88

I have a question about dealing with m2m / through models and their presentation in django rest framework. Let's take a classic example:

models.py:

from django.db import models

class Member(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length = 20)
    groups = models.ManyToManyField('Group', through = 'Membership')

class Group(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length = 20)

class Membership(models.Model):
    member = models.ForeignKey('Member')
    group = models.ForeignKey('Group')
    join_date = models.DateTimeField()

serializers.py:

imports...

class MemberSerializer(ModelSerializer):
    class Meta:
        model = Member

class GroupSerializer(ModelSerializer):
    class Meta:
        model = Group

views.py:

imports...

class MemberViewSet(ModelViewSet):
    queryset = Member.objects.all()
    serializer_class = MemberSerializer

class GroupViewSet(ModelViewSet):
    queryset = Group.objects.all()
    serializer_class = GroupSerializer

When GETing an instance of Member, I successfully receive all of the member's fields and also its groups - however I only get the groups' details, without extra details that comes from the Membership model.

In other words I expect to receive:

{
   'id' : 2,
   'name' : 'some member',
   'groups' : [
      {
         'id' : 55,
         'name' : 'group 1'
         'join_date' : 34151564
      },
      {
         'id' : 56,
         'name' : 'group 2'
         'join_date' : 11200299
      }
   ]
}

Note the join_date.

I have tried oh so many solutions, including of course Django Rest-Framework official page about it and no one seems to give a proper plain answer about it - what do I need to do to include these extra fields? I found it more straight-forward with django-tastypie but had some other problems and prefer rest-framework.

117

How about.....

On your MemberSerializer, define a field on it like:

groups = MembershipSerializer(source='membership_set', many=True)

and then on your membership serializer you can create this:

class MembershipSerializer(serializers.HyperlinkedModelSerializer):

    id = serializers.Field(source='group.id')
    name = serializers.Field(source='group.name')

    class Meta:
        model = Membership

        fields = ('id', 'name', 'join_date', )

That has the overall effect of creating a serialized value, groups, that has as its source the membership you want, and then it uses a custom serializer to pull out the bits you want to display.

EDIT: as commented by @bryanph, serializers.field was renamed to serializers.ReadOnlyField in DRF 3.0, so this should read:

class MembershipSerializer(serializers.HyperlinkedModelSerializer):

    id = serializers.ReadOnlyField(source='group.id')
    name = serializers.ReadOnlyField(source='group.name')

    class Meta:
        model = Membership

        fields = ('id', 'name', 'join_date', )

for any modern implementations

  • 1
    fyi, I've tried many variants of this and I can't get this working. This isn't in the official docs? Where is membership_set defined? – clay Jun 18 '15 at 22:55
  • 3
    membership_set is the default related name for Member -> Membership – dustinfarris Jul 11 '15 at 14:37
  • The trick part for me was discovering the "membership_set" name. I had a through model with no explicit "related" name, so I had to guess the name of it, by reading the docs at Django Many to Many. – miceno Jan 25 '16 at 19:19
  • this works great, thanks for the hint. I think however DRF in this case is somewhat counterintuitive because class Member already defines a m2m field called groups and this solution seems to override the field in the serialiser by forcing it to point to the reverse relationship from the through model. I'm not very much into DRF implementation details, but probably with model introspection it could be handed automatically. just some food for thought :) – gru Apr 8 '16 at 9:10
  • Any case you could update us on whether this works with the latest version of DRF? Or at least tell which version you were using? I can not make DRF to return the through field model - it always ends up with the original relation (instead of Membership - it would always return Group). – Andrey Cizov Oct 17 '16 at 11:46
11

I was facing this problem and my solution (using DRF 3.6) was to use SerializerMethodField on the object and explicitly query the Membership table like so:

class MembershipSerializer(serializers.ModelSerializer):
    """Used as a nested serializer by MemberSerializer"""
    class Meta:
        model = Membership
        fields = ('id','group','join_date')

class MemberSerializer(serializers.ModelSerializer):
    groups = serializers.SerializerMethodField()

    class Meta:
        model = Member
        fields = ('id','name','groups')

    def get_groups(self, obj):
        "obj is a Member instance. Returns list of dicts"""
        qset = Membership.objects.filter(member=obj)
        return [MembershipSerializer(m).data for m in qset]

This will return a list of dicts for the groups key where each dict is serialized from the MembershipSerializer. To make it writable, you can define your own create/update method inside the MemberSerializer where you iterate over the input data and explicitly create or update Membership model instances.

-1

NOTE: As a Software Engineer, I love to use Architectures and I have deeply worked on Layered Approach for Development so I am gonna be Answering it with Respect to Tiers.

As i understood the Issue, Here's the Solution models.py

class Member(models.Model):
    member_id = models.AutoField(primary_key=True)
    member_name = models.CharField(max_length = 

class Group(models.Model):
    group_id = models.AutoField(primary_key=True)
    group_name = models.CharField(max_length = 20)
    fk_member_id = models.ForeignKey('Member', models.DO_NOTHING, 
                             db_column='fk_member_id', blank=True, null=True)

class Membership(models.Model):
    membershipid = models.AutoField(primary_key=True)
    fk_group_id = models.ForeignKey('Group', models.DO_NOTHING, 
                             db_column='fk_member_id', blank=True, null=True)
    join_date = models.DateTimeField()

serializers.py

import serializer

class AllSerializer(serializer.Serializer):
    group_id = serializer.IntegerField()
    group_name = serializer.CharField(max_length = 20)
    join_date = serializer.DateTimeField()

CustomModels.py

imports...

    class AllDataModel():
        group_id = ""
        group_name = ""
        join_date = ""

BusinessLogic.py

imports ....
class getdata(memberid):
    alldataDict = {}
    dto = []
    Member = models.Members.objects.get(member_id=memberid) #or use filter for Name
    alldataDict["MemberId"] = Member.member_id
    alldataDict["MemberName"] = Member.member_name
    Groups = models.Group.objects.filter(fk_member_id=Member)
    for item in Groups:
        Custommodel = CustomModels.AllDataModel()
        Custommodel.group_id = item.group_id
        Custommodel.group_name = item.group_name
        Membership = models.Membership.objects.get(fk_group_id=item.group_id)
        Custommodel.join_date = Membership.join_date
        dto.append(Custommodel)
    serializer = AllSerializer(dto,many=True)
    alldataDict.update(serializer.data)
    return alldataDict

You would technically, have to pass the Request to DataAccessLayer which would return the Filtered Objects from Data Access Layer but as I have to Answer the Question in a Fast Manner so i adjusted the Code in Business Logic Layer!

  • 1
    This is a Full Customized Approach which I use for most of my Rest API developments as I am not really a fan of work with Bounds even though Django Rest Framework is quite flexible! – Syed Faizan Aug 2 '18 at 18:00
  • 1
    This is waaaay too over engineered, also it doesn't even use DRF. – michauwilliam Jan 26 at 17:05

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