addObserver:self
             forKeyPath:@"sublayers"
                options:0
                context:&kObserveContext];

        _editButton = [UIButton new];
        _editButton.backgroundColor = [UIColor lightGrayColor];
        [_editButton setTitle:@"Edit" forState:UIControlStateNormal];
        [_editButton addTarget:self
                        action:@selector(_editTap)
              forControlEvents:UIControlEventTouchUpInside];

    }
    return self;
}

-(void)dealloc {
    [_contentScrollView.layer removeObserver:self forKeyPath:@"sublayers" context:&kObserveContext];
}

-(void)observeValueForKeyPath:(NSString *)keyPath ofObject:(id)object change:(NSDictionary *)change context:(void *)context {
    if(context != &kObserveContext) {
        [super observeValueForKeyPath:keyPath ofObject:object change:change context:context];
        return;
    }
    if(object == _contentScrollView.layer) {
        for(UIView * view in _contentScrollView.subviews) {
            if([NSStringFromClass(view.class) hasSuffix:@"ConfirmationView"]) {
                _confirmationView = view;
                _deleteButton = [view.subviews objectAtIndex:0];
                CGRect frame = _confirmationView.frame;
                CGRect frame2 = frame;
                frame.origin.x -= frame.size.width;
                frame.size.width *= 2;
                _confirmationView.frame = frame;

                frame2.origin = CGPointZero;
                _editButton.frame = frame2;
                frame2.origin.x += frame2.size.width;
                _deleteButton.frame = frame2;
                [_confirmationView addSubview:_editButton];
                break;
            }
        }
        return;
    }
}

-(void)_editTap {
    UITableView *tv = (id)self.superview;
    while(tv && ![tv isKindOfClass:[UITableView class]]) {
        tv = (id)tv.superview;
    }
    id<UITableViewDelegate> delegate = tv.delegate;
    if([delegate respondsToSelector:@selector(tableView:editTappedForRowWithIndexPath:)]) {
        NSIndexPath *ip = [tv indexPathForCell:self];
        // define this in your own protocol
        [delegate tableView:tv editTappedForRowWithIndexPath:ip];
    }
}
@end
  • I'm really happy if you can provide sample code, Thanks – Guy Kahlon Jun 10 '14 at 13:27
  • Done. It might have a bug or two, but you get the gist. – xtravar Jun 11 '14 at 22:12
  • Thanks for the help – Guy Kahlon Jun 13 '14 at 9:02

There is an amazing library called SwipeCellKit, it should gain more acknowledgement. In my opinion it is cooler than MGSwipeTableCell. The latter doesn't completely replicate the behavior of the Mail app's cells whereas SwipeCellKit does. Have a look

  • I tried out SwipeCellKit and was impressed... until I got one of those Exceptions because the number of rows before a table view update was not the same as after the update +/- the change in rows. The thing is, I never changed my data set. So if that's not worrying, I don't know what is. So I decided against using it and just used the new UITableViewDelegate methods. If you need more customization, you can always override willBeginEditingRowAt: .... – horseshoe7 Nov 3 '17 at 16:04
  • @horseshoe7 that's weird. I have never run into any exception when using SwipeCellKit. After all what kind of relation can a cell have to such an exception which happens due to datasource changes? – Andrey Chernukha Jan 31 at 17:53

Swift 4

func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, trailingSwipeActionsConfigurationForRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) -> UISwipeActionsConfiguration? {
    let delete = UIContextualAction(style: .destructive, title: "Delete") { (action, sourceView, completionHandler) in
        print("index path of delete: \(indexPath)")
        completionHandler(true)
    }
    let rename = UIContextualAction(style: .normal, title: "Edit") { (action, sourceView, completionHandler) in
        print("index path of edit: \(indexPath)")
        completionHandler(true)
    }
    let swipeActionConfig = UISwipeActionsConfiguration(actions: [rename, delete])
    swipeActionConfig.performsFirstActionWithFullSwipe = false
    return swipeActionConfig
}
  • what is source view in your codes? is it Icon or Image ? – Saeed Rahmatolahi May 7 at 19:14
  • 1
    @SaeedRahmatolahi, sourceView is "The view in which the action was displayed." For more info, search "UIContextualAction.Handler". – Mark Moeykens Sep 9 at 14:16

I used tableViewCell to show multiple data, after swipe () right to left on a cell it will show two buttons Approve And reject, there are two methods, the first one is ApproveFunc which takes one argument, and the another one is RejectFunc which also takes one argument.

enter image description here

func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, editActionsForRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) -> [UITableViewRowAction]? {
        let Approve = UITableViewRowAction(style: .normal, title: "Approve") { action, index in

            self.ApproveFunc(indexPath: indexPath)
        }
        Approve.backgroundColor = .green

        let Reject = UITableViewRowAction(style: .normal, title: "Reject") { action, index in

            self.rejectFunc(indexPath: indexPath)
        }
        Reject.backgroundColor = .red



        return [Reject, Approve]
    }

    func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, canEditRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) -> Bool {
        return true
    }

    func ApproveFunc(indexPath: IndexPath) {
        print(indexPath.row)
    }
    func rejectFunc(indexPath: IndexPath) {
        print(indexPath.row)
    }
  • Can you add some explanation to your answer such that a reader can learn from it? – Nico Haase Aug 7 at 8:39
  • Thank you for this code snippet, which might provide some limited, immediate help. A proper explanation would greatly improve its long-term value by showing why this is a good solution to the problem, and would make it more useful to future readers with other, similar questions. Please edit your answer to add some explanation, including the assumptions you've made. – Tim Diekmann Aug 7 at 8:56

Here is one simple solution. It is capable to display and hide custom UIView inside UITableViewCell. Displaying logic is contained inside class extended from UITableViewCell, BaseTableViewCell.

BaseTableViewCell.h

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>

@interface BaseTableViewCell : UITableViewCell

@property(nonatomic,strong)UIView* customView;

-(void)showCustomView;

-(void)hideCustomView;

@end

BaseTableViewCell.M

#import "BaseTableViewCell.h"

@interface BaseTableViewCell()
{
    BOOL _isCustomViewVisible;
}

@end

@implementation BaseTableViewCell

- (void)awakeFromNib {
    // Initialization code
}

-(void)prepareForReuse
{
    self.customView = nil;
    _isCustomViewVisible = NO;
}

- (void)setSelected:(BOOL)selected animated:(BOOL)animated {
    [super setSelected:selected animated:animated];

    // Configure the view for the selected state
}

-(void)showCustomView
{
    if(nil != self.customView)
    {
        if(!_isCustomViewVisible)
        {
            _isCustomViewVisible = YES;

            if(!self.customView.superview)
            {
                CGRect frame = self.customView.frame;
                frame.origin.x = self.contentView.frame.size.width;
                self.customView.frame = frame;
                [self.customView willMoveToSuperview:self.contentView];
                [self.contentView addSubview:self.customView];
                [self.customView didMoveToSuperview];
            }

            __weak BaseTableViewCell* blockSelf = self;
            [UIView animateWithDuration:.5 animations:^(){

                for(UIView* view in blockSelf.contentView.subviews)
                {
                    CGRect frame = view.frame;
                    frame.origin.x = frame.origin.x - blockSelf.customView.frame.size.width;
                    view.frame = frame;
                }
            }];
        }
    }
}

-(void)hideCustomView
{
    if(nil != self.customView)
    {
        if(_isCustomViewVisible)
        {
            __weak BaseTableViewCell* blockSelf = self;
            _isCustomViewVisible = NO;
            [UIView animateWithDuration:.5 animations:^(){
                for(UIView* view in blockSelf.contentView.subviews)
                {
                    CGRect frame = view.frame;
                    frame.origin.x = frame.origin.x + blockSelf.customView.frame.size.width;
                    view.frame = frame;
                }
            }];
        }
    }
}

@end

To get this functionality, simple extend your table view cell from BaseTableViewCell.

Next, Inside UIViewController, which implement UITableViewDelegate, create two gesture recognizers to handle left and right swipes.

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    [super viewDidLoad];
    // Do any additional setup after loading the view, typically from a nib.

    [self.tableView registerNib:[UINib nibWithNibName:CUSTOM_CELL_NIB_NAME bundle:nil] forCellReuseIdentifier:CUSTOM_CELL_ID];

    UISwipeGestureRecognizer* leftSwipeRecognizer = [[UISwipeGestureRecognizer alloc] initWithTarget:self action:@selector(handleLeftSwipe:)];
    leftSwipeRecognizer.direction = UISwipeGestureRecognizerDirectionLeft;
    [self.tableView addGestureRecognizer:leftSwipeRecognizer];

    UISwipeGestureRecognizer* rightSwipeRecognizer = [[UISwipeGestureRecognizer alloc] initWithTarget:self action:@selector(handleRightSwipe:)];
    rightSwipeRecognizer.direction = UISwipeGestureRecognizerDirectionRight;
    [self.tableView addGestureRecognizer:rightSwipeRecognizer];
}

Than add two swipe handlers

- (void)handleLeftSwipe:(UISwipeGestureRecognizer*)recognizer
{
    CGPoint point = [recognizer locationInView:self.tableView];
    NSIndexPath* index = [self.tableView indexPathForRowAtPoint:point];

    UITableViewCell* cell = [self.tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:index];

    if([cell respondsToSelector:@selector(showCustomView)])
    {
        [cell performSelector:@selector(showCustomView)];
    }
}

- (void)handleRightSwipe:(UISwipeGestureRecognizer*)recognizer
{
    CGPoint point = [recognizer locationInView:self.tableView];
    NSIndexPath* index = [self.tableView indexPathForRowAtPoint:point];

    UITableViewCell* cell = [self.tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:index];

    if([cell respondsToSelector:@selector(hideCustomView)])
    {
        [cell performSelector:@selector(hideCustomView)];
    }
}

Now, inside cellForRowAtIndexPath, of UITableViewDelegate, you can create custom UIView and attach it to the dequeued cell.

-(UITableViewCell*)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
    CustomCellTableViewCell* cell = (CustomCellTableViewCell*)[tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:@"CustomCellTableViewCell" forIndexPath:indexPath];

    NSArray* nibViews = [[NSBundle mainBundle] loadNibNamed:@"CellCustomView"
                                                      owner:nil
                                                    options:nil];

    CellCustomView* customView = (CellCustomView*)[ nibViews objectAtIndex: 0];

    cell.customView = customView;

    return cell;
}

Of course, this way of loading of custom UIView is just for this example. Manage it as you want.

protected by Community Jul 20 '15 at 6:00

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site (the association bonus does not count).

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.